Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum Great Western Coffee Shop - [home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here]. Register and contribute [here] - it's free.
Random Image
Train Running @GWR Twitter Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail News GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4 Chat on off
July 22, 2017, 09:47:57 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: See how they used to be ...1983 to 1984  (Read 2274 times)
Bmblbzzz
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 839


View Profile Email
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2017, 10:16:07 AM »

Curious how the 1965 timetable has several halts between Westbury and Newbury that were closed by 1983 but not beyond Newbury. Or was it just that they didn't list those on that timetable?
Logged

Day return to Infinity, please.
Noggin
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 207


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2017, 10:27:18 AM »

Thank you all. Very interesting. Just shows to show how much more intensive the modern railway is and that things were not always better under BR, or even the pre-nationalised railways for that matter.

With the trains from Bedwyn, yes, the sorts of fairly wealthy people who were using them worked fairly short hours and came home relatively early (presumably staying in their clubs and private houses if they were dining in London). Certainly in the case of the Manchester club trains, they were usually timed to get in about 10am and leave about 5pm. I believe that included a director of the GWR, but that might be an urban myth.

The Wednesday, Saturday and Thursday services in the GWR are likely accounted for by half-day closing and market days.

There would likely have been a significant traffic of school children, including to and from boarding schools such as Marlborough. My father-in-law lived in Devizes and took the train to secondary school in Bath every day, which if I read the timetable rightly, meant that he spent 95 minutes each way on the train, getting home after 7pm.

And of course it goes without saying that if the infrastructure had just been left in-situ with minimal maintenance from the 1960s to the 1980s, there's a reasonable chance that many of the closed stations would now have significant levels of traffic, justifying far higher service levels than the ever did before.
Logged
Witham Bobby
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2017, 01:11:13 PM »

I wonder why Bedwyn was chosen as a terminus even back in the 1960s for some services from Reading.  [SNIP]  I wonder if it was chosen simply for operational convenience.

With the boundary between the BR(WR) London Division and the West of England Division near Lavington, I think Bedwyn was chosen as the last station in the London Division.  Beyond that, into the territory of the Bristol folks running the West of England Division, there was a far grater zeal to shut stations and reduce any remaining services to as little as could be got away with.  London Division tended to keep stations open and stopping services remained a thing on their rails.  But cross that divisional boundary, and different rules applied.
Logged
ZoŽ
TransWilts Member
Hero Member
******
Posts: 658


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2017, 05:32:26 PM »

With the boundary between the BR(WR) London Division and the West of England Division near Lavington, I think Bedwyn was chosen as the last station in the London Division.  Beyond that, into the territory of the Bristol folks running the West of England Division, there was a far grater zeal to shut stations and reduce any remaining services to as little as could be got away with.  London Division tended to keep stations open and stopping services remained a thing on their rails.  But cross that divisional boundary, and different rules applied.
Back in the GWR/early WR days the boundary was indeed at Bedwyn which was indeed the last station in the London division with everything west of there up to and including Castle Cary in the old Bristol division.  That said though, I can't see the case for keeping Bedwyn open would have been that great compared to Hungerford and east.   I'm not quite sure when it was moved to Lavington but if it was still at Bedwyn then given what you said above, it's suprising that Pewsey survived.

Actually had there not been a need to serve Pewsey, I wonder if closure of the line west of Bedwyn would have been considered with West of England services instead routed via a double track Weymouth Line from Thingley Junction to Westbury.  This would have been longer than the direct route but would have still been shorter than going via Bristol and any significant time penalty could have been reduced by line speed improvements.  Had this been done then maybe we'd now have a regular direct service from Trowbridge and Melksham to London.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2017, 07:43:13 PM by ZoŽ » Logged
SandTEngineer
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1402


Somewhere in the far Southwest


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2017, 07:33:43 PM »

I can't lay my hands on the references I'm thinking of at the moment, but I believe the long term plan was to single (again) most of the B&H west of Newbury and including eventually, all the way to Taunton.  I don't think total closure was ever on the books (now prove me wrong  Roll Eyes).
Logged

Out of this nettle, Danger, we pluck this flower, Safety.
[Henry IV, Part 1, Act 2, Scene 3]
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 17166



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2017, 10:49:59 PM »

I can't lay my hands on the references I'm thinking of at the moment, but I believe the long term plan was to single (again) most of the B&H west of Newbury and including eventually, all the way to Taunton.  I don't think total closure was ever on the books (now prove me wrong  Roll Eyes).

Serpell option A closed the whole B&H ... option B turned Westbury into a branch from Reading:
http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/documents/DoT_Serpell001.pdf
The whole route survived in C3 which was the next most draconian.
Logged

TransWilts Rail - Linking North to West and South 9 times a day. [see here]
SandTEngineer
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1402


Somewhere in the far Southwest


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2017, 09:10:47 AM »

Thanks Grahame, couldn't remember where I had seen it (and you proved me wrong in the process Tongue).
Logged

Out of this nettle, Danger, we pluck this flower, Safety.
[Henry IV, Part 1, Act 2, Scene 3]
John R
TransWilts Member
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4203


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2017, 09:18:03 PM »

Indeed, although the Serpell Report was rejected the BR 5 Yr Plan published in the autumn 83 proposed significant reductions in track miles, including partial singling between Newbury and Cogload, with 42 miles affected.  Many of these reductions took place, e.g. Dr Days Jn to Filton Jn dequadrification, and some were done and long been reversed (eg Burngullow to Probus).  Thankfully many didn't, such as the then remaining double track section on the North Cotswold Line.

It also proposed some passenger closures, most famously the Settle to Carlisle line, and the complete closure of Marylebone. Of interest to some members, it also proposed the closure of some routes with no intermediate stations, including the 8.5 miles between Thingley Jn and Bradford Jn.
Logged
hoover50
Full Member
***
Posts: 30


Class 50 at Swindon


View Profile Email
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2017, 01:24:33 PM »

I can't lay my hands on the references I'm thinking of at the moment, but I believe the long term plan was to single (again) most of the B&H west of Newbury and including eventually, all the way to Taunton.  I don't think total closure was ever on the books (now prove me wrong  Roll Eyes).

Serpell option A closed the whole B&H ... option B turned Westbury into a branch from Reading:
http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/documents/DoT_Serpell001.pdf
The whole route survived in C3 which was the next most draconian.

A few years ago someone "in the know" told me that one of the main reasons the decision was made to keep the B&H open was because of the stone traffic.
Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants