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All across the Great Western territory => Buses and other ways to travel => Topic started by: stuving on July 29, 2021, 06:49:06 pm



Title: And, for longer distances ...
Post by: stuving on July 29, 2021, 06:49:06 pm
This could belong on several boards of the forum (or none, arguably). Have you seen what your man Shapps has been up to (https://www.gov.uk/government/news/lift-off-for-uk-spaceflight-as-regulations-passed)? Launching the Space Industry Regulations 2021 No. 792 (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2021/9780348223682/contents), that's what.
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Another step towards space exploration from UK soil has been unlocked, with the passing of the spaceflight regulations, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has announced today (29 July 2021).

The legislation provides the framework to regulate the UK space industry and enable launches to take place from British soil for the very first time. It will unlock a potential £4 billion of market opportunities over the next decade, creating thousands of jobs and benefiting communities right across the UK.

This also puts the UK in a unique position as the first country in Europe able to launch spacecraft and satellites from home soil. This could lead to better monitoring of climate change, as well as improved data for satellite navigation systems, improving journeys right here on the ground, too.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said:

    We stand on the cusp of the new commercial space age, and this is the ‘blast off’ moment for the UK’s thriving space industry, demonstrating government’s commitment to put Britain at the global forefront of this sector.

    These regulations will help create new jobs and bring economic benefits to communities and organisations right across the UK, helping us to level up as we inspire the next generation of space scientists and engineers.

Today’s announcement comes alongside the formal appointment of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) as the industry regulator. With nearly 50 years of aviation regulation experience, the CAA has a wealth of experience and a proven track record in overseeing the aviation sector in the UK, which is one of the safest in the world, as well as experience in regulating rocket activities under the Air Navigation Order 2016.

I can't say I've read the draft order in detail - it's 157 pages, and you'd also need to have read the 88 pages of the Space Industry Act 2018, which the order puts into effect. But on a quick look, I can't see any mention of passenger or user groups having a role.

Allegedly, one of the potential choices for a launch site is Newquay. Do you think that would alter the way recent polls of favourite places to live in Britain have been monopolised by Cornwall? If so, which way?


Title: Re: And, for longer distances ...
Post by: Lee on July 29, 2021, 08:17:49 pm
This could belong on several boards of the forum (or none, arguably). Have you seen what your man Shapps has been up to (https://www.gov.uk/government/news/lift-off-for-uk-spaceflight-as-regulations-passed)? Launching the Space Industry Regulations 2021 No. 792 (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2021/9780348223682/contents), that's what.

My wife, who is an Irish, and therefore EU, citizen despite never having set foot in the Republic, and only spent 6 months in the North where she was born, would like it to be made known that it'sYer Man Shapps, actually...


Title: Re: And, for longer distances ...
Post by: stuving on July 29, 2021, 08:21:12 pm
I've just checked in the government's new "Decarbonising Transport" plan. I can't find any mention of decarbonising space travel. Presumably something like the offsetting proposed for aviation will apply:
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Residual emissions from the aviation sector will need to be offset by credible, verifiable and demonstrable additional offsets that would see an equivalent amount of carbon removed from the atmosphere. Our Jet Zero Consultation will consider how existing market-based mechanisms such as the UK ETS and CORSIA, as well as innovative greenhouse gas removal technologies, can address residual emissions.

At least using hydrogen to fuel rockets is a known viable technology.


Title: Re: And, for longer distances ...
Post by: CyclingSid on July 30, 2021, 06:44:24 am
Is that hydrogen, or hydrazine a very different (and nasty) beast?


Title: Re: And, for longer distances ...
Post by: stuving on July 30, 2021, 10:30:54 am
Is that hydrogen, or hydrazine a very different (and nasty) beast?

Hydrogen has been used in all the upper stages of NASA's and Ariane's big launchers. But its use does make the design of the cryogenic parts harder, most notably the turbopumps. The new generation of "commercial" makers (Bezos and Musk) prefer methane.



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