Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum [home] and [about]
Current travel advice 5.1.2021
Forum in and beyond Coronavirus
Travel & transport from BBC stories as at 16:55 19 Jan 2021
- Biden to block Trump's Covid rule change on president's final day in office
- Japan: One dead as snowstorm causes 130-car pile-up
* Covid: Marylebone rail workers 'held lockdown baby shower' at closed station patisserie
- Boeing 737 Max to be cleared to fly in Europe
Read about the forum [here].
Register [here] - it's free.
What do I gain from registering? [here]
 22/01/21 - TWSW - Decarbonisation
26/01/21 - SWR - Meet the manager
29/01/21 - FOSBR AGM - ONLINE
29/01/21 - TWSW- Town Centres
Random Image
Train Running Polls Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail news GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4
Next departures • Bristol Temple MeadsBath SpaChippenhamSwindonDidcot ParkwayReadingLondon PaddingtonMelksham
Exeter St DavidsTauntonWestburyTrowbridgeBristol ParkwayCardiff CentralOxfordCheltenham SpaBirmingham New Street
January 19, 2021, 05:05:47 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[105] A cuppa on Blue Monday - what's your tipple?
[90] Could you give up flying? Meet the no-plane pioneers
[44] G7 Summit - Cornwall - June 2021
[41] Ireland: South East On Track
[36] TravelWatch Southwest - Webinar 2 - Friday 22 January 2021 - D...
[32] Have members any suggestions for new names for GWR stations?
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5
  Print  
Author Topic: Porkway Partway  (Read 12318 times)
paul7755
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4811


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2017, 03:26:37 pm »

... Only later did the surfix "parkway" come to mean either a station with a large car park (what we would call Park and Ride today) or alternatively a station which is some distance from the town it serves (not the case with Didcot)

If "parkway stations" had to be named after the town they served, wouldn't they nearly all have to be named London Parkway?  Be a bit confusing on the way back... Smiley

Paul
Logged
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3212


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: October 10, 2017, 03:52:53 pm »

Bristol Parkway is so named because the M32 was, at the time of construction known as "The Bristol Parkway"  http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/bristol/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_7767000/7767453.stm.  The station is named after the road and its name has nothing to do with car parking.  "Parkway" was originally an American term applied to scenic roads designed from the outset for motorcars and placed through parkland or countryside which could be driven on for pleasure.  When it came to the UK, the term lost some of the scenic connotations, but retained the idea of being a new road cut through the countryside into the city.  Only later did the surfix "parkway" come to mean either a station with a large car park (what we would call Park and Ride today) or alternatively a station which is some distance from the town it serves (not the case with Didcot)
I think there's a difference between parkway and park & ride, in that a parkway station is mostly used to take passengers away from one town to another, whereas a park & ride is used to take them into the centre of an urban area. A parkway disperses, a park & ride collects and concentrates. It's quite possible I imagined the difference in order to explain the different names before I knew of the M32 origins of parkway, but even after learning that (I think I only learned it earlier this year), I still like to try to see this difference, aware that I'm partly kidding myself. Though I also think that the way we use park & ride stations might have changed over the last decade or so.
Logged

Waiting at Pilning for the midnight sleeper to Prague.
ellendune
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3769


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2017, 05:04:41 pm »

If "parkway stations" had to be named after the town they served, wouldn't they nearly all have to be named London Parkway?  Be a bit confusing on the way back... Smiley

Paul

That's a very Metropolitan centred comment if I may say so. 

Us out in the 'provinces' do go to other places by train you know.

Logged
stuving
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 5310


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2017, 05:53:03 pm »

There's no reason why a word can't evolve in meaning a bit at a time, from what Parkway meant, via a single example at Bristol, to become a recognisable marker for a station outside a town, suitable for people arriving by car, so they don't need to flog their way into the town centre. Now, I get the mental image from it of parkland (green fields) and a car park. The "way" bit does nothing to the meaning, but in Parkway as a label it needs to be there because Park is already in use for stations - you wouldn't like to confuse Worcester Parkway with Worcester Park.

The Portway half is not so very different. I understand Bristol Portway is recent, and was built for access to the new port facilities at he mouth of the Avon. The name Portway is old, and (while Wikipedia is uncharacteristically silent of the subject) I'm sure it comes from "port" as in portage, porterage, and porter - a road or route used for goods. Mind you that fits for the Bristol one too.
Logged
ellendune
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3769


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2017, 06:03:22 pm »

The Portway half is not so very different. I understand Bristol Portway is recent, and was built for access to the new port facilities at he mouth of the Avon. The name Portway is old, and (while Wikipedia is uncharacteristically silent of the subject) I'm sure it comes from "port" as in portage, porterage, and porter - a road or route used for goods. Mind you that fits for the Bristol one too.

I was taught at school that Portway meant the way (Anglo Saxon word meaning road) to the market (town).  There is a Portway along the bottom of the escarpment of the Berkshire Downs - that is nowhere near the sea! 
Logged
chuffed
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1378


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2017, 06:23:25 pm »

Judging by the squeals of the wheels on the Class 166's, the name Porkway Partway is very apt. Perhaps it could be marketed as the Oink, Oink, Stuffing and Crackling railway ??
Logged
Red Squirrel
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4054


There are some who call me... Tim


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2017, 06:37:55 pm »

There's no reason why a word can't evolve in meaning a bit at a time, from what Parkway meant, via a single example at Bristol, to become a recognisable marker for a station outside a town, suitable for people arriving by car, so they don't need to flog their way into the town centre. Now, I get the mental image from it of parkland (green fields) and a car park. The "way" bit does nothing to the meaning, but in Parkway as a label it needs to be there because Park is already in use for stations - you wouldn't like to confuse Worcester Parkway with Worcester Park.

I think you've missed Bmblbzzz's point - Bristol Parkway was never "a station outside a town, suitable for people arriving by car, so they don't need to flog their way into the town centre"; rather, it was and is a station where Bristol (or should I say 'West of England' - pah!) people catch trains to other faraway places. So quite the reverse of a park-and-ride. As to the etymology of 'Parkway', I think it is at least in part a portmanteau of Park (as in 'ditch the tinwork') + Railway.
Logged
martyjon
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1941


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2017, 06:49:08 pm »

Bristol Parkway was the winning name in a competition held jointly by BR and the Bristol Evening Post to name the new station when it was being built. The winning entrants comment was he chose the name to reflect the fact that you would drive your car to the station car park and use the railway. It was, as has been stated, the first of the Parkway stations, the next one being Mansfield and Alfreton Parkway.

It was built on part of the former Stoke Gifford marshalling yard.

At one time I was told that the farebox take at the station exceeded that of Temple Meads.
Logged
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 32088



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2017, 07:07:57 pm »

Tiverton and Bodmin Parkway strike me as being the modern equivalent of adding "Road" onto the end of a station name, to indicate that it's not an easy walk to the town centre, and with the added "flag" that it's easy for private car use. Others such as Warwick Parkway and Thame Parkway fall into the same camp.

Others such as Didcot Parkway are actually close by the town that they serve, but have a significant car to / from rail role - and we can add Wilton Parkway to that at soe stage.

Perhaps some other "Road" stations could be renamed? There are 50 stations with "Road" in their names, but many of those are named after a specific road - such as Navigation Road, London Road, Ferry Road, Victoria Road.  However, there's a ring to potential names like "Clarbeston Parkway", "Morchard Parkway" and "Llanbister Parkway", isn't there?
Logged

Coffee Shop Admin, Vice Chair of Melksham Rail User Group, and on the board of TravelWatch SouthWest.
stuving
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 5310


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2017, 07:17:43 pm »

I think you've missed Bmblbzzz's point - Bristol Parkway was never "a station outside a town, suitable for people arriving by car, so they don't need to flog their way into the town centre"; rather, it was and is a station where Bristol (or should I say 'West of England' - pah!) people catch trains to other faraway places. So quite the reverse of a park-and-ride. As to the etymology of 'Parkway', I think it is at least in part a portmanteau of Park (as in 'ditch the tinwork') + Railway.

And I think you've missed my points - that the word's meaning has changed from what is was initially (before Bristol had one), via the first examples, to what it is now. And also (though I didn't make this as clear as I might have) that without Wherever Parkway, the alternative station was in a town centre (Wherever or somewhere else), and that's where drivers would have to go to get a train.
Logged
Red Squirrel
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4054


There are some who call me... Tim


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2017, 08:07:35 pm »


...the word's meaning has changed from what is was initially (before Bristol had one), via the first examples, to what it is now. And also.. that without Wherever Parkway, the alternative station was in a town centre (Wherever or somewhere else), and that's where drivers would have to go to get a train.


For fear of a quibble too far, 'before Bristol had one' points to a time when the word had no rail-related meaning. But I do indeed take your point that whilst there was once a clear distinction between a Parkway station (for people leaving Wherever) and a Park and Ride (for people travelling into Wherever), that distinction has become blurred. Which is a shame, because it was a useful one.
Logged
johnneyw
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1569


Still want to be a train driver when I grow up


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2017, 11:12:06 pm »

Portway Parkway sounds too rolled off the current station naming machine conveyor belt. Plain 'Portway' would probably be better. Surely there must be a more inspiring name for a new stop on the line that carries the majesty of the Severn Riviera Express at the gateway to the Avon Gorge?
Logged
chuffed
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1378


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: October 11, 2017, 01:11:18 am »

Gadarene Gorge or Gadarene Gate might do. One might have a  problem deciding who the swine are ...the passengers or the TOC staff ! They will all be asked to avoid phrases like 'chop chop', 'I could murder a bacon roll', or 'we were crammed in like sausages' to so not to offend the aural sensibilties of our porcine neighbours.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 08:32:34 am by chuffed » Logged
Adelante_CCT
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1313



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: October 11, 2017, 08:07:27 am »

Any reason this topic is headed Partway and not Parkway?
Logged
chuffed
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1378


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: October 11, 2017, 08:35:12 am »

Just a bit of fun swapping the t and k around. Rumour has it that the latest train crew are called Harris & Walls, Richmond & Bowyer !
Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants

Jump to top of pageJump to Forum Home Page