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Journey by Journey => London to the West => Topic started by: Jamsdad on January 16, 2020, 12:26:46 pm



Title: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Jamsdad on January 16, 2020, 12:26:46 pm
Nothing moving at Dawlish today.Failed IET swamped by waves and has to await rescue loco from Exeter for a tow.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: bobm on January 16, 2020, 12:43:22 pm
As well as the failed IET (10:52 Paignton to London Paddington) a passenger on the 10:57 Exmouth to Paignton has suffered a minor injury after a wave hit the train and smashed some windows at Dawlish.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: bobm on January 16, 2020, 01:10:39 pm
The IET is now on its way to Exeter running 1 hour and 40 minutes late.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: AMLAG on January 16, 2020, 05:25:32 pm

I travelled on the 1100 St D to Paignton cl150 + 143 today and found,an hour after High tide, the waves and sea spray crashing over the line and trains which as by no means exceptionally rough in my many years of traveling on this 'fragile' South Devon line.
Windows being damaged / broken does very occasionally happen  due sand and shingle being conveyed in the waves.
However I wonder if the activities of Network Rail's Contractors who have been excavating, disturbing, loosening and moving around lots of beach material is now a contributory factor.

Today's 1052 Paignton/Paddington failure is at least the fourth or fifth IET failure /major service disruption incident due the effects of waves and salt water ingress on these new IETs; despite assurances from Hitachi that these new multiple unit trains could cope with waves and sea water.
Surely it can't be long before NR Operating Chiefs extend the ban, that applies to
XC Voyagers, to IETs operating between Exeter and N. Abbot when strong and gale force Southerly and SE winds coincide with times of high tides.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: plymothian on January 16, 2020, 06:06:33 pm
Hoping this picture uploads


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: infoman on January 16, 2020, 06:31:54 pm
BBC local west country spotlight news is showing the unit at Dawlish.



Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: eightonedee on January 16, 2020, 07:04:51 pm
Is this a new use for old Pacers- to provide an emergency shuttle service through Dawlish in stormy weather?


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: johnneyw on January 16, 2020, 09:02:46 pm
A non fully compliant train over a short distance on a temporary basis is better than no train surely?

Edit: Stupid spolling mistake.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Kernowman on January 16, 2020, 11:28:08 pm

I travelled on the 1100 St D to Paignton cl150 + 143 today and found,an hour after High tide, the waves and sea spray crashing over the line and trains which as by no means exceptionally rough in my many years of traveling on this 'fragile' South Devon line.
Windows being damaged / broken does very occasionally happen  due sand and shingle being conveyed in the waves.
However I wonder if the activities of Network Rail's Contractors who have been excavating, disturbing, loosening and moving around lots of beach material is now a contributory factor.

Today's 1052 Paignton/Paddington failure is at least the fourth or fifth IET failure /major service disruption incident due the effects of waves and salt water ingress on these new IETs; despite assurances from Hitachi that these new multiple unit trains could cope with waves and sea water.
Surely it can't be long before NR Operating Chiefs extend the ban, that applies to
XC Voyagers, to IETs operating between Exeter and N. Abbot when strong and gale force Southerly and SE winds coincide with times of high tides.


Yes I thought that the new IETs were supposed to be Salt water proof and I'm surprised (but not that surprised really) at the amount of cancellations caused by salt water ingress to IETs. In fact there was a thread somewhere on this forum about how the IET's were being salt water proofed prior to their introduction.

On another note what happened to single line working between Teignmouth and Dawlish Warren during rough weather, does this still happen? Or do they just keep both lines open (or both lines shut)? Mind you I guess if you're on a Pacer, the ride next to a rough sea is only marginally bumpier to a normal ride on a Pacer!  :P

If any line has a big Neon sign over it saying 'Reopen me for God's sake!' the Plymouth - Tavistock - Okehampton - Exeter route surely must be a prime candidate. The populations of Tavistock and Okehampton make it a contender anyway before you even look at the route's diversionary possibilities.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: broadgage on January 17, 2020, 06:12:30 am
Re-opening would be expensive.
Cheaper would be another round of studies and consultations, the result of which will be that further studies are needed.

And a joint study "with our industry partners" as to why the new trains don't work in the adverse but entirely expected conditions at Dawlish. The result of that study will be something along the lines that things will get better, in some not clearly defined way, and without any clear timescale.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: grahame on January 17, 2020, 07:50:18 am
An update from Devon Live (http://), posted yesterday afternoon:

Quote
Why a 'Dawlish avoiding' train line in the South West won't happen

The injury to a passenger after a wave smashed the windows of a train travelling past Dawlish has once again re-opened the debate about whether there needs to be a rail line that avoids the sea.

When built back in the 1840s, the difficult terrain inland between Exeter and Newton Abbot led Isambard Kingdom Brunel to adopt a coastal route for the South Devon Railway ...

Actually a very long article showing all the various options and all the official responses - good to see it all together in one place (pity about the advert infestation, but then that's what pays for the page, I guess!)



Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: eightf48544 on January 17, 2020, 11:16:43 am
If HS2 cancelled surely Okehampton Tavistock would be cheaper per mile, quicker to build and far more use.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: sikejsudjek3 on January 17, 2020, 11:28:04 am
If HS2 cancelled surely Okehampton Tavistock would be cheaper per mile, quicker to build and far more use.

Yes but has anyone asked the newts yet ? Besides how many bankers can get to London quicker ?


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: broadgage on January 17, 2020, 01:37:58 pm
If HS2 cancelled surely Okehampton Tavistock would be cheaper per mile, quicker to build and far more use.

HS2 wont be cancelled.
Postponed, de-specified, done in small and slow sections, reviewed, re-evaluated, almost certainly, but actually cancelled, I doubt it.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: ellendune on January 17, 2020, 02:13:55 pm
If HS2 cancelled surely Okehampton Tavistock would be cheaper per mile, quicker to build and far more use.

Unfortunately the BCR for Oakhampton to Tavistock is not looking good either.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: grahame on January 17, 2020, 06:28:55 pm
please delete, cat trod on laptop.

Such a shame to loose that memory ..


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: phile on January 17, 2020, 08:17:02 pm
please delete, cat trod on laptop.

Such a shame to loose that memory ..

Will you be able to carry on after a short paws


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: mjones on January 17, 2020, 08:56:42 pm
If HS2 cancelled surely Okehampton Tavistock would be cheaper per mile, quicker to build and far more use.

A much smaller scheme, on a completely different corridor,  carrying vastly fewer passengers,  delivering vastly less additional capacity... in what way could it be "far more use"? They aren't alternatives to each other; the case for each stands or falls on their own merits.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: broadgage on January 17, 2020, 09:20:41 pm
please delete, cat trod on laptop.

Such a shame to loose that memory ..

Will you be able to carry on after a short paws

Was not even my cat ! neighbours must be out for the day and their cat visited, as she does when no children are available to entertain her at home.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: PhilWakely on January 17, 2020, 09:24:14 pm
Getting back on topic after the above cat-astrophe......

An update from Devon Live (http://), posted yesterday afternoon:

Quote
Why a 'Dawlish avoiding' train line in the South West won't happen

The injury to a passenger after a wave smashed the windows of a train travelling past Dawlish has once again re-opened the debate about whether there needs to be a rail line that avoids the sea.

When built back in the 1840s, the difficult terrain inland between Exeter and Newton Abbot led Isambard Kingdom Brunel to adopt a coastal route for the South Devon Railway ...

Actually a very long article showing all the various options and all the official responses - good to see it all together in one place (pity about the advert infestation, but then that's what pays for the page, I guess!)


To put it rather more succinctly.................... It won't happen because Dawlish is not in the North of England [the land of the New Tory']


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: TaplowGreen on January 17, 2020, 09:46:42 pm
please delete, cat trod on laptop.

Such a shame to loose that memory ..

Will you be able to carry on after a short paws

Was not even my cat ! neighbours must be out for the day and their cat visited, as she does when no children are available to entertain her at home.

Perhaps the cat was trying to articulate her views on the new IET, and/or on train catering? 😉


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: SandTEngineer on January 20, 2020, 03:31:20 pm
Revised plan issued by NR today (20/01/2020):
https://www.networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/news/network-rail-unveils-updated-plan-to-protect-vital-south-west-rail-line-bordered-by-steep-cliffs-and-the-sea

...and this from the BBC:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-devon-51173064/fly-through-reveals-new-dawlish-rail-plans

Quote
Network Rail unveils updated plan to protect vital south west rail line bordered by steep cliffs and the sea
Region & Route: Western

Updated proposals published for changes to the rail line in south Devon which needs to be better protected from cliff falls, land slips and damage caused by extreme weather
Public consultation now open until 1 March for local communities across the south west to help shape the final design of the scheme

Six-week consultation includes details of the plans to realign the railway to make room for corrective measures to stabilise the cliffs

The updated plans mean most of the beach is retained with improved leisure access and amenities including new, fully accessible coastal walking routes

Updated proposals have today (20 January) been published for a series of potential changes to a section of railway line in south Devon that is bordered by steep cliffs on one side and the sea on the other.

Views are being sought from residents, communities, businesses and rail users across the south west as part of a second round of public consultation which runs for six weeks until 1 March as Network Rail looks to protect a 1.8km stretch of railway between Parsons Tunnel, near Holcombe, and Teignmouth.

The vital rail artery is the only line which connects Cornwall and Devon with the rest of the country and the plans would see the railway realigned away from hazardous cliffs.

The updated design means that most of the beach is retained as it only moves the railway away from the most potentially hazardous areas of the cliffs and keeps the existing railway alignment at both Parsons Tunnel and at Teignmouth end of this stretch of railway.

A realigned coastal footpath, which is 1m wider and safer than the current South West Coast Path, as it will have edge protection, will also be built with the new coastal path not extending any further out than the current extent of Sprey Point.

Further, a landward footpath will also be created with the new enhanced coastal path with more than 1km of new path with full coastal views will be added to the landward side of the railway between Holcombe and Sprey Point, where users can cross over the railway on a new, accessible footbridge.

The vulnerable section of railway was closed for six weeks following a landslide in 2014 and it needs to be better protected from cliff falls, landslips and damage caused during extreme weather.

Residents are invited to provide feedback on the proposals to help finalise the designs. The detailed proposals are available online at www.networkrail.co.uk/SouthWestRRP

Starting today in Dawlish Warren, 11 consultation events in and around the local area will enable people to find out more, ask questions and express their views. It is possible to respond to the consultation online, by email or in writing via a freepost feedback form.

Mike Gallop, route director for Network Rail’s Western route, said: “We have listened to feedback from the first round of consultation and our updated plans will ensure a resilient railway line for the whole south west while maintaining most of the beach and adding improved walking and leisure facilities.

"The railway is a vital artery to the South West, which communities, businesses and visitors to the region depend on for connecting with the rest of the UK. We welcome views on our updated proposals before we apply for consent to undertake the work.”

For the proposal to go ahead Network Rail need to make an application for a Transport and Works Act Order (TWAO) to the Secretary of State for Transport in order to secure the necessary permissions and rights to carry out the works.

The TWAO is likely to be submitted later this year once feedback is received from this round of public consultation.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: stuving on January 20, 2020, 03:42:56 pm
That's not about Dawlish you known - try here (http://www.firstgreatwestern.info/coffeeshop/index.php?topic=21746.msg280024#msg280024).


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: SandTEngineer on January 20, 2020, 06:23:31 pm
That's not about Dawlish you known - try here (http://www.firstgreatwestern.info/coffeeshop/index.php?topic=21746.msg280024#msg280024).

OK, I give in.  Mines a bit further along the coast........ ::) :P

Whatever, its pretty dramatic work.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: plymothian on January 28, 2020, 05:01:27 pm
Class 143s have now joined Voyager "do not go there" status.

From now on, any class 143 traversing the sea wall during Network Rail's Dawlish Amber or worse statuses must be locked out of public use between Exeter St Davids and Newton Abbot.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: chuffed on January 28, 2020, 05:22:50 pm
Couldn't they save some money by running them, getting them filled full of rocks pebbles & sand and then scuttling them (to pinch a nautical expression). cover them in chicken wire and concrete...and hey presto ...new sea wall and footpath !


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: eightonedee on January 28, 2020, 08:00:19 pm
...or if you are brave, a floatation ring and an outboard motor so they can double up for the Starcross Exmouth leg of the proposed new Exe Estuary circular sevice mooted elsewhere today and cope with a bit of wet at Dawlish


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: SandTEngineer on February 22, 2020, 04:56:02 pm
Video of the progress with the sea wall strengthning at Dawlish station here: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=sMjXJ-zj7DA


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: REVUpminster on May 22, 2020, 05:11:09 pm
Out today.
The plans for the latest section of the new sea wall, which runs for 415m between Coastguards and Colonnade breakwaters, includes a new taller sea wall incorporating a high-level wider and safer public promenade, pedestrian access to the beach and footbridge to link the two parts of the sea wall and an accessible station footbridge with lifts.
The reconstruction of the timber seaward platform at Dawlish station will also improve accessibility, making it easier for passengers to get on and off trains at the Grade II listed station, which is used by more than half a million people each year.(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49922801783_df1ab87493_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2j4vpFM)Dawlish station and the seawall.2 (https://flic.kr/p/2j4vpFM) by Robert (https://www.flickr.com/photos/revupminster/), on Flickr

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49922801853_61c9d9dfb7_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2j4vpGZ)Dawlish station and the seawall (https://flic.kr/p/2j4vpGZ) by Robert (https://www.flickr.com/photos/revupminster/), on Flickr


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: SandTEngineer on May 22, 2020, 05:54:07 pm
The actual NR press release can be seen here: https://www.networkrail.co.uk/running-the-railway/our-routes/western/south-west-rail-resilience-programme/dawlish-sea-wall-section-two


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Celestial on May 22, 2020, 06:22:46 pm
Good to see everyone seems to be socially distancing in those impressions. 


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: CyclingSid on May 22, 2020, 06:49:05 pm
Meanwhile further down the line, more muttering in the undergrowth https://inews.co.uk/news/network-rail-protests-brunel-great-western-railway-teignmouth-devon-2861359 (https://inews.co.uk/news/network-rail-protests-brunel-great-western-railway-teignmouth-devon-2861359)


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on May 22, 2020, 07:03:50 pm
I see we’ve still got at least 3 parallel discussions running about the sea wall.

Any chance we could put them all in the same sub forum, (probably “London to the west” as that seems more strategic than “Shorter journeys in Devon”).

http://www.firstgreatwestern.info/coffeeshop/index.php?topic=21705.0

http://www.firstgreatwestern.info/coffeeshop/index.php?topic=21746.0

Then the question is do we even need separate discussions about Holcombe beach section, Dawlish West section, and this latest Dawlish Station and East area?

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: eightonedee on May 22, 2020, 08:51:38 pm
... but from the graphics, restoration of old FGW train liveries and class 153 trains! ;D


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: grahame on May 24, 2020, 07:36:02 am
I see we’ve still got at least 3 parallel discussions running about the sea wall.

Any chance we could put them all in the same sub forum, (probably “London to the west” as that seems more strategic than “Shorter journeys in Devon”).

There is a natural coming together ... I have identified threads with  34, 15, 9 and 25 posts in them and lead awake all night (not!) worrying about the best way to bring the discussions together.

Putting them all in the same sub-forum would look good initially - however, as posting continued on some but not others they would get separated again as some slipped down the page.  I have been slightly more draconian - I have locked the three shorter threads and left this longer and most active (in the last few days) one open ... with a link on the end of each of those threads to here.

The threads in question are: 

http://www.passenger.chat/21746
Shorter Journeys in Devon
Consultation on Phase 2 of the South Devon Seawall resilience work

http://www.passenger.chat/21705
Shorter Journeys in Devon
Work starts on Phase 1 of the South Devon Seawall resilience work (Dawlish section)

http://www.passenger.chat/21014
London to The West
Dawlish solution - add 2.5m to the sea wall

This thread is:
London to The West / 22771
Dawlish to be renamed Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions

As a shared resource between London to The West, The West to the Midlands and the north (Cross Country) and local traffic within Devon - all major flows - the saa wall will always be a difficult topic to know where to place.  The way I've made the changes has left pointers in place to help people from all interest flows find this.

Original sea wall, collapse, initial short term fixes, alternative routes by burrowing under the hills and on reopening via Okehampton and Tavistock each have their own threads which remain separate and open.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on May 24, 2020, 12:06:28 pm
Thanks Grahame,

I appreciate I was possibly asking a lot...

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: TonyN on May 25, 2020, 09:18:51 am
The part around Dawlish station Looks like a big Job even without allowing for Tides and weather holding up the job.
Pat and Mick could be keeping the pubs in Dawlish in Business for a few years. And good luck finding one that actually has real ale.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: GBM on May 25, 2020, 09:23:30 am
The part around Dawlish station Looks like a big Job even without allowing for Tides and weather holding up the job.
Pat and Mick could be keeping the pubs in Dawlish in Business for a few years. And good luck finding one that actually has real ale.
Or even currently open!


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on June 29, 2020, 01:58:48 pm
The planning application for Dawlish phase 2, “Coastguards to Colonnades” has been made available on Teignbridge council planning website.

Application reference:  20/00933/NPA
Address:  Coastguards Breakwater To Colonnades Breakwater And Dawlish Railway Station, Station Road, Dawlish, Devon, EX7 9PJ

As well as all the usual plans etc, there’s a “Buildability Report” in the documents section which is a very useful explanation of exactly how they intend to build it, mainly piled wall construction, working from a device like a jack up barge known as a “wave walker”.

(I haven’t provided any links because they usually time out...)

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: bobm on July 26, 2020, 10:46:57 am
Latest view of the works between Kennaway Tunnel and Dawlish station

(http://www.mbob.co.uk/rforum/dawwork.jpg)


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on July 27, 2020, 08:15:22 pm
I’ve been watching this on the webcam, and it’s basically complete, at least in terms of its functionality as a sea wall.  They’ve been finishing the walkway concreting over the last few days, as shown in bobm’s recent photo, and a temporary fence is being installed.   All the major machinery has been taken away by sea.

It’s supposed to be open to the public from tomorrow, but they’re starting again in September to fit the permanent railings on the trackside, and a few other things such as lighting.

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on July 28, 2020, 11:16:42 am
Opened to public today as hoped, just a week or so late.

Link to Dawlish Beach Cams live stream on YouTube:
https://youtu.be/sKQJEL-xjjc

I believe this is only online until Aug 1st.

(Edit - Seems they intend to cycle through the different live cams, changing each week.)

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Bmblbzzz on July 28, 2020, 02:27:13 pm
At the very instant I clicked on that, an IET was going by! Serendipity!


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on July 28, 2020, 02:53:11 pm
Network Rail media centre story:

Quote
It means the beach and promenade is now open (28 July) with Network Rail adding finishing touches to the surface of the footpath, before returning later in the year to finish fencing, lighting and seating after delays caused by coronavirus.

The new bigger sea wall runs for 360 metres along Marine Parade, giving the iconic stretch of railway line immediate greater resilience against waves that flood the track, leading to potential closures and delays.

Network Rail has faced delays of crucial materials for the new sea wall throughout the pandemic, but teams of engineers worked around the clock in recent weeks, within Government guidelines, to enable the reopening of the beach and promenade in time for the peak tourism season.

The footbridge that connects Marine Parade to Boat Cove is also open but delays mean engineers will continue to work 24 hours a day for three weeks during the summer to install granite paving at Boat Cove and the viewing point halfway along the wall. Permanent fencing will then be fitted between the railway and the promenade. Then, following the summer engineers will install lighting and seating.

https://www.networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/news/vital-rail-link-to-the-south-west-now-better-protected-as-first-section-of-new-dawlish-sea-wall-built


Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on August 14, 2020, 12:42:31 pm
NR have started adding the permanent trackside fencing at the station end of the sea wall.  Head height as per the planning application.

Looks like rumours of the contractors having a 5 week break were wide of the mark.  I always thought what was probably meant was that “interference with the beach” would cease for the holiday period, but minor work would go on.

https://youtu.be/lZ1aRKKn4nQ

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on September 12, 2020, 01:57:56 pm
Not reported previously I think, but Teignbridge district have now approved the Dawlish phase 2 works, (Coastguards to Collonades and Dawlish station section), the detailed letter on their planning website dates from 01 Sep.

Planning details can be found here, there are a few updated drawings:

Application reference:  20/00933/NPA
Address:  Coastguards Breakwater To Colonnades Breakwater And Dawlish Railway Station, Station Road, Dawlish, Devon, EX7 9PJ

https://www.teignbridge.gov.uk/planning/planning-applications-and-appeals/view-and-comment-on-planning-applications-and-appeals/

The Network Rail webpage has also been updated to reflect approval:

https://www.networkrail.co.uk/running-the-railway/our-routes/western/south-west-rail-resilience-programme/dawlish-sea-wall-section-two/

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Surrey 455 on September 26, 2020, 07:12:49 pm
From BBC news (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-54297969) with photos
Quote
A railway line that washed into the sea in 2014 will be protected "for generations to come" by a new wall, Rail Minister Chris Heaton-Harris said.
The minister officially opened the first section of the new structure in Dawlish, Devon, on Friday.
The wall forms part of an ?80m Network Rail project to safeguard the line which connects Devon and Cornwall with the rest of the rail network.
Repairs to the track, damaged in storms six years ago, cost ?40m.
Mr Heaton-Harris said: "Our investment in this new sea wall will provide a resilient railway for generations to come, delivering for the thousands of passengers that rely upon this vital link every day, and the residents whose homes and businesses must be protected.

Continues..........."


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Jamsdad on October 15, 2020, 05:46:50 pm
More delays..
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-54538258

It is not that difficult to engineer a gentle slope into the sea in front of the wall to ensure a sandy beach is still present. Sadly few people in the general public have much understanding of soft sediment coastal engineering!


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: REVUpminster on October 22, 2020, 10:48:19 am
More delays..
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-54538258

It is not that difficult to engineer a gentle slope into the sea in front of the wall to ensure a sandy beach is still present. Sadly few people in the general public have much understanding of soft sediment coastal engineering!

The engineers got it wrong at Dawlish Warren and doesn't inspire confidence.

https://www.devonlive.com/news/devon-news/environment-agency-admits-made-dawlish-3660561

The only way to secure the railway is to remove any physical connection with the cliff face.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50490314892_c160f4a14d_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2jVE4yy)dlr - Copy (https://flic.kr/p/2jVE4yy) by Robert (https://www.flickr.com/photos/revupminster/), on Flickr

Picasso knocked this up for me. Retains the beach except for the piers. If the cliff face is cut back there would be more beach for the rocks to fall on.



Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: GBM on October 25, 2020, 10:11:01 am
Sorry, Picasso?  Your dog is called that!  ;D ;D


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: IndustryInsider on October 31, 2020, 01:41:04 pm
In addition to the sea wall works, the ?Dawlish Special Mode? has now been enabled on the Class 802 fleet.  Basically drivers engage it when instructed to and if a main circuit earthing is detected it allows up to ten engine restart attempts (rather than the normal two) before the engine goes out of service.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: grahame on October 31, 2020, 01:53:41 pm
In addition to the sea wall works, the 'Dawlish Special Mode' has now been enabled on the Class 802 fleet.  Basically drivers engage it when instructed to and if a main circuit earthing is detected it allows up to ten engine restart attempts (rather than the normal two) before the engine goes out of service.

I would have read that with a pinch of salt ... except that I read elsewhere that a number of IETs have engines shut down at the moment and "more trains than normal requiring maintenance" at the same time.  Seeing that reason on JourneyCheck when there's a reduced timetable - few superfasts and fewer Cardiff services (Parkway these weeks) suggests there's something more than just the standard ebb and flow of trains coming in to be looked after. 


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on November 09, 2020, 02:09:39 pm
Visible work on phase 2 now seems to have started, with heavy plant operating on the beach alongside the station to build a raised refuge area for storage between tides.  Not sure if a main contractor has been confirmed yet, although I only did a very quick search on Google.

However the ?wave walker? (the self positioning jack up barge mentioned in the planning application) has arrived on site.

Paul



Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: infoman on November 10, 2020, 07:06:52 am
BBC Spotlight news for the South West of England are reporting on the arrival of the oil type platform on site at 06:55am on tuesday morning as mentioned above

No film footage shown,might get some on the 13:30pm lunch time news or the 18:30pm evening news.

Just a reminder, as always, BBC local news is available for TWENTY FOURS only.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Thatcham Crossing on November 10, 2020, 08:01:33 am
Dawlish Beach Cams have a video up of some of the aforementioned prep work and the arrival of the "wave walker" here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-2hBedMZpw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-2hBedMZpw)

Old shipping containers being used to build a protective area for plant.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: chuffed on November 10, 2020, 11:54:49 am
Wouldn't some old pacer units have worked just as well ?? :P


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: ellendune on November 10, 2020, 09:09:44 pm
Wouldn't some old pacer units have worked just as well ?? :P

They don't stack in the same way


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: stuving on November 10, 2020, 10:09:08 pm
I was disappointed. I expected at least stretcher bond.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Thatcham Crossing on November 11, 2020, 07:53:17 am
Some great aerial footage of the wave walker on this which just came up in my YT feed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMRGIuAKkvU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMRGIuAKkvU). It's big!

Dawlish Beach Cams have also posted this one of how it moves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yM8XILynlAU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yM8XILynlAU).


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on November 11, 2020, 02:35:12 pm
Seems now that it is BAM Nuttall that have got the contract for phase 2, as they did for phase 1.

Here is their news item, dated 10th Nov:
https://www.bamnuttall.co.uk/news/wave-walker/

Quote
Network Rail has started work on the second section of the new, bigger sea wall at Dawlish, Devon, to protect the railway and town from rising sea levels, and extreme weather, for generations to come. Construction of this next section of the ?80 million upgrade will take around two years to complete and follows years of detailed studies, designs and joint working between world-leading marine, coastal and railway engineering experts.
The first part, from Dawlish station to the Coastguard breakwater east of the station is expected to be completed in late 2021.The final part between the station and the Colonnade breakwater, which will link up the new wall at Marine Parade, will start to be built shortly after.

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: broadgage on November 13, 2020, 06:39:04 pm
Wouldn't some old pacer units have worked just as well ?? :P

No they are too flimsy, the first good wave would detach the bus body from the goods wagon frame.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: southwest on November 14, 2020, 12:35:12 am
More delays..
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-54538258

It is not that difficult to engineer a gentle slope into the sea in front of the wall to ensure a sandy beach is still present. Sadly few people in the general public have much understanding of soft sediment coastal engineering!

That's not the entire issue, people don't want to lose the beach entirely(as was proposed), the old walkway and spray point would also be lost.  Local people have the right to speak up, they have to live there day in & day out and their opinions should be respected.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on November 21, 2020, 04:34:16 pm
I notice from the Dawlish beach cam video that the inner wall opposite Marine Parade now has most of its artificial stone cladding fitted (on the railway side).  I do think it looks a lot better now, according to the planning application it was supposed to try and match the low wall on the pavement, as seen from Marine Parade. 

https://youtu.be/xsD21zBb73o

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Thatcham Crossing on November 22, 2020, 10:31:59 am
That stone cladding appears to have been added in sections overnight during the course of the last week or so, from my observations (only via the webcam, I am in West Berks but have been to Dawlish a few times during the course of this year so know the layout of the new sea wall).

Would be nice if the other webcam (east of the Station) was online so that we could see the Waverider in action.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: paul7755 on November 22, 2020, 11:12:26 am
I reckon the other camera you?re thinking of is too far along, so it doesn?t *see* any of the work area. I think it?s the north side of Coastguards bridge, which is the limit of the phase 2 work area.

Paul


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: plymothian on November 22, 2020, 07:16:48 pm
That's right, the original camera (now known as San Remo) is further north from Dawlish station and faces towards Exeter, very close to where the line was washed away.

The newer cam (known as the Blenheim, as it's fixed on the Blenheim Hotel) is south of the station and faces towards Teignmouth.

The even newer cam (Brunel Holiday Park) overlooks Dawlish Warren station.

All are essentially fixed closed circuit television cameras and therefore cannot be moved unless they were unmounted and remounted in a new position.


Title: Re: Dawlish - permanent resilience work - ongoing discussions
Post by: Thatcham Crossing on November 23, 2020, 08:53:19 am
Thanks for the responses.

Yes, it was the San Remo camera I was thinking of, but didn't realise that looks beyond where the next stage of the work is to be carried out.






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