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Author Topic: Bristol Temple Meads Station redevelopment  (Read 164877 times)
grahame
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« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2012, 08:25:13 pm »

It must be borne in mind that the station must be by the railway   !!!

There are exceptions:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_railway_station

But I would agree in the case of Bristol!
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« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2012, 08:52:43 pm »

There is already a station close to Dr Days Junction - Lawrence Hill. I agree that no more is needed than already announced.

The plans for the subway at Temple Meads seem to suggest that a great deal of digging will be needed, at a cost of many many pounds. Also, we will have many months of disruption, all of which will be worthwhile when it is finished. I like the idea for the new entrance, and also for the access from the other side, where the rat catchers live currently.

I hope the access problems at other stations are also addressed. On the way back from Shire last week, we stopped at Stapleton Road, to pick up an elderly lady on her way to Lawrence Hill. She had got off a train that didn't stop there. I had to get out to give her a bunk-up, and again at Lawrence Hill to help her off. The step down to the platform at both is enormous, with a sizeable gap - I hadn't realised how bad it is. The lady asked the conductor how she could complain. She was told that the staff have been complaining about it for years. She was beginning her ascent of the stairs as the train pulled out, and might still be there now.
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2012, 01:13:09 am »

From the Bristol Post:

Quote
^100 million promised for Temple Meads revamp

A Government minister has announced that ^100 million is to be spent on bringing Bristol's Temple Meads station into the modern age ^ with more cash on the way.

The money will be divided between upgrading the station and opening up two unused platforms for the new electrified trains which will operate between Bristol and London.


Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin at Temple Meads station

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin came to Bristol for the cabinet meeting and met bosses from First Great Western and Network Rail at the station.

As well as revealing that ^100 million will be spent on Brunel's Victorian masterpiece the minister added that he is looking forward to working with the city's first elected mayor.

During the visit it emerged that Network Rail, which operates the station, has put ^100 million to one side to pay for a major revamp of the historic building. And more money is also expected to be spent on creating a new entrance at the side of the building and turning the current approach into a public square.

Mr McLoughlin said: "This is a fantastic facility and a fantastic station and there has been a big increase in demand for rail travel in recent years. It is fantastic that such a great city as Bristol is going to get a great service to match its aspirations."
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« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2012, 12:05:48 am »

From the Bristol Post:

Quote
^100 million promised for Temple Meads revamp

A Government minister has announced that ^100 million is to be spent on bringing Bristol's Temple Meads station into the modern age ^ with more cash on the way.

The money will be divided between upgrading the station and opening up two unused platforms for the new electrified trains which will operate between Bristol and London.


Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin at Temple Meads station

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin came to Bristol for the cabinet meeting and met bosses from First Great Western and Network Rail at the station.

As well as revealing that ^100 million will be spent on Brunel's Victorian masterpiece the minister added that he is looking forward to working with the city's first elected mayor.

During the visit it emerged that Network Rail, which operates the station, has put ^100 million to one side to pay for a major revamp of the historic building. And more money is also expected to be spent on creating a new entrance at the side of the building and turning the current approach into a public square.

Mr McLoughlin said: "This is a fantastic facility and a fantastic station and there has been a big increase in demand for rail travel in recent years. It is fantastic that such a great city as Bristol is going to get a great service to match its aspirations."

Fantastic.
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2013, 01:19:44 am »

From the Bristol Post:

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Giant plant appears at Temple Mead station

Passengers arriving at Temple Meads Station were greeted by what appeared to be a bizarre sight - a giant plant growing out of the ground.

The inflatable was part of an art project designed to attract people and businesses to the new Enterprise Zone around the station.


Giant plant appears at Temple Meads

Two new artworks by Bristol based Filthy Luker and Inky were unveiled yesterday as part of the new campaign.

The installations are part of the BTQ Commissions project and aim to provide a better welcome to the city at Temple Meads and raise awareness over the new Enterprise Zone.

A competition was also launched at the station by Bristol Festival of Ideas director Andrew Kelly to help visitors learn about the area and guide them on their way.

Proposals include short films, posters, cartoons, short stories, street art or drama performances. The Creative Gateway competition will give ten awards of ^500 for project proposals to be developed.
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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

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« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2013, 01:32:09 am »

Just right for scaring the little ones in the next door nursery.  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2013, 08:58:16 am »

The nursery staff could always use it as a lifesize prop for'Jack and the beanstalk' ..or is that not allowed on pc racist.sexist grounds these days ( 'Englishman') or even vegetarian cruelty ? ('Chop!) Grin
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2013, 11:45:05 pm »

From The Post (Bristol):

Quote
Bristol City Council has bought an office block near Temple Meads railway station for ^18 million as part of a massive overhaul of council offices.

But what should it be called?


100 Temple Street

The former London Life headquarters are uninspiringly known as 100 Temple Street. But the office block is capable of eventually housing 2,000 staff who are currently based in a varied collection of 35 buildings throughout the city. The long-term aim is to bring all the admin staff together mostly into 100 Temple Street and City Hall in College Green which will undergo a refurbishment of nearly ^8 million.

We are asking readers to suggest a new name for the office block which befits its new high-profile role.

Bristol mayor George Ferguson said: ^It makes complete sense for the council to vastly reduce the number of offices it currently owns or leases across the city and consolidate into a few core offices. The location of 100 Temple Street is very strategic next to Temple meads and the planned Metrobus interchange, as well as being right at the heart of our ambitious plans for Redcliffe and the whole Enterprise Zone area.^

He said they looked at various other offices in the city which the council could have bought - some of which could have been cheaper - but this office block trumped the others, mostly due to its location near Temple Meads. In the years to come, Mr Ferguson sees council staff travelling to work on the metro system to Temple Meads and walking a few hundred yards to their office.

The council could also not have bought a better time due to the recession which has seen the bottom fall out of the commercial property market. It is understood that the purchase price was less than half what the owners, Aviva Investors Property Trust, paid for the office block at the height of the boom in 2005.

The purchase also rules out converting an empty bonded warehouse in the Cumberland Basin which was suggested last year. Mr Ferguson said: ^We looked carefully at A Bond but it was not right for this move. It would have been more expensive, would have provided less functional workspace and was in an inappropriate location. However, there remains a great opportunity for A Bond to be developed in partnership as a residential or mixed use development as part of a wider regeneration of Cumberland Basin.^

The refurb of City Hall will take about six to nine months and although all the staff will be moved out during the process, it will still be used for council meetings and events. Although it is a Grade II* listed building, City Hall is woefully inadequate as council offices in the 21st century. The makeover will see the removal of partitioning to create open space offices, new cabling to accommodate upgraded software, a new customer service point to replace Phoenix Court in New Bond Street and even a cafe and meeting rooms for clubs and groups.

^I really want to see City Hall used in the same way as in many European cities so it becomes a market place for people to meet,^ Mr Ferguson said. The overhaul of council offices will cost a whopping ^70 million in outlay - but council officers have conservatively estimated that savings on running costs will give a net ^profit^ during the next 25 years of ^40 million.

Mr Ferguson said Bristol was playing ^catch up^ with other councils such as Birmingham, Wiltshire and Swindon which had already started the process of rationalising its office space. He said: ^This is not about providing comfort or luxury for council staff - it^s about running services as efficiently as we possibly can in good working conditions.^

The council currently uses 53,000 sq metres of office space in the city which will be reduced to 32,000 sq metres although Mr Ferguson is asking for even more savings.

Council staff are expected to move into 100 Temple Street from the beginning of next year which will open the way for City Hall to be refurbished. It will also mean that some council buildings will be available for other possible uses - including new primary schools.

The office shake up which has been worked on by a team of officers for the past few years due to its complexity, is being paid for with prudential borrowing - low-cost loans from the Government which are only available to local authorities.

The purchase of 100 Temple Street has already been welcomed by business leaders and property experts in the city.

Ned Cussen, on behalf of the Bristol Property Agents Association, said: ^This is good news for all of Bristol and I commend the initiative from the council. It will enable the council to deliver more efficient services in a first class building. It is also a great location for both staff and visitors. 100 Temple Street is a quality building and the deal represents good value for money. Whichever way you look at it, this a major property deal for Bristol and gives a great lift to the local economy.

"More so, it uses vacant space and gives a great boost to the Enterprise Zone at Temple Meads. The zone will be one of the major focuses for economic activity in the Greater Bristol area in the next decade. This deal makes far more sense than trying to convert the red brick Tobacco Bond at Cumberland Basin to offices.^

Colin Skellett, chairman of Wessex Water and the Local Enterprise Partnership, said: ^This is great news for Bristol and makes eminent strategic sense in terms of its location alongside the Enterprise Zone with its great regional transport links. It is encouraging to see the mayor driving these efficiency measures through in the intests of more effective and economic governance.^

Phil Smith, MD of Business West, said: ^We applaud George for taking decisive action to implement more efficient and effective ways of accommodating council staff. Whilst this may seem obvious and a rleatively minor decision, it will actually provide some important benefits. More staff housed in fewer offices and less space will save the council money at a time when budgets are particularly tight - a saving of around ^40 million over 25 years is a significant amount that can now be used to help create jobs and improve the environment of the city.

^The idea of relocating council staff close to Temple Meads and the Enterprise Zone shows the mayor^s commitment to further regenerating this area and creating a focus for activity and enterprise, hopefully this will encourage others to do the same.^
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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

"Level crossings are safe, unless they are used in an unsafe manner."  Discuss.
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« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2013, 11:34:49 am »

Good news for those of us on here wanting the nearby Plot 6 opposite, next to Brunel's station (or was it  plot 7?) to be the transport hub of Bristol.  I don't actually see what's wrong with its present name.  I attended a meeting there once, and yes, it was quite swish.

Actually the site was originally covered by part of Mardon, Sons and Hall which was the firm that made the fag packets for Wills / Imperial Tobacco (later absorbed by them).  I am afraid the Luftwaffe 'knocked it about a bit'. 
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« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2013, 02:43:42 pm »

I am afraid the Luftwaffe 'knocked it about a bit'. 


The West of England Partnership has taken up where the Luftwaffe left off.
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« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2013, 10:44:13 pm »

Went through Temple Meads today.

On the way in I was reminded that an extra couple of metres on the South side of P15 would make a P16 possible in the future.

Then I looked at the space and tracks between P3/5 and thought wouldn't it be much more satisfactory to use that space - under the roof - for passengers and have the through roads on the south side.

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« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2013, 12:51:44 am »

Went through Temple Meads today.

On the way in I was reminded that an extra couple of metres on the South side of P15 would make a P16 possible in the future.

Then I looked at the space and tracks between P3/5 and thought wouldn't it be much more satisfactory to use that space - under the roof - for passengers and have the through roads on the south side.


A good idea, but I have a feeling it would entail nearly as much work as at Reading, and Bristol is too far down a very long list for investment like that.
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« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2013, 01:36:46 am »

Having up freight traffic cross the throat to access the Up Filton would seriously limit capacity as well.
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« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2013, 09:09:04 am »

...Bristol is too far down a very long list for investment like that.

After the excitement of St Pancras and Kings Cross, it's been disappointing to see how provincial stations are lucky to pick up a few crumbs of investment. The plans for Worcester Foregate St seem parsimonious, and even Reading lacks the grand entrance it probably deserves.

Nonetheless (and maybe I'm being naive) I have high hopes for the future of Temple Meads; its Grade I listed status should hopefully allow additional sources of funding to be tapped into. I accept that it is not going to get a Reading-style track expansion (is it a bottleneck?), but I think it is reasonable to expect that they do a decent job on the building.

A casual visitor may not appreciate that nearly half of the 1870s extension to Brunel's station was demolished when the signal box was built in the 1960s. I have seen rather sketchy plans suggesting that this roof will be rebuilt in some form when the old platforms are brought back into use; surely this needs to be a high-quality restoration to more or less exactly how it was before?

If you will indulge this flight of fancy a little further, it strikes me that it would be fantastic to have a glass wall between the Brunel part of the Old Station (the bit where they hold the Beer Festival) and the extension. This would allow passengers could see the old hammerbeam roof from the new platforms, and conference-goers could see out into the station.

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« Reply #29 on: April 27, 2013, 09:31:18 am »

Having up freight traffic cross the throat to access the Up Filton would seriously limit capacity as well.

I suppose the best (and expensive) solution to that would be a flyover from St Phillips Marsh to the Filton lines, but there would have to be a lot of freight to justify that. 

On another matter is the construction of the showcase cinema over the site of the old East to South Curve to St Phillips Marsh the most stupid example of the short sighted sale of railway land in our region?
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