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1  All across the Great Western territory / Buses and other ways to travel / Re: Widespread Ryanair cancellations in September and October 2017 on: Today at 11:32:19 AM
Another update, from the BBC:

Quote
Ryanair plans to make pilots change holidays


Boss Michael O'Leary at the Ryanair shareholder meeting

Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary has said the firm is planning to make pilots delay a week's holiday as it wrestles with massive flight cancellations.

His comments came at the airline's annual general meeting, which is being held in Dublin.

Ryanair is cancelling 40-50 flights every day for the next six weeks, after it admitted it had "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays.

A group of Ryanair pilots has rejected a cash bonus to work extra days.

Ryanair had offered captains a one-off payment of £12,000 or 12,000 euros, and first officers £6,000 or 6,000 euros, but they said they wanted new contracts and better working conditions instead.

Mr O'Leary told the AGM that Ryanair was facing a "significant management failure". He said pilots who had a four-week block of holidays coming up in the next few months because of rota changes would be told to take three weeks instead and have the other week in January. He said the firm did not need pilots' agreement for the change.

Mr O'Leary said the cancellations had cost Ryanair about 25 million euros (£22m).

He accused unions of trying to give the company "a bloody nose" and said staff did not want union representation.


2  All across the Great Western territory / Buses and other ways to travel / Re: Widespread Ryanair cancellations in September and October 2017 on: Today at 12:58:54 AM
Further developments, from the BBC:

Quote
Ryanair pilots reject bonus to work through cancellation crisis

A group of Ryanair pilots has rejected a cash bonus to work extra days after the airline cancelled 2,100 flights because it "messed up" crew holidays.

In a letter seen by the BBC, pilot representatives from 17 of the company's 80 or so European bases have told bosses that most are not enthused. They want new contracts and better working conditions instead.

Ryanair had offered captains a one-off payment of £12,000 or 12,000 euros, and first officers £6,000 or 6,000 euros. But the letter said: "The pilot market is changing, and Ryanair will need to change the ways which the pilots and management work together to ensure a stable and common future for everyone".

New contracts, it says, "should help stop the large number of colleagues who are leaving for "greener pastures". It also asks to bring in professional negotiators to help broker a deal. They have given the airline until tomorrow to respond.

One pilot told me that this is their one chance to improve conditions at work. The letter comes from staff based all over Europe including Germany, Italy, Holland, Belgium and Sweden.

In recent days I've been contacted by almost 20 current and former Ryanair pilots telling me that the company is losing unhappy crews quicker than it can replace them. They all told me that a shortage of pilots is the key reason why so many flights have had to be cancelled in recent days.

But it is a claim strenuously denied by the airline's boss Michael O'Leary.

It seems that, for the first time, scattered Ryanair pilot reps are joining forces in some numbers - often making contact over social media - because they have spotted a chance to collectively bargain for new, improved contracts.

I asked Ryanair what they made of the counter-offer but they haven't got back to me yet.

The big question now is, if pilots decide to escalate things, say, a work to rule for example, will Ryanair be able to get through the next few weeks without having to cancel yet more flights? At the weekend Ryanair decided to cancel 40 to 50 flights every day for the next six weeks.

Ryanair said earlier that it had sent out emails to 315,000 affected customers on Monday, telling them about flight changes, alternative flights, and refunds. It said the fiasco was down to its own mistaken decision to force its pilots to take their remaining annual leave before the end of the year, rather than by the end of the financial year next March.

This means it does not have enough pilots to crew all its scheduled flights this month and next.


3  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: Terror incident on London Underground train at Parsons Green station, 15 September 2017 on: Yesterday at 02:41:21 PM
It was the A30, not the M25: see this article, from the BBC.

4  Journey by Journey / Thames Valley Branches / Re: Henley line improvements - May 2017 on: Yesterday at 02:28:18 PM
Thank you for posting those details, SEPS - and a warm welcome to the Coffee Shop forum!  Smiley

5  Sideshoots - associated subjects / The Lighter Side / Re: Tin miners, their patron saint and an old bottle of beer - spot the connection! on: Yesterday at 02:14:54 PM
From the BBC:

Quote
What's it like to go down a disused 400-year-old tin mine?

South Crofty tin mine, near Camborne, is massive and was closed almost 20 years ago. But now a Canadian company, Strongbow, plans to open it back up.

The BBC's Environment Correspondent Claire Marshall went down to have a look.


6  All across the Great Western territory / Introductions and chat / Re: Home delivery services and the PDA characteristics on: September 19, 2017, 09:53:25 PM
The van ignition key is also a useful substitute.  Grin

It isn't when driving a Merc van. Tried it but as they don't have a traditional key, and don't have a pointy bit they don't work very well.

Agreed.  Wink

7  Sideshoots - associated subjects / The Lighter Side / Re: William Huskisson on: September 18, 2017, 11:54:28 PM
... and Harold Wilson (who I met) and Nigel Lawson (who I didn't).  Grin
8  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: Terror incident on London Underground train at Parsons Green station, 15 September 2017 on: September 18, 2017, 11:52:54 PM
An update, from the BBC:

Quote
Parsons Green: Tube staff's accounts of bomb 'pandemonium'



The driver of the train targeted in Friday's terror attack at Parsons Green Tube station has revealed the "pandemonium" which followed the explosion, in his official account.

A initial London Underground investigation into the incident, documented in a paper seen by the BBC, has given a snapshot of how staff reacted when an improvised bomb partially exploded in a train, injuring 30 people during the morning rush hour.

The report also revealed initial communications between the driver and the service controller were "hampered", while CCTV images showed "a scene of confusion and distress".

Here is the train driver's account, according to the London Underground report:
When he arrived at Parsons Green, he operated the train doors as normal and carried out his platform duties.
As he was about to shut the doors to depart, he noticed on the in-cab CCTV that a lot of passengers were running out of the rear car.
He immediately opened the cab door to find out what was happening.
Some passengers were shouting "fire" and others were shouting "it's an attack".
The train operator stated that he returned to the cab to raise a mayday alarm.
He asked for traction current to be switched off immediately.
He then returned to the platform and told passengers that were stuck on the platform due to the pandemonium and small size of the staircase to follow him.
He took the customers on to the track away from the trains via the ramp.
He took the customers as far as the sidings and instructed them to stay low and out of sight.
At this time there were about 50-70 people on the track with the train operator and because he was not sure what type of attack was going on, he returned to the station platform to get more information.
On arriving back on the platform, he was met by the station supervisor, who informed the train operator that a bomb had gone off in the last car.
The train operator returned to the sidings to lead the passengers on the track back to the station, and eventually out of the station.

Here is the station supervisor's account:
The supervisor and his staff were at the gateline when there was a sudden stampede of passengers from platform two.
Customers started jumping over the barriers to get out of the station.
The supervisor plunged the gates using the emergency button to keep all gates open.
He instructed his staff to continue to help people out of the station while he went to investigate the reason for the stampede.
After checking the station cameras, he saw that the platform was still very busy with people trying frantically to exit and others running on the tracks, the station supervisor put on his hi-vis and went to the platform.
However, the stairs were so busy and people were being trampled on by those pushing from behind to exit the platform.
The supervisor called his staff and together they helped the fallen and injured out of the station.
They went back and forth and kept calming the crowd, to walk orderly out of the station.
The supervisor was eventually able to get to the platform.
He had found out by enquiring from passengers, while helping them out of the station, that there had been an explosion and fire in the last car of the train on platform two.
The supervisor saw the train operator and informed him of the situation.
The service controller was informed while the train operator went back to the track to retrieve the passengers on the track with him.
The station supervisor continued to evacuate the platform as some passengers kept going to the burning item on the train in order to take pictures.


9  All across the Great Western territory / Buses and other ways to travel / Re: Widespread Ryanair cancellations in September and October 2017 on: September 18, 2017, 11:31:25 PM
Reading through previous posts in this topic, Norwegian Air confirm that they have recruited 140 pilots from Ryanair, and Norwegian Air are setting up a base in Dublin - Ryanair's home ground.

10  Sideshoots - associated subjects / The Lighter Side / Re: William Huskisson on: September 18, 2017, 11:01:13 PM
In view of my own interest in the story of William Huskisson MP, I have taken the liberty of adding links to the images used in the article quoted by Bmblbzzz in the original post in this topic.

William and I share the same birthday - 11 March.  Wink


11  Journey by Journey / Bristol Commuters / Re: Filton Abbey Wood - a great success? Emulate it just to the north?? on: September 18, 2017, 10:35:52 PM
I can imagine lifts at Nailsea & Backwell station.

However, the proposed building of a ramp access has been stalled, as it would apparently cost one million pounds - so the cost of installing lifts to both platforms would clearly be astronomic.  Roll Eyes

12  All across the Great Western territory / Buses and other ways to travel / Re: Various 'open-top bus conversion' incidents, usually involving railway bridges on: September 18, 2017, 07:44:24 PM
From the BBC:

Quote
Driver charged over Edinburgh hospital bus crash



The 21-year-old driver of a double-decker bus that crashed at an Edinburgh hospital, injuring eight people, has been charged with dangerous driving.

The roof of the bus was ripped off by an overhead walkway at the Western General Hospital on Sunday afternoon.

Six of the injured, men and women aged between 14 and 60, were taken to Edinburgh Royal Infirmary for treatment.

None of the injuries was thought to be life-threatening.

Police Scotland said the road was reopened on Sunday evening and a report would be submitted to the procurator fiscal.


13  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: Railway bridges struck by road vehicles - merged topic, ongoing discussion on: September 18, 2017, 07:29:37 PM
Another incident, reported by ITV News:

Quote
Stuck truck delays rush hour commuters


The lorry became wedged under a railway bridge during rush hour.

The lorry driver, carrying a fork hoist, brought trains in Romiley, Stockport, to a standstill after he got it wedged under a railway bridge.

The ‘avoidable gaffe’ resulted rush-hour delays to motorists and train users as police and Network Rail officials were called to Compstall Road at around 8.55am today.

They were acting on reports of a vehicle stuck under the bridge at Romiley Station, and trains between Romiley and Manchester were immediately stopped as a Network Rail engineer rushed to the scene. Once he confirmed the bridge had not been damaged, trains were resumed at 9.30am.

The incident caused delays of 37 minutes, plus knock-on delays as the network recovered after the line was declared safe and reopened. Thankfully no one was injured.

A spokesman for Network Rail said: “This kind of avoidable gaffe delays motorists and train customers. There are also potentially very serious safety consequences. “We’d urge drivers of all high vehicles to know for sure, rather than to hope, that their lorry or truck can fit under our bridges. “Transporting a forklift is even more reason to check your height before you drive.”


14  All across the Great Western territory / Buses and other ways to travel / Re: Widespread Ryanair cancellations in September and October 2017 on: September 18, 2017, 07:02:33 PM
A further development, reported by the BBC:

Quote
Ryanair to publish full list of cancellations



Ryanair customers whose flights are being cancelled, will receive an email by this evening informing them, chief executive Michael O'Leary has said.

The budget airline plans to cancel 40-50 flights every day for the next six weeks, after it admitted it had "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays.

The details of all the cancelled flights will be on the Ryanair website over the next 24 hours, the firm said.

Mr O'Leary said most people would still be able to fly on the same day. If not, they would be moved to flights the day before or the day after and the airline would meet its obligations over compensation.

The airline said it was cancelling flights at airports where it runs the busiest schedules, so it would be easier to accommodate passengers on alternative flights.

That will include flights operating out of the following airports: Barcelona, Brussels, Dublin, Lisbon, London Stansted, Madrid, Milan Bergamo, Porto and Rome Fiumi.

Mr O'Leary said around 400,000 passengers would be directly affected, but he said a decision had been made to disrupt the plans of 2% of travellers in order to offer a better service to the remaining customers.

Changes to the way the airline organises its holiday year have left Ryanair with a backlog of staff leave, meaning there is a shortage of pilots on standby over the next six weeks.

That meant any minor disruptions to flights were causing knock-on delays, because the airline did not have the flexibility it needed from back-up crews, said Mr O'Leary.

After 1 November, when the lighter winter schedule begins, there will not be any need for cancellations, he said.

He said they were also asking to buy back leave from pilots and alter the holiday schedule.

Mr O'Leary said Ryanair would honour all of its obligations to compensate passengers under EU regulations but would not book passengers onto flights with rival carriers.
"We will not pay for flights on other airlines, no. It is not part of the EU261 entitlement," he said, referring to European passenger rights legislation.

He said the airline did not have an overall shortage of pilots, but said they had "messed up" the rosters for September and October. "This is our mess-up. When we make a mess in Ryanair we come out with our hands up," he said. "We try to explain why we've made the mess and we will pay compensation to those passengers who are entitled to compensation, which will be those flights that are cancelled over the next two weeks."

If passengers are given more than 14 days notice of a cancellation, they are not entitled to compensation.


15  All across the Great Western territory / Introductions and chat / Re: Home delivery services and the PDA characteristics on: September 18, 2017, 06:40:03 PM
There is none.  It simply enables the driver to get to the final screen in the delivery sequence on the PDA, to 'confirm departure'.  Lips sealed

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