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Author Topic: Cornwall floods leave motorists trapped in vehicles - 3 Sep 2017  (Read 1352 times)
ChrisB
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« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2017, 08:32:12 PM »

If you then got stuck too, yes
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ellendune
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« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2017, 10:28:37 PM »

I have a vehicle which is more than capable of safely getting through a metre of water with a very minor modification, do I deserve to have my bank account drained?!

But you cannot see what is under the water.

1) Can you see the edge of the road - you could end up in a ditch
2) The current can be very strong deep water moving at only slow speeds can exert a huge force and wash a vehicle away.
3) Manhole covers may have blown and be invisible - will you be sure that a wheel will not get stuck in an open manhole cover?
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chrisr_75
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« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2017, 10:44:57 PM »

I have a vehicle which is more than capable of safely getting through a metre of water with a very minor modification, do I deserve to have my bank account drained?!

But you cannot see what is under the water.

1) Can you see the edge of the road - you could end up in a ditch
2) The current can be very strong deep water moving at only slow speeds can exert a huge force and wash a vehicle away.
3) Manhole covers may have blown and be invisible - will you be sure that a wheel will not get stuck in an open manhole cover?

I am well aware of the dangers of driving into deep water. The previous poster suggested that I should have my bank account drained simply because I think, and know, I could drive through standing water of a metre or so depth which I find a very odd concept indeed!

I've driven through deep water, deep mud, deep snow uneventfully without inconveniencing anyone else. Why should I be financially deprived for that?! On a few occasions I've dragged other unfortunate folk from floods and managed not to get all judgemental/condescending on them. Yes, it's pretty stupid getting stuck and technically breaking the law, but at the end of the day we all make mistakes from time to time.
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2017, 10:53:44 PM »

On two occasions in the past, I have driven my Mercedes Sprinter van through standing floodwater, because I knew that it would not be more than two feet deep, on those particular stretches of road.

Any deeper than that, and I wouldn't attempt it.  Lips sealed

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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

"Level crossings are safe, unless they are used in an unsafe manner."  Discuss.
ellendune
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« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2017, 11:00:30 PM »

I am well aware of the dangers of driving into deep water. The previous poster suggested that I should have my bank account drained simply because I think, and know, I could drive through standing water of a metre or so depth which I find a very odd concept indeed!

If you are then fine. Some people do not understand.  I wanted it to be clear.  I was not commenting on the possibility of a fine for trying. 

I forget to mention the possibility that a submerged bridge may have been washed away.
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chrisr_75
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« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2017, 11:28:13 PM »

On two occasions in the past, I have driven my Mercedes Sprinter van through standing floodwater, because I knew that it would not be more than two feet deep, on those particular stretches of road.

Any deeper than that, and I wouldn't attempt it.  Lips sealed



A previous colleague of mine once took our employers Transit tipper through a flooded stretch of the A487 between Machynlleth and Aberystwyth whilst I took a longer avoiding route through not wishing to attempt the floods in my Landrover...Apparently the water was lapping up around the windscreen...the van survived which is perhaps testament to the durability of the humble 'smiley face' Ford Transit!
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chrisr_75
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« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2017, 11:48:39 PM »

I am well aware of the dangers of driving into deep water. The previous poster suggested that I should have my bank account drained simply because I think, and know, I could drive through standing water of a metre or so depth which I find a very odd concept indeed!

If you are then fine. Some people do not understand.  I wanted it to be clear.  I was not commenting on the possibility of a fine for trying. 


Indeed. There have been a couple of cases in the past 10 years or so of people dying as a result of being washed away (one very close to where I live in fact, just a few months ago) and if I remember correctly, one of those where the driver survived resulted in a death by careless driving charge and subsequent imprisonment.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-11039483

Moving water is the biggest risk when attempting to navigate floods in a road vehicle, flood water is especially deceptive as it generally appears flat and still on the surface but can still be moving with some considerable velocity. Fording rivers which are in a normal flow state is a different kettle of fish entirely.
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #22 on: September 09, 2017, 11:55:13 PM »

Indeed: driving into moving floodwater is generally asking for trouble.  I wouldn't do that.  Wink

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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

"Level crossings are safe, unless they are used in an unsafe manner."  Discuss.
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