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Author Topic: Bristol's Temple Gate layout change planned in £21m revamp  (Read 19092 times)
stuving
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« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2018, 07:07:04 pm »

Here's a bit more explaining from another BCC offshoot, the Temple Quarter. Note that it dates from two years ago, so the Broughton House energy center has been running since before that. Part of this says:
Quote
How do energy centres work?
Energy centres work in much the same way a building’s plant room operates – but consolidate the heating (and occasionally power) needs of neighbouring buildings. This approach has several benefits, including:
  • Reducing the space required for HVAC (heating and cooling) plant within the buildings themselves, including boilers and associated infrastructure;
  • More efficient generation of heat and power, due to larger and more constant demands. Not only does this result in cheaper sources of energy for connected buildings, but it can improve local air quality (compared to individual heating systems).
  • Larger energy requirements allow a greater choice of technologies – whilst gas boilers are suitable in single homes, some larger and renewable sources of heat and power need larger steadier demands to run efficiently.
The energy centres themselves can be installed in existing buildings, such as the 1MW wood pellet boiler installed in Broughton House just outside the Enterprise Zone. They could also be installed in new bespoke buildings, as is often done in major new developments; or the final option is temporary energy centres, for instance having a portable boiler or combined heat and power (CHP) plant within a refurbished shipping container (similar to those close to Engine Shed by Bristol Temple Meads).

So what Broughton House has is an oversized boiler burning wood pellets - not CHP as all, and as for "low carbon"....
« Last Edit: July 19, 2018, 07:24:49 pm by stuving » Logged
Red Squirrel
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« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2018, 07:44:34 pm »

...another BCC offshoot, the Temple Quarter.

Not really a BCC offshoot; it's an Enterprize Zone - I think you could describe it as more-or-less a Quango.

And Broughton House, I think, you could more-or-less describe as a block of flats.
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bignosemac
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« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2018, 12:47:43 am »

I think you could describe it as more-or-less a Quango.

A fizzy orange drink?  Tongue
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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2018, 08:53:19 am »

I think you could describe it as more-or-less a Quango.

A fizzy orange drink?  Tongue

Near enough. https://youtu.be/CroeBR_xMQY
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Western Pathfinder
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« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2018, 12:50:15 pm »

And Now This .
http://news.bristol.gov.uk/work_to_transform_bristol_s_temple_meads_station_gets.
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SandTEngineer
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« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2018, 01:19:16 pm »

When I first read it I thought they were suggesting demolishing the existing station.....then...phew... Roll Eyes Tongue
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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2018, 10:48:20 pm »

Apparently Marv's plan is to relocate Bristol's main railway station to a new location near Stoke Gifford...
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eXPassenger
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« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2018, 10:22:37 am »

Apparently Marv's plan is to relocate Bristol's main railway station to a new location near Stoke Gifford...

He could then use the space freed up for an arena.
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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2018, 10:47:19 am »

Apparently Marv's plan is to relocate Bristol's main railway station to a new location near Stoke Gifford...

He could then use the space freed up for an arena.

...before retiring to his dacha near Thornbury.
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martyjon
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« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2018, 11:14:36 am »

Apparently Marv's plan is to relocate Bristol's main railway station to a new location near Stoke Gifford...
He could then use the space freed up for an arena.

Marv has closed all the cities public loos coz the council cant afford the million or so needed to keep them open, where is he going to get the billions to buy the vacated land from Network Rail / BR Residuary Board, a loan from the Chinese to which he seems to be very fond of cosying up to ? Perhaps he wants the Temple Meads location to be Bristol's main underground railway interchange point instead.

Since he has been mayor I have noticed a marked deterioration in the cleanliness of the cities streets with some streets and footpaths not yet relieved of last autumns leaf drop.

Just take a peep at the masses of vegetation growing up from the concrete constructions on the M32 into the city, hardly a good advertisement for the city or should it be the city for not pestering Highways England to get it removed.

Being born a Bristolian I am increasingly becoming ashamed of the city I have lived in or near for all my life with the elected politicians seemingly doing nowt to improve it yet all too willing to holding their hands out for their councillors allowances and all the other perks available to them. I have heard comments in City Hall. "Is there a lunchtime buffet for your meeting". "No". "I wont be staying on then".

One of the worst things Westminster did was when they allowed councillors to be paid an attendance allowance for attending meetings, when I was a councillor we didn't get anything as a right although we could apply for reasonable out of pocket expenses which had to go to a committee consisting of political party leaders, council chairperson, staff member of treasury department but in them days we stood at elections for the privilege of serving the people of the community in which you lived.
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2018, 11:42:57 am »

Quote
It already receives around 10 million passengers a year and this is expected to rise to more than 22 million by 2030,
Blimey!
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« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2018, 03:37:57 pm »

IIRC, the land to the north of the station is owned by the Homes & Communities Agency, the land next to Bristol & Exeter House is owned by Skanska (unless they have sold it to the Council), and most of the island in the middle of the gyratory system is owned by the Council, although the old hotel is not.

The old Royal Mail site is currently owned by the Council too - I think the deal is that the Council demolish the Royal Mail building and thus absolve the University of any liability.

The plans for the replacement of the gyratory system proposed that the current station approach would end up pedestrianised, with an Engine Shed II complex where the old hotel is now.

Apart from that it's probably safe to say that subject to someone agreeing to pay for it:

1) There will be a new station building/shopping centre/car park on the HCA land to the north of the station with as large an office block on top of it as they can get away with.
2) There will be an eastern entrance into Temple Meads (although I don't think there was anything in the University's master plan)
3) The old trainshed platforms will be reinstated (albeit after the signal box is removed and foot traffic re-routed)

The 11,000 new homes are presumably going on the land around Avon Street on the east side of the river, which presumably will be a nice little earner for the Council if it owns any of the land.   

 
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TonyK
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« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2018, 10:35:30 am »

I think you could describe it as more-or-less a Quango.

A fizzy orange drink?  Tongue

It takes two to Quango.

Marv has closed all the cities public loos coz the council cant afford the million or so needed to keep them open, where is he going to get the billions to buy the vacated land from Network Rail / BR Residuary Board, a loan from the Chinese to which he seems to be very fond of cosying up to ?

How dare you make such an inflammatory comment!!! They're Malaysian. Smiley

The 11,000 new homes are presumably going on the land around Avon Street on the east side of the river, which presumably will be a nice little earner for the Council if it owns any of the land.   

It will still be a decent earner even if the council doesn't own it. The Community Infrastructure Levy for inner Bristol is £70 per square metre. That's around £5000 for a modest dwelling, or £55 million for 11,000 modest dwellings. Then there's all that lovely council tax.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2018, 10:41:00 am by Four Track, Now! » Logged

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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #28 on: July 24, 2018, 12:33:45 pm »

It will still be a decent earner even if the council doesn't own it. The Community Infrastructure Levy for inner Bristol is £70 per square metre. That's around £5000 for a modest dwelling, or £55 million for 11,000 modest dwellings. Then there's all that lovely council tax.

Interesting, isn't it - in the fifties and sixties, councils were keen to knock down houses to build light industrial units and roads; any prestigious city was proud of how their really big road systems connected the widget factories to low-density worker hutches in the suburbs. Now they've realised that by replacing those roads and now-derelict sheds with high-density houses, they can raise more revenue and make highly-desirable and liveable places; places that are, in many ways, similar to what was there before... If only someone could think of a way to allow people to move in and out of these areas without needing a car, the job would be a good 'un...

https://youtu.be/zyeMFSzPgGc

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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #29 on: July 24, 2018, 01:48:18 pm »

If the figure of 11,000 new dwellings is correct, that's the quota Marvin promised us and a bit extra in one go.
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