Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum Great Western Coffee Shop - [home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here]. Register and contribute [here] - it's free.
Random Image
Train Running @GWR Twitter Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail News GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4 Chat on off
September 21, 2017, 01:00:37 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: End of Wheelie Bins  (Read 235 times)
eightf48544
TransWilts Member
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3875


View Profile Email
« on: September 13, 2017, 04:25:19 PM »

Found this on Yahoo.

Wheelie bins in Cambridge are about to be replaced

The familiar sight of a wheelie bin in a front garden could soon be a thing of the past, after a UK city installed underground bins for residents to use.

The complex system, which has been introduced in north west Cambridgeshire, sees steel bin chutes being set into the pavement before they are then fed into larger underground chambers.

When the chambers are full, a sensor is then set off to alert and trigger a collection lorry.

The system has removed almost 9,000 bins, but it has also come with serious warnings that people could become stuck in a bottomless pit they choose to climb in.

Checked the calendar and it's definitely not April 1st.
Logged
ChrisB
TransWilts Member
Hero Member
******
Posts: 8656


View Profile Email
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 04:31:22 PM »

Can see "Rubbishburg" headlines, similar to the fatburgs found in sewer pipes....
Logged
stuving
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2523


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2017, 04:45:27 PM »

The complex system, which has been introduced in north west Cambridgeshire, sees steel bin chutes being set into the pavement before they are then fed into larger underground chambers.

Except ... not "north west Cambridgeshire", but Eddington, a new housing development in north west Cambridge. It's being built by the University, partly to house its graduate students and researchers without driving house prices through the roof. However, it will come complete with shops, schools, etc. so how you'll get to live there isn't clear (to me).

So this rubbish system is not introduced as in replacing anything, but there from scratch. I think it's all flats and high density housing (at least so far), so you'd otherwise have centralised waste "sheds" anyway. The picture don't show chutes with entrances in the pavement, but oversize bollard thingies (is there a word for that?):

But why let a fact get between a journalist [sic] and their story ..
Logged
chrisr_75
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 931


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2017, 01:10:01 AM »

They've had these quite widely across the Netherlands for many years, focused mainly on more densely populated parts of towns and cities. Seem to work fairly well from what I can see, although the 'general refuse' bins do tend to get a bit stinky in warm weather. A good idea to centralise refuse collection and take the storage of said refuge away from the immediate vicinity of people's homes.
Logged
ellendune
TransWilts Member
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2552


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2017, 07:40:55 AM »

Refuse chutes were used quite a lot in high rise buildings int he past, but they sometimes became blocked and the positioning of the store in the basement or ground floor of the block was a fire risk. They have not been preferred recently.  It will be interesting to see how different these are. 
Logged
chrisr_75
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 931


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 08:22:04 AM »

Those which I referred to in the Netherlands look a bit like a normal street bin above the surface with a hatch on the top which goes directly into a large underground container. In nearly 4 years of living there I never saw an overflowing or blocked one, nor a full litter bin on the street for that matter.

Best pic I could find is here:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recycling_in_the_Netherlands#/media/File%3AAmsterdam_recycling.jpg

Rubbish day rules are strictly enforced by the (armed) bin police, to the point they rummage through any errant black bags to identify its owner....!
Logged
stuving
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2523


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2017, 09:05:15 AM »

The same idea is used quite widely, but for recycling, in France. There is a "borne" above ground, which may be small or big enough to provide a chest-height entrance. These can appear in main streets and squares, where you wouldn't see the old bins and skips. Whether they really are that attractive is debatable - though at least the smell should be less (if not entirely absent).

If you do a Google image search on "bornes enterres" (!) you'll get pages of the things!
Logged
chrisr_75
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 931


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2017, 12:00:30 PM »

Sorry, I omitted the fact that they're used for materials for recycling, compostables and general landfill waste in NL.

The article I posted the photo from is quite enlightening about the rates of recycling in NL, where landfills are used for less than 10% of total waste. We could probably learn a few lessons from our beclogged neighbours. We probably wouldn't need wheelie bins if we recycled that much!
Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants