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Author Topic: Fill in 3rd rail?  (Read 19509 times)
Noggin
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« Reply #75 on: December 11, 2016, 11:12:59 PM »


With a more modern unit, there will be software to re-write, which may well end up costing more money and taking longer than figuring out how to do the engine and where the fuel tank goes.

I think that the 319's are computer controlled via a thyristor not camshaft/PCM controller.

As it might have a 286 PC running IBM DOS 3.3 it is probably quite reliable!

Imagine a crowded 12 car set running under Windows 8, stuck somewhere critical, with the guard and driver walking down the train asking "anyone know how to....?"

OTC

I imagine you are right, I suppose what I meant was that they are still relatively simple compared with modern units where you have extensive computer management of the traction system e.g. power flows, braking, traction control etc.
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grahame
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« Reply #76 on: December 22, 2016, 06:58:45 PM »

From Porterbrook's news (here)

Quote
Porterbrook and Northern to introduce bi-mode Class 319 Flex trains

Working with the Rail North Partnership, to support a growing railway in the north, Porterbrook and train operator Northern, part of the Arriva Group, are jointly developing a highly innovative rolling stock concept.

Porterbrook Leasing is pleased to announce that it has committed to deliver to Northern, a variant of a Class 319 electric train which is able to operate seamlessly over electrified and non-electrified routes, spreading the benefits of electrification to more rail users. The project is supported by Rail North, representing local authorities in the north of England.

The Class 319 Flex concept is designed to create a bi-mode train by fitting two diesel powered alternators, one under each of the driving trailer cars. The diesel alternators provide power to the existing traction and auxiliary equipment to allow the EMU to operate without an overhead or 3rd rail supply. The systems will provide power through the trainís DC bus, avoiding any significant changes to the existing equipment and creating a unit capable of operating from a number of different power sources whilst maintaining its full capabilities on electrified routes.

[snip]


The first units will be in passenger service with train operator Arriva Northern by spring 2018 and from then on will be available to a wide range of operators who will be able to make full use of electrically powered rolling stock on partially electrified routes.

There are around 86 4 car units in class 319
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IndustryInsider
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« Reply #77 on: December 22, 2016, 08:58:04 PM »

Interesting idea.  Let's hope it doesn't become fraught with reliability and teething troubles which can often happen when something new is added to something old.
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stuving
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« Reply #78 on: December 22, 2016, 08:58:22 PM »

The Class 319 Flex concept is designed to create a bi-mode train by fitting two diesel powered alternators, one under each of the driving trailer cars. The diesel alternators provide power to the existing traction and auxiliary equipment to allow the EMU to operate without an overhead or 3rd rail supply.

I wonder ...

Current reckoning is that engines that meet NRMM IIIB with enough power for a DMU are too big to go under the floor. The D-train gets round that (and a low floor) by using smaller engines in pairs. They are talking about two pairs (800 HP, or 600 kW, total) per train.

The 319 is heavier and will need over 1 MW prime power to match the existing performance. That's nearly twice a D-train's power, and looks hard to do on only two cars. So have the engine makers managed to reduce the profile of the bigger IIIB versions? Or will it be pretty slow?
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Surrey 455
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« Reply #79 on: December 22, 2016, 09:48:24 PM »

NRMM IIIB

Eh?
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stuving
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« Reply #80 on: December 22, 2016, 10:16:21 PM »


Does that imply that there are readers of this forum who are not intimately familiar with European Directive 97/68/EC, implemented into UK law by the "Non-Road Mobile Machinery (Emission of Gaseous and Particulate Pollutants) Regulations 1999" (Statutory Instrument No. 1999/1053)? [The Regulations apply to new engines to be installed in non-road mobile machinery, intended and suited to move, or to be moved on the ground, either on or off the road.]

Surely not.
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grahame
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« Reply #81 on: December 23, 2016, 07:02:51 AM »

Or will it be pretty slow?

But that's a question asked only for the diesel sections of the route, right?  I'm aware that I'm posting in the North Downs line section here, and I don't know the gradient profile ... but let's say on "the Bedwyns" ... would a slow movement away at Hungerford, Kintbury and (return journey only) Bedwyn be a small price to pay especially when balanced against the greater acceleration under electric power all the rest of the way to Paddington?
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