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December 18, 2017, 03:17:11 AM *
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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 11:55:38 PM 
Started by SandTEngineer - Last post by SandTEngineer
I vaguely wondered if it's Badminton
No.2 - Correct
Badminton station looking East from the down platform.  Badminton signalbox to the right.  Goods Yard to the left. The station opened with the South Wales Direct Line on 03 July 1903 and closed on 03 June 1968.  The signalbox closed on 08 May 1971 with the area becoming controlled by Bristol Panel signalbox.  Photograph taken in early 1970.  I remember having to catch a Swindon bound bus from Bristol bus station and it taking more than hour to reach Badminton station (that was actually sited in Acton Turville village).

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 11:52:09 PM 
Started by grahame - Last post by didcotdean
I worked in a building with a paternoster in the 80s. It had just been upgraded with trip boards as someone had an accident involving their feet being positioned over the open part of the compartment. As well as the lack of parts they have been replaced by conventional lifts as they cannot be used by people in wheelchairs or even a bit unsteady on their feet.

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 10:23:18 PM 
Started by grahame - Last post by grahame
We had one of those 'Our Father' machines in the Arts Tower at Sheffield University.  Don't know whether it's still there.  Great fun...and probably not allowed to be installed these days with more stringent H&S rules.  No issues with doors to open of course.  Roll Eyes

Rumour has it that it might be ...

Quote
What is a Paternoster lift?
- Invented in the 1860s by Peter Ellis, an architect from Liverpool.
- Uses open compartments on a continuously moving loop, one side going up, the other down.
- Name comes from system's resemblance to rosary prayer beads and Latin for ''Our Father', which begins the Lord's Prayer.
- Other surviving UK examples are in the University of Sheffield Arts Tower and University of Essex Albert Sloman library.



 4 
 on: Yesterday at 10:10:01 PM 
Started by grahame - Last post by trainer
We had one of those 'Our Father' machines in the Arts Tower at Sheffield University.  Don't know whether it's still there.  Great fun...and probably not allowed to be installed these days with more stringent H&S rules.  No issues with doors to open of course.  Roll Eyes

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 10:06:08 PM 
Started by RailCornwall - Last post by Chris from Nailsea
The 57s, once based at Long Rock, can be renamed after Cornish heroes:
57601 Myghal Josep An Gof
57602 Bishop Jonathan Trelawny
57603 Richard Trevithick
57604 Jethro

What no Ross Poldark !😠😎

More to the point - why no Sir Bevil Grenville?   Shocked


 6 
 on: Yesterday at 10:05:48 PM 
Started by grahame - Last post by Kempis
A rare Paternoster lift - which has no doors and moves continually without stopping at floor level - is to be removed by a university.

Installed in the Attenborough Tower of the University of Leicester in the late 1960s, the lift was one of the last in the UK.

While acknowledging the device will be missed, officials said it had become too expensive to maintain.  A replacement standard lift is due to be installed by September 2018.

A petition to save the lift, which has attracted more than 2,000 signatures, described it as a "fundamental part" of Attenborough Tower, and a "piece of engineering history".

The University confirmed the news "with a heavy heart".  In a statement it said: "We have done our best to maintain and update the lift, but unfortunately it has reached the end of its working life. We've looked at a range of options and thought carefully about this, but it would be both impractical and uneconomic to attempt to fix it or replace it. Spare parts for Paternosters are no longer available and need to be manufactured each time they are needed."

Before it closed Professor Gordon Campbell, from the University, said: "There are loads of safety features, there is a cord to pull, a button to press and you can also bang on the sides. Although it looks deeply dangerous, it isn't - and of course it moves at a very sedate pace."

That's sad. I remember using the Paternoster when going to Leicester for an interview. It's an efficient and elegant piece of engineering. (By coincidence, Gordon Campbell was on the interviewing panel.)

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 09:24:16 PM 
Started by Timmer - Last post by Steve Bray
This week in the new timetable, many surburban trains have been extended from 8 to 10 cars. On Monday evening, the train I was on pulled into Raynes Park station. Very quickly the guard opened the doors; however, at the same time, the driver realised he/she'd stopped short, and moved the train forward, presumably unaware that the doors had been opened. Passengers were of course getting off the train and one stumbled and fell onto the platform but soon got up. However, this could have been far worse.

How did you manage to get a train on Monday? I got to Waterloo at about 6pm and everything was listed as delayed or cancelled. I headed off to Victoria instead to find the next few services calling at Epsom had been cancelled. At least I got a seat in Wetherspoons while I was waiting.


I actually had a function after work, so returned from London at around 9pm, just when services started operating (I won't say "were getting back to normal", because they weren't); however this incident was another hiccup which created a further short delay




Edit note: Quote marks fixed, for clarity. CfN.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 08:59:06 PM 
Started by RailCornwall - Last post by Four Track, Now!
With any luck, nobody will notice that you made a muck-up.  Wink Cheesy Grin

I didn't notice, at least not until I read this...

How very appropriate - Castles were built at a time of uncertainty with the expectation of an intense but limited life. They have turned out to have lasted very much longer and have a heavy use today, all be it in a very different way to what they were designed for in the first place.

Which castle names should be selected?

Mrs FT, N! is fond of Coch.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 08:39:07 PM 
Started by grahame - Last post by grahame
18:39 from Westbury and 19:53 from Swindon cancelled this evening, train fault allegedly

And I would suspect that there really was a problem with the train ... though not always one to believe everything I read even on JourneyCheck. 

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 08:37:06 PM 
Started by grahame - Last post by Chris from Nailsea
From the BBC:

Quote
University closes rare lift 'with a heavy heart'

A rare Paternoster lift - which has no doors and moves continually without stopping at floor level - is to be removed by a university.

Installed in the Attenborough Tower of the University of Leicester in the late 1960s, the lift was one of the last in the UK.

While acknowledging the device will be missed, officials said it had become too expensive to maintain.  A replacement standard lift is due to be installed by September 2018.

A petition to save the lift, which has attracted more than 2,000 signatures, described it as a "fundamental part" of Attenborough Tower, and a "piece of engineering history".

The University confirmed the news "with a heavy heart".  In a statement it said: "We have done our best to maintain and update the lift, but unfortunately it has reached the end of its working life. We've looked at a range of options and thought carefully about this, but it would be both impractical and uneconomic to attempt to fix it or replace it. Spare parts for Paternosters are no longer available and need to be manufactured each time they are needed."

Before it closed Professor Gordon Campbell, from the University, said: "There are loads of safety features, there is a cord to pull, a button to press and you can also bang on the sides. Although it looks deeply dangerous, it isn't - and of course it moves at a very sedate pace."


Quote
What is a Paternoster lift?
- Invented in the 1860s by Peter Ellis, an architect from Liverpool.
- Uses open compartments on a continuously moving loop, one side going up, the other down.
- Name comes from system's resemblance to rosary prayer beads and Latin for ''Our Father', which begins the Lord's Prayer.
- Other surviving UK examples are in the University of Sheffield Arts Tower and University of Essex Albert Sloman library.


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