Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum Great Western Coffee Shop - [home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here].
Register and contribute [here] - it's free.
 today - Friends of Bridgwater Station
today - TW NorthWest / Liverpool
22/10/2018 - ACoRP board nominations close
29/10/2018 - Avocet line AGM
30/10/2018 - Minehaed Rail Link Group
31/10/2018 - CCIF Applications close
Random Image
Train Running @GWR Twitter Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail News GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4 Chat on off
October 18, 2018, 02:14:24 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[101] Andrew Haines speaking yesterday (16/10)
[90] Getting Electrification Right
[55] Isambird Kingdom Brunowl
[53] Temple Meads ranked one of the worst stations in UK for punctu...
[36] BBC Radio Devon 17/10
[34] Infrastructure problems in Thames Valley causing disruption el...
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
  Home Help Search Calendar Login Register  
  Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 220
1  All across the Great Western territory / Across the West / Re: Great Western Main Line electrification - ongoing discussion on: Yesterday at 03:05:52 pm
... delivery enhancement plan ...

I take it you meant the Enhancements Delivery Plan - but their delivery couldn't half do with some enhancement too!
2  All across the Great Western territory / Looking forward - 2018 to 2045 / Re: DfT - Economic impact of new and improved rail lines: case studies and method on: Yesterday at 03:01:14 pm
Wish they could spell Leamington Spa (see title of report download)
... or Bromsgrove ...
3  Journey by Journey / Cross Country services / Re: CrossCountry HST modifications. on: October 16, 2018, 12:49:34 pm
.... minimal mobile signal and no GPS behind the shielded windows.
I find this a regular experience on Cross country trains, I'm probably paranoid but I am convinced they have some way of blocking the usual wifi signals so to make people purchase their onboard wifi.

Probably nothing quite that devious..........some tinted glass has a very thin metallic film on it to reflect the heat - will also reflect 'phone signals to some extent.

Yes, this is a well-known issue with glass that's metallised (or has a film applied) to improved its thermal performance. Trains and cars can be like greenhouses, cooking those inside, and so can buildings since the current architectural fashion for glazing, glazing, and more glazing started.

It affects higher radio frequencies more than lower ones (as do other losses in building materials), so in general it's worse for higher G-numbers. Other ways of treating glass to reduce solar gain and sunburn on exposed skin are available, and while in general they don't work as well, that mainly affects buildings. When the effect was first noticed, it was seen by some businesses as an advantage because it prevented EM leakage from computers that might be intercepted outside.

When Voyagers were built, no-one was specifying that mobile phone signals ought to be allowed in. Now you might do so, though I note that the IEP spec. says nothing about the windows' electromagnetic performance other than the need for sunshades (which really address the different issue on sun getting peoples' eyes).
4  All across the Great Western territory / Across the West / Re: IETs into passenger service from 16 Oct 2017 and subsequent performance issues on: October 16, 2018, 10:40:24 am
Are the short forms a response to the ORR requiring the anti-idiot modifications?

I doubt it, designing the anti Darwin modifications and getting them approved by all the relevant agencies will take some time.

A lot of people have asked (including on this forum) "why are GWR's ones still running?". A sort-of answer would be "we've done what we can with a quick fix, and we'll do a design change for both fleets when we can". So I was expecting some kind of intervention within a couple of weeks, maybe using ties, clamps, curtains, or the like.
5  Journey by Journey / Bristol Commuters / Re: Four track for Filton Bank - ongoing discussion on: October 15, 2018, 08:05:32 pm

Of course you could just change it from an exhortation into a kind of statement, and it would remain appropriate. Now, that alters the stress when spoken, but is there a way of indicating it in writing? I think not, apart from omitting the exclamation.

Steady now, stuving! That exclamation mark, and the comma, were added to the original handle to celebrate the then Transport Minister, Justine Greening, giving the go-ahead to the project, and sending then Railway Minister Theresa Villiers to tell everybody and pose for the Post. It wasn't random, and took months of high-level meetings. I'm going to run the next amendment through the GRIP process, just in case.

You can keep the exclamation - it's not confined to exhortatory uses, which is why I added the comment like that. To clarify, you can say "it is four track now" as a plain statement, or "it is four track, now the waiting is over!" which is still a statement. It all comes down to how you see the excised phrase as a grammatical entity.
6  Journey by Journey / Bristol Commuters / Re: Four track for Filton Bank - ongoing discussion on: October 15, 2018, 07:39:06 pm
I hope Tony is polishing up his new moniker for 12 days time. The suspense and excitement over this is almost as exciting as the event itself !!! Roll Eyes

Good grief, I had forgotten that! I'm not back in the same continent for another 8 days - it's going to be tight!

Of course you could just change it from an exhortation into a kind of statement, and it would remain appropriate. Now, that alters the stress when spoken, but is there a way of indicating it in writing? I think not, apart from omitting the exclamation.
7  Journey by Journey / Shorter journeys in Devon / Re: Sinkhole at Newton Abbot - main line closed 14/10/18 on: October 14, 2018, 11:14:09 am
The "hole" is reported to be 20ft deep with more heavy rain in the area.

A bit bigger than the one I had in my back garden, then. I was trying to remember what we - and especially the Thames Water man who came to look into it* - called that. "Hole", I think.

It was at least a proper drain-related hole, caused by infiltration into a leak in a sewer. Things falling into was not the problem, so much as what was nesting down there. I wouldn't like to meet what might crawl out of the one in that picture ...

*Mandatory "joke".
8  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: Railway bridges struck by road vehicles - merged topic, ongoing discussion on: October 13, 2018, 08:23:15 pm
Reading the twitter thread, I suppose it was inevitable that someone would attempt to prove some sort of racist point by claiming that the Polish driver didn't speak any English... however, the driver may have found it confusing that the bridge clearance sign (a mandatory red circle) gave the height in US Customary units only. Isn't it rather shocking that in 2018 we still have signs in shillings and pebbles?

That certainly doesn't help, but you'd expect anyone sending a vehicle to Britain to provide the necessary conversion for the vehicle height. But that probably would not have made any difference - the vehicle was heading south towards the A55, and made it under the bridge. It was the load, presumably picked up locally, the was overheight. So who loaded it and measured its height? A wrong height entered into a Satnav that was itself working fine looks a more likely explanation.
9  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: A Mishap at London Bridge on: October 12, 2018, 09:10:26 am
And then repeat back again so that both parties understand correctly.

That's what I mean by "make sure you were understood" - control room staff in particular may need to push outside staff into doing so.
10  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: A Mishap at London Bridge on: October 12, 2018, 08:50:38 am
Does this and other incidents of this nature hignlight the unions attitude for keeping guards/second safety trained person on a train. At least in this case two heads would probably have been better than one in asking the / seeking the answer to the question of "IS THE POWER TO THE THIRD RAIL OFF ? ".

But the driver would have said "yes".

The one major thing that would have prevented this one was following communications discipline: say what you mean clearly, with proper words, and make sure you were understood.
11  Journey by Journey / London to Didcot, Oxford and Banbury / Re: Trimode cl 769 to operate Reading to Oxford and Gatwick. on: October 11, 2018, 12:49:37 pm
Acceleration, well, initial accelaration at least, looks better than I feared it might be.

Now, don't get all excited. The concern was that the output of the two engines, even before alternator and inverter losses, was well below the continuous rating of the motors. But the motors can't draw that much power at low speed; the prime power limit only cuts in once it's got going. So, for the standing start we saw there, it should do pretty well even with only one engine! (The extra weight will penalise it a little, though.)

What will be an interesting comparison will be with the Stadler bi-modes GA are getting - the 4-car ones are due to get 1920 kW of prime power, compared with less (maybe much less) than 800 in a 769.

To respond to Thatcham Crossing, those 319s are old, so use classic DC traction motors, and these ones (GEC G315BZ) are famous for their whine. I heard an engine in the first carriage (with its fan whine as prominent as the exhaust), the motors on the second, nothing on the third (but then neither pantograph nor transformer should made much noise) and expected to hear another engine in the fourth. I didn't, certainly not as loud as the first, so I'm not sure if it was not there, not running, or if the driver had throttled back by then.
12  All across the Great Western territory / Across the West / Re: IETs into passenger service from 16 Oct 2017 and subsequent performance issues on: October 10, 2018, 11:46:06 pm
If you were prepared to fit new cables, there are a few options - e.g.  lengthen the middle loops, and tie them in place, and tie the second one up to the top one. Or you could go a bit further with tying the loops to he gangway. However, if you want it to look like it was designed to look like that...

Somewhere in those cables there must be the 3 kV DC train bus, at something like 1000 A. You don't want to pull one of those so hard it comes apart ...
13  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: A Mishap at London Bridge on: October 10, 2018, 02:01:43 pm
The RAIB report into the second of these incidents - the passenger evacuation on a live line at Peckham Rye - has been published. As usual it's hard to do it justice in a short comment, but I think "Chinese whispers isn't best for managing hazardous incidents" is the key. Or how about this to wake you up: "No-one asked for an isolation of the conductor rail, or a line blockage to stop trains on adjacent lines, at any point during the incident."

This is a short list of formal non-compliances, and note that NR and ARL (the TOC for LOROL) were as bad as each other:
Quote
Examples of non-compliance with documented processes and principles include:
  • The signaller was not notified that the train was stranded before the decision had already been made by ARL strategic command to detrain the passengers (which the train driver interpreted as an instruction to evacuate the train in its current position);
  • Even after the signaller became aware of the planned evacuation no effective command of the incident was established to oversee the arrangements needed to carry out the evacuation in safety;
  • The driver was offered neither advice about the need to protect the site nor support to establish safe conditions to enable safe evacuation; and Network Rail neither communicated with ARL strategic command to confirm which organisation was leading in the management of the incident nor established an Incident Response Commander.
14  Journey by Journey / London to the Cotswolds / Re: Shipton to London on: October 10, 2018, 11:02:31 am
Shipton is a slightly curious station with its imbalance of service.  The station layout is not conducive to commuting, as there is little parking provision and if you do park you car you are faced with a walk of over a quarter of a mile to get from one platform to another along the unlit approach roads and road bridge over the railway with no footpath.  Either that or you break the law and cross the tracks!

It did, some years ago (over ten), have another morning train, which was direct to Paddington departing at just gone 6am.  That was when the first London train of the day started from Moreton-In-Marsh as a Class 180, but I think it was dropped when that train became a HST and has never returned, so since has only had the one morning train towards Oxford, but three return trains in the evening.  Quite a few Shipton passengers leave from Kingham in the morning and return to Shipton in the evening.

I can't see the service being improved - the pressure to improve journey times on through trains from Worcester to London is too strong - though at least with Turbos virtually banished from the line it is pretty easy to stop an IET with its selective door operation, so you never know.

But if you go back to 1999, the service looks remarkably like today's. Still one morning train, just 10 minutes later, and needing a change at Oxford. Still three trains back (from PAD in this case), though with one much earlier - 13:48 from PAD. And still more trains on Saturday, but none of Sunday, and the other halts got a bit more than now (all four were request calls).

Obviously as it stands the limited service is for getting to work in Oxford, or thereabouts, not London. But I wonder if it started off in part as a stockbroker-type service - would only being at work from 10-4 be OK for that?
15  All across the Great Western territory / The Wider Picture in the United Kingdom / Re: HS2 - Government proposals, alternative routes and general discussion on: October 09, 2018, 10:41:43 am
According to the GOV, " HS2 reveals design vision for new stations in Birmingham and Solihull. HS2 will release images for 2 of its brand new stations, marking a significant milestone for the programme, cementing the projectís commitment to the Midlands and emphasising the regionís place at the heart of Britainís new high speed network."

But of course pictures have been sneaking off for back-street assignations with dodgy reporters, and have been appearing in sort-of public (i.e. mostly paywalled). However, Construction Enquirer has several to look at.

For reference, Grimshaw were lead on the Birmingham Corzon Street  design, and Arup for the Solihull Interchange. My reaction is that they are inevitably big, but grandiose rather than grand, but then that is traditional for railway stations.

(I was going to post a couple, but they are huge and won't scale down nicely.)
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 220
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants