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Journey by Journey => South Western services => Topic started by: stuving on January 20, 2023, 18:54:16



Title: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on January 20, 2023, 18:54:16
What were these guys up to, do you think? The pictures (during and after) aren't new - they date from two years ago, when work on the upgraded (now residing) siding began. But what's the purpose of whatever they built underground?


Title: Re: Wokingham ... ?
Post by: Surrey 455 on January 20, 2023, 19:53:25
Drainage?


Title: Re: Wokingham ... ?
Post by: IndustryInsider on January 20, 2023, 21:43:25
For cabling going under the tracks isn’t it?


Title: Re: Wokingham ... ?
Post by: stuving on January 21, 2023, 17:12:35
My initial though was that those plastic cylinders look like the manifolds that sit under drain covers leading down to inspection chambers. These were big enough to provide manholes. But there's no sense in having a drain there, and that pipe sitting across the tracks must be a red herring.

It turns out they are called UTX chambers, and that running wires under the track is another area of railway infrastructure that's got bigger (and more expensive) and one hopes better too. The first of two later pictures suggests that, and, when I zoom the original image right in, that marker post even has "electric cables" written on it.

Oddly, that marker vanished in later tidying up, and it does look as if the cables had to be put in before the civils work was finished. The same is true behind the left-hand one, where the cables have to run along the nearside of the line towards Crowthorne. There was a conduit built across to join the old lineside conduit, and now a new one is being installed. All the trees and bushes have gone too.

All of this is of course for the Feltham and Wokingham resignalling project (https://www.networkrail.co.uk/running-the-railway/our-routes/wessex/feltham-and-wokingham-re-signalling-programme/). The Feltham part is largely done, but Wokingham's area will take until next year. There is one effect so far that passengers might notice - and I don't imagine they'll be pleased. Even as a manual box Wokingham could have had remote control of distant points, but it in the past this wasn't done for the crossovers at Bracknell and Blackwater. They remained with ground frames, and kept locked except for engineering works.

The Bracknell crossover is now controlled from the Wessex Rail Operating Centre (Basingstoke), so it can be used for routinely reversing trains. And from last December three evening trains do that, and no longer Run to Wokingham and Reading. The last two trains do still run through, but L-2 and L-6 terminate and run ECS to Staines, while L-4 runs there in service. For trains from Reading to Ascot, just one (L-2) has been lost.

Now, it was already possible to terminate and reverse trains at Wokingham - but I don't think that was ever part of the service pattern. (With no printed timetables to collect, I can't be sure.) Some complaints are starting to appear, but it's a bit odd for the Bracknell MP to be involved.


Title: Re: Wokingham ... ?
Post by: IndustryInsider on January 21, 2023, 18:46:03
Yeah I thought it was for cabling.  As you say it looks more like for water or sewerage!


Title: Re: Wokingham ... ?
Post by: stuving on January 21, 2023, 19:41:10
Yeah I thought it was for cabling.  As you say it looks more like for water or sewerage!
Made by the same companies as for drainage too. So are the "pipes" that run under the tracks, but they too have got more sophisticated, being divided into several separate channels.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on January 21, 2023, 20:10:43
The contractors working on this sort of resignalling programme are getting quite keen to publicise it (and themselves). Since they have to explain what the whole project is, often it sounds as if they are doing more that is the case. Here the civils are (they say) the work of Global Rail Construction (https://www.theglobalinfrastructuregroup.com/projects/feltham-resignalling-project-phases-3-4-advanced-civils/), and the signalling per se by Atkins (aka SNC-Lavalin) "supported" by RT Infrastructure Solutions (https://www.rt-is.co.uk/project/feltham-re-signalling/) (i.e. they provide extra labour).

So far most of what we've seen here is the civils, including that UTX. GRCL say they had to do 16 of those, and 16 under roads, in one possession. However, I wonder about that as someone is out there right now digging a trench across Barkham Road at the level crossing. After breaking up the surface, the digging is being done by a bloke with a high-pressure hose and a big s(p)oil-sucker truck - plus lots of people standing around looking into the hole.

GRCL claim 26 location case hard standings, with walkways and handrails. We have one of those too, opposite the signal box. When they started that, I did wonder why the signallers needed a patio so much it was worth doing if there was no space next to their box. I also wondered why you'd build a patio with a hypocaust. But now we know it's all about grey boxes and conduit runs. Or it will be - so far it's only been used for dumping bent barrier arms.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 12, 2023, 20:18:15
Well, we're all getting ready for next week's unusual work on our level crossing. Unusual in that it's Monday-Friday, closing road and railway, and not including either weekend. Apparently it's timed to coincide with half-term - you don't think they have left those weekends clear for holiday travel via Gatwick do you? 

But I'm now wondering if it is really going to happen, and where to look for definitive information. (Note that the road closure is separate from the railway one (http://www.firstgreatwestern.info/coffeeshop/index.php?topic=27130.0), and not always included in NR's information.) The TRO was announced in the local papers (with diversion routes), and was in one.network, but it's now vanished. The closure of Star Lane crossing is still shown, but with no diversion route. And the council has no web page listing TROs - only Star Lane is on their Facebook page. I guess we'll find out later tonight.

Railway closures are publicised in several ways, and the local news media picked up on this one (so they do read TROs!). But most of us would never look unless we see one of those yellow signs by the roadside. So I was a very surprised to see this sign on 15th January: "Road closed 11.00pm Sat 28th Jan-10.00pm Fri 17th Feb". It took four days to correct that to "11.00pm-11.00pm/Fri 27th -Sun 29th Jan/11.00pm-10.00pm/Sun 12th-Fri 17th Feb". The TRO came out the same day. The sign vanished a week ago.

I also got another "Dear railway neighbour" letter to add to my large collection, and that had both the right dates in a table, and the scaremongering ones in its heading. Maybe that's what the first sign was based on. I suspect a lot of users of the crossing (most of whom are not railway neighbours) are in for a big surprise tomorrow, including some driving HGVs for which the diversion is very long. If it gets signposted, that is ...


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 13, 2023, 00:24:54
The work two weekends ago showed what that patio was really for: high-rise tin beehives. And these were not empty cabinets to be populated out in situ; they arrived with ID labels and all their contents fitted and wired up. In the picture, the one still dangling is for the level crossing controls, and the one in front of it the crossing power supply.

Along the line to Reading, there are several new signals (I see straight posts are so out of fashion!), some with mini-patios of their own. None of the station signals has been done yet, but some posts and handrails are in place nearby. Looking towards Crowthorne, there's a cranked post on the right this side of the existing signal, but maybe not by enough to shorten the long drag up to the crossing. On the left, that's a new signal and it's a straight post!

The final signal before the crossing is down on the right, an old one, and what's that inverted triangle beyond it? It looks like the back of a warning sign, perhaps for marauding leaves. Is anything else that shape?


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: CyclingSid on February 13, 2023, 06:58:27
I wondered what the "South Western Railways replacement" bus through Reading was as I came to work this morning.


Title: Re: Wokingham ... ?
Post by: Electric train on February 13, 2023, 07:08:53
Yeah I thought it was for cabling.  As you say it looks more like for water or sewerage!

UTX (Under Track Crossing) the Track Engineer requires UTX to be typically greater that 2.5 meters below track base level (track base is from the bottom of the ballast) 


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: IndustryInsider on February 13, 2023, 11:50:18
The final signal before the crossing is down on the right, an old one, and what's that inverted triangle beyond it? It looks like the back of a warning sign, perhaps for marauding leaves. Is anything else that shape?

That's a warning board for the PSR of 30mph that applies through Wokingham station.  You can just about make out the AWS magnet beyond it, which of course you don't get with adhesion warning boards.  Here's one from the other side (but not that one!): https://railsimroutes.net/driversguide/images/psr_warn_2.jpg


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 13, 2023, 12:55:22
The final signal before the crossing is down on the right, an old one, and what's that inverted triangle beyond it? It looks like the back of a warning sign, perhaps for marauding leaves. Is anything else that shape?

That's a warning board for the PSR of 30mph that applies through Wokingham station.  You can just about make out the AWS magnet beyond it, which of course you don't get with adhesion warning boards.  Here's one from the other side (but not that one!): https://railsimroutes.net/driversguide/images/psr_warn_2.jpg

That does make sense, even if most drivers have slowed down well before they get there. Having found out that the warning is meant to be about 1 km in advance for a 70-30 speed reduction, my initial reaction was "that sign can't be far enough away". But it can! For one thing the viewpoint on the footbridge is 220 m from the PSR change, and then a bit of zoom and foreshortening does the rest. The signal in the distance showing a green aspect is 1.7 km from the footbridge, so the warning sign is indeed 780 m away.

One bit of signalling that's already gone in at the station is new AWS magnets - pretty green ones. But today, there's a striking absence of any work being done, and no road closure over the crossing. And I have found no source of information on this.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: paul7575 on February 13, 2023, 14:36:53
One bit of signalling that's already gone in at the station is new AWS magnets - pretty green ones. But today, there's a striking absence of any work being done, and no road closure over the crossing. And I have found no source of information on this.
IIRC green AWS magnets are the version used in DC third rail traction areas. I think they’re stronger than the yellow versions used elsewhere?


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 13, 2023, 15:18:41
One bit of signalling that's already gone in at the station is new AWS magnets - pretty green ones. But today, there's a striking absence of any work being done, and no road closure over the crossing. And I have found no source of information on this.
IIRC green AWS magnets are the version used in DC third rail traction areas. I think they’re stronger than the yellow versions used elsewhere?

That's right. The field strength as specified is not much higher, but is sensed higher up (193 mm vs 150* mm). So two receivers, or a dual one, are needed for trains running in both DC and non-dc areas. The old ones that have just been replaced would also have been high strength ones, just not colour coded like these new Vortok ones. 

*PS: the two heights were 193 mm and 115 mm, but since 2012 both receiver types are specified at a range of heights. The traction-related fields to be ignored are not specified numerically.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 13, 2023, 20:42:08
But today, there's a striking absence of any work being done, and no road closure over the crossing. And I have found no source of information on this.

There is work on the station platform, and at the junction, though it's not the major level crossing work that was "promised". And the change of plan is in the EAS, which has a change date of 2/2/23. I guess this will now have to happen later:
Quote
WOKINGHAM LC WILL BE CLOSED TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FROM 0200 TO 0600 MONDAY AND 2200
FRIDAY TO 0400 SATURDAY

STAR LANE LC WILL BE CLOSED TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FROM 2300 SUNDAY 12TH TO 2200
FRIDAY 17TH

NR and WBC have been confusing people by the way they declare road closure times. This was the case for the second of the roadside sign9 above), and for the Star Lane crossing closure (from the WBC travel Facebook listing):
Quote
The closure will be in place on Star Lane level crossing from 12 – 17 February, 11pm – 10pm. This is to allow Network Rail to carry out Transport Authority works at level crossing.

The wording is NR's, I think, where someone seems to think those mean the same thing!
But it leads to the question:
Quote
11pm-10pm?
So it’s open for an hour a day?
Or is that 10am?
If the latter, they’ve got it closed at rush hour during the week the railway isn’t running trains, so car usage will be even higher than normal.




Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on January 04, 2024, 18:44:05
The NR page "Feltham and Wokingham re-signalling programme" (https://www.networkrail.co.uk/running-the-railway/our-routes/wessex/feltham-and-wokingham-re-signalling-programme/) has had a new bit dropped into it, that says:
Quote
Saturday 10 to Sunday 18 February – Reading to Bracknell and Guildford

In February 2024 engineers will work around the clock during a 9-day closure to turn on signals we previously installed in the Wokingham area. The closure extends from Reading to Ascot on Sunday 11, Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 February and from Guildford to Aldershot on Sunday 18 February.
Information about rail replacement buses

    Saturday 10 February –  buses running from Reading to Bracknell and Guildford.
    Sunday 11 February –  buses running from Reading to Ascot and Guildford.
    Monday 12 to Friday 16 February – buses running from Reading to Bracknell and Guildford.
    Saturday 17 February (before 19:30) – buses running from Reading to Bracknell and Guildford.
    Saturday 17 February (after 19:30) – buses running from Reading to Ascot and Guildford.
    Sunday 18 February – buses running from Reading to Ascot and Guildford Buses running from Aldershot to Guildford.

So the end is indeed nigh for my local signallers. Elsewhere, level crossings have been switched to CCTV control from the ROC before the signals are switched over, but I haven't seen anything about that here. Nor have I seen any OD sensors (radar/IR), which I think are still part of the plan. It may be that this last one is being done at the same time as everything else.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: bobm on January 04, 2024, 18:55:29
More details of the replacement services from GWR here - https://www.gwr.com/-/media/gwr-sc-website/files/travel-information/travel-updates/planned-engineering/2023/Rail-improvement-work-on-the-North-Downs-line-Saturday-10-to-Sunday-18-February-2024.pdf (https://www.gwr.com/-/media/gwr-sc-website/files/travel-information/travel-updates/planned-engineering/2023/Rail-improvement-work-on-the-North-Downs-line-Saturday-10-to-Sunday-18-February-2024.pdf)


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 03, 2024, 23:05:31
As expected, the heavy mob turned up to start work last weekend, at midnight on Friday. Since then they've been ripping out the old crossing stuff, and digging - still more - holes to fill with concrete. There was also some work being done on the track at the junction, though there can't be a lot they could do then since it's still in use until next weekend. Most of the work has been beside the track, but fenced off.

NR were lucky enough to find a dormant building site next door, and borrowed it for storing things. Big things, such as at least five big RRVs, most of then the caterpillar ones (ORRVs?). And on a couple of nights, with no work going, a low loader has turned up to remove or deliver one of those.

There is a picture put on line by NR (https://www.networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/news/tonight-signalling-upgrades-and-level-crossing-closures-in-wokingham-to-result-in-diversions-for-motorists) of a crossing crossing the crossing, which is a bit of a puzzle. It's not been installed, indeed the junction replacement can't logically be done until the 9-day blockade. So where have they hidden it? Most likely on a bit of spare land at the junction, which I can't currently look at as the footbridge (Tan Hill) has been demolished.(https://cdn.prgloo.com/media/6eba4bf1c4fc44a0a1ea3627521fe12f.jpg?width=1135&height=960)

And last night a couple of big trains turned up after midnight, and something noisy ensued. Today you could see that a bit of track has been ripped up, - though it will have to be be replaced by Monday. Closer examination shows this is the entrance to the siding. This is out of use for the duration, so a new switch can be put in with no signalling system to work it.

And the signallers have announced their departure.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: GBM on February 04, 2024, 09:22:36

And the signallers have announced their departure.
Which control centre now works Wokingham please?
Great pictures, thank you


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 04, 2024, 10:30:22

And the signallers have announced their departure.
Which control centre now works Wokingham please?
Great pictures, thank you

One more week to go, and then after the big switch-over it all goes to Basingstoke.

The last big change was introducing the colour light signals. I'm not sure when Wokingham's were done, but it must have been roughly when the Feltham box was switched on in 1974, replacing 45 mechanical boxes. That took three years to put in, so not so different from the latest resignalling. Wokingham box was already capable of working to Reading, Ascot, and North Camp at night (because there are no junctions that need operating), and had been with with semaphore signals.

When this box was built in 1933, it followed a lot of complaints from local councillors etc. about the length of crossing gate closures. They had been operated by the station's only porter who also collected tickets, and the new "mechanised" gates would have a capstan in the signal box. There was something indicated as "SB" on the maps before this, but perhaps it was only a cabin hidng a ground frame.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 06, 2024, 00:39:17
The track was all in place and ready for this morning's first ECS at 5 am, in fact well before that. The points are clipped, so the bits of missing rail are not an issue. The gap in the third rail is rather odd, though. The curves on that siding entrance have been eased a little, by shifting the points towards the station.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: Electric train on February 06, 2024, 11:06:14
  The gap in the third rail is rather odd, though.
If you mean the gaps by the switches (points) there are 2 reasons I can think of, first they look like HW point machines the drive rods protrude out and there is a risk of contact with the conrail forming a high impedance fault path also no conrail makes it easier to maintain the point ends and heater


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: IndustryInsider on February 06, 2024, 14:40:22
With the siding now electrified, does that count as the first step towards infill electrification to Aldershot South Junction? ;)


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 10, 2024, 23:59:48
As expected, Team Orange got really stuck in last night, tearing up the track. First to go was the point rodding, or at least part of it (photo 1). Next we see the junction being taken out and dug up, one piece at a time so as to allow trains and the rail crane to be used. In the background, track panels are being unloaded from the tilting transporter wagons.

To get a better view I had to find another vantage point to replace the demolished footbridge: on top of the car park, through a fine steel mesh. From there you can see Colas's Kirow crane, and a whole IKEA kit of track panels (I hope someone's got the instruction leaflet!). Tilting transporters can manage panels 3.7 m wide, but those in the foreground are a lot wider than that; how did they get here? Finally (photo 4), a little later, it's time to put in the new ballast and fit the first panel.

There's a lot of bits of rail to be joined there. If it's all done by thermit welding, those living on the houses by the line will enjoy a big firework display (though its timing may be a bit antisocial).


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 11, 2024, 23:54:19
By late afternoon, a section of new track has been put in, with two new motorised switches. But perhaps that should be called plain line, since the left-hand rail is continuous through places there should be a rail crossing. Less than twenty minutes later (photo 2), a slab of that new track has been hoicked out and now plain line is being laid round to the left, towards Bracknell, via a new track crossing on the other track.

Looking at how much track is still stacked up waiting to be used, it does seem that much of the track so far laid is temporary. So it seems the current method is to bring in an engineering train on one track, and rip out the rest, and replace the ballast with fresh. The final track panels are laid where possible, i.e. where remaining the old track is not in the way. In the gaps, temporary track panels are put down. to allow the remaining old track to be removed with a train alongside. Once all the new ballast is in place, even full-width track panels can be swapped in or out by crane from either end.

Close examination of the two big track panels in the foreground shows that the wider one, on top, fits just after the farther incomplete switch, and the one underneath comes after that. So there is a lot of temporary plain line where those panels will eventually be. The view from the footbridge at the station is of course highly foreshortened, disguising how long those panels are.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: Electric train on February 12, 2024, 07:00:19
By late afternoon, a section of new track has been put in, with two new motorised switches. But perhaps that should be called plain line, since the left-hand rail is continuous through places there should be a rail crossing. Less than twenty minutes later (photo 2), a slab of that new track has been hoicked out and now plain line is being laid round to the left, towards Bracknell, via a new track crossing on the other track.

Looking at how much track is still stacked up waiting to be used, it does seem that much of the track so far laid is temporary. So it seems the current method is to bring in an engineering train on one track, and rip out the rest, and replace the ballast with fresh. The final track panels are laid where possible, i.e. where remaining the old track is not in the way. In the gaps, temporary track panels are put down. to allow the remaining old track to be removed with a train alongside. Once all the new ballast is in place, even full-width track panels can be swapped in or out by crane from either end.

Close examination of the two big track panels in the foreground shows that the wider one, on top, fits just after the farther incomplete switch, and the one underneath comes after that. So there is a lot of temporary plain line where those panels will eventually be. The view from the footbridge at the station is of course highly foreshortened, disguising how long those panels are.

Normal practice on twin track is to use an adjacent one for engineering train(s) for scrap / waste and new ballast etc 

When those large panels go in place it be done with Kirow rail cranes


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 13, 2024, 23:52:37
Over Sunday/Monday night that remaining track (the Up Main) has been torn up and replaced by new ballast (and the last rodding has gone too). By yesterday morning, that Kirow crane was back and already a lot of the temporary track has been taken out (p1). By the time I got back it was well after dark, but in the fuzzy pictures I got did suggest all the new track was in place. So I missed all the fun! Though this gang of RRVS having a rest may have found it more like hard work (p2).

By midday today most of the debris had been cleared up (p3), and by late afternoon it was all remarkably clean (p4). The junction is in obvious need of a visit from the tamper, and not just because the view exaggerates the wiggliness. The wiggles in the vertical direction are exactly what tampers are meant for, but is there enough spring force in the rails to straighten them in the horizontal plane as well, when lifted and shaken?



Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: Electric train on February 14, 2024, 07:25:05
The junction is in obvious need of a visit from the tamper, and not just because the view exaggerates the wiggliness. The wiggles in the vertical direction are exactly what tampers are meant for, but is there enough spring force in the rails to straighten them in the horizontal plane as well, when lifted and shaken?



There may be some work left to be done with RRV's to dress and line up the rails.   The new track will not have been stressed and finally welded yet this will allow the Tamper to iron out wiggles; once stressed and welded there will be at least one  Tamper run booked in a few weeks after the line is reopened


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 14, 2024, 20:20:28
It's hard to see how true the track is now, there are so many people working on it, but it certainly looks better. A tamper did turn up late last night - or something bigger; I could only see a part of it sitting on the level crossing. My guess is it was an on-track finishing machine; that can straighten rails laterally (lining) too.

Exactly what all these small machines are doing I can't work out, but I'd expect cutting ends to leave the right gap, drilling holes for various reasons, and eventually stressing for when the final welds go in. After that comes grinding and other finishing, but no doubt there's more to it than I can think of. Track clips were being undone within the station this afternoon, which presumably relates to re-stressing. However, I'd expect that unclipping to be done after stress is applied.

On the other hand, the old junction was protected from rail stress by adjustment switches on all six tracks. I can't make out if the same is true now - partly because of all the bodies in the way. I did wonder if the insulated joints close to the level crossing would be replaced or removed now, as the down-side one at least is worn (i.e. loud ker-thump noises as a train runs in). With axle counters being used, IRJs are not needed, unless perhaps a few track circuits are retained for static detection.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 15, 2024, 22:38:48
Still a lot of work going on today, though most of the big bits are done. I was surprised to see signals being erected only now; it must be about time to start testing the new kit. A bloke who was labelled Atkins told me that the level crossing will not have object detection. I wonder whether the reliability of CCTV alone has been reassessed as better than it was before.

The track has, I think, been welded and stressed through the junction, along the straight direction - all I can see. For one thing, I can't now see any adjustment switches on the station side. There was one on the left, alongside the crossover switch on the right. And the insulated joints are still in place, but bypassed by bonding.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 18, 2024, 00:23:48
By yesterday (Friday) the orange crowds had mostly dispersed, apart from at the level crossing and some signalling work. The testing of the new signalling is not a very visible process.

During the week, as well as the track replacement at the junction, the level crossing was also removed and new equipment put in. This involved taking out the old concrete bases and pouring new ones in plywood boxes in very nearly the same place. Some more, slightly smaller, precast cubic bases were dropped in to hold the posts for new wigwags (p2).

A lot of new fencing has gone in all round the barrier machines, along the road and beside the track too. There it will close the side of the trespass guards (arris rails) - those were not removed until yesterday, which seems a bit odd. They have been put to one side, so presumably will be put back not renewed. And on that yellow-railed cabinet patio there is now a name board for the crossing. For some reason.

Today's main job was painting the crossing; more complicated than it sounds. That didn't finish until after the daylight had gone, so I'll show it when I've got a decent picture.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: ellendune on February 18, 2024, 08:15:59
And on that yellow-railed cabinet patio there is now a name board for the crossing. For some reason. 

If someone is reporting an incident at the crossing then you want them to use the right name.  It may be obvious in this case, but consistency is important.   


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: paul7575 on February 19, 2024, 10:51:06
Here’s the NR press release. Can anyone explain the relevance of the first photo to a resignalling project?
Quote
From Saturday 10 to Sunday 18 February, Network Rail completed the final phase of the resignalling work in the Wokingham area as part of the five-year £375m programme of work to bring the 1970s signalling equipment up to modern standards. 

During the most recent nine-day closure, engineers worked around the clock to install 43 new signals (traffic lights for the railway), as well as upgrade two level crossings at Wokingham station and Easthampstead Road (Star Lane) and renew a double railway junction at Wokingham.

Now complete, customers will benefit from a modern digitalised signalling system that will help improve train performance, increase future capacity, result in fewer delays, and enhance the safety of level crossings.

As part of the five-year programme, Network Rail moved control of the signalling equipment between Feltham and Wokingham and transferred it to Basingstoke, into the Rail Operating Centre (ROC), as well as upgraded 16 level crossings and installed 500 pieces of signalling equipment, which covers 80 miles of railway across Feltham, Hounslow, Shepperton, Twickenham, Windsor & Eton Riverside and Wokingham.

https://www.networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/news/network-rail-completes-final-phase-of-gbp-375m-investment-to-install-state-of-the-art-signalling-system-which-will-improve-the-reliability-of-the-line-between-feltham-and-wokingham

Paul


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: IndustryInsider on February 19, 2024, 11:04:55
Signalmaps, for one, has been updated to show nice colour lights, routes set and platform occupation already:

https://signalmaps.co.uk/#feltham:2074


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: bobm on February 19, 2024, 12:04:20
As has Open Trains

https://www.opentraintimes.com/maps/signalling/staines#T_WOKNGHM (https://www.opentraintimes.com/maps/signalling/staines#T_WOKNGHM)


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 19, 2024, 12:36:25
Signalmaps, for one, has been updated to show nice colour lights, routes set and platform occupation already:

https://signalmaps.co.uk/#feltham:2074

We already had new-fangled electric light signals! There must be some detailed changes to the signals layout, though I've not spotted any to check for in updated maps. Signalmaps does not show signal numbers, but it has changed the crossing from MCB to MCB-CCTV, following its up (or down, or sideways) -grade.

OTT does have the new BEFnnnn numbers - correctly, for the couple I know.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: IndustryInsider on February 19, 2024, 12:51:20
We already had new-fangled electric light signals! There must be some detailed changes to the signals layout, though I've not spotted any to check for in updated maps. Signalmaps does not show signal numbers, but it has changed the crossing from MCB to MCB-CCTV, following its up (or down, or sideways) -grade.

Yes, but the feed from the previous Train Describer was not able to show their status.



Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: AMLAG on February 19, 2024, 13:25:28


“Can anyone explain the relevance of the first photo to a resignalling project?”

The pic of what looks like bank stabilization works does seem irrelevant; probably another example of Network Rail’s Media Contractors’ Reputation Management efforts or should it be mismanagement efforts ?!




Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: IndustryInsider on February 19, 2024, 14:14:51
Perhaps a slight shame that the l-o-n-g sections through Sandhurst and Crowthorne didn't get an extra signal section added to reduce headways?  Though at least the signal numbering allows them to be inserted at a later date.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: Oxonhutch on February 19, 2024, 14:24:29
Though at least the signal numbering allows them to be inserted at a later date.

Along with the third rail? :)


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: GBM on February 21, 2024, 13:50:36
Cancellations to services at Wokingham
Due to a fault with barriers at a level crossing at Wokingham trains have to run at reduced speed on all lines.
Train services running through this station may be cancelled or delayed. Disruption is expected until 15:00 21/02.
Customer Advice
We are sorry for the delay to your journey today.


Can you tell me more about the incident?
There is a fault with lowering barriers at a road crossing at Wokingham. Network Rail staff are on site and looking to resolve the issue. Whilst this takes place trains will continue to run but at a reduced speed in the area.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: stuving on February 21, 2024, 20:33:16
SWR were showing the delay as at "a level crossing near Wokingham", and there are only two, both rebuilt last week. There were several orange minders at the station one when I was going for a train to Reading at 1 pm, so it was probably that one. Fortunately by that time trains had just started coming through again, in a bunch of those that had been waiting. I got one not visible on the CIS, since it had been told to run non-stop to Reading, though it did call.

And it had all been going so well .... for two days, anyway.


Title: Re: Wokingham resignalling
Post by: bobm on February 21, 2024, 20:53:37
Problems yesterday, although not down to the infrastructure, after the guard on a Reading bound train was assaulted at Wokingham station and the offender then fled across the tracks. 



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