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Author Topic: Brizzle Arenal....where to mi babber ?  (Read 4726 times)
Phantom
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« Reply #75 on: November 07, 2018, 10:22:28 am »

Music for old people... I guess that's what sells nowadays.

Hasn't that always been the demographic of audiences, the late teens / 20's will be at festivals and the little un's watching groups like Little Mix
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #76 on: November 07, 2018, 12:14:45 pm »

Music for old people... I guess that's what sells nowadays.

Hasn't that always been the demographic of audiences, the late teens / 20's will be at festivals and the little un's watching groups like Little Mix
So which of those are the old people?  Huh I think it's to do with rock and pop being mature art forms with artists having longer careers, as evidenced by Rod Stewart and The Spice Girls, or even Massive Attack, and the shift in bulk of disposable income from youngish to oldish as BNM pointed out. And that people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s tend to be in better health and fitness than in previous decades and don't want to stop doing what they've been doing for decades (ie gigging).

<Tenuously rail-related addition: Young people are less likely to own cars and if the venue is hard to access by train and bus... >
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TonyK
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« Reply #77 on: November 08, 2018, 11:31:30 pm »

My son will probably go to the Muse gig. I might ask him to get me a ticket too - I think I'll be away when they go on sale, and they won't take long to sell.
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metalrail
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« Reply #78 on: November 11, 2018, 11:35:11 am »

Is this the end of the Bristol Arena altogether?

Article in today's BBC news...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46140268

The worrying part being;

Cardiff's and Bristol's councils have been trying to create a venue that would attract major acts and fans from south Wales and the south west of England for a long time.

A scheme next to Temple Meads station was first mooted in 2003, but was scrapped in September, with Bristol's mayor calling the £150m project "too risky"
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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #79 on: November 11, 2018, 12:45:11 pm »

It would be nice to think that this was a sign of greater co-operation within the Severnside region... Cardiff gets the arena, Bristol gets the airport...
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #80 on: March 03, 2019, 09:06:47 pm »

Quote
Have Massive Attack gigs paved the way for an arena in Filton?
Malaysian investment firm YTL says it is pleased the gigs were "such a success"
When Massive Attack announced they would be playing two shows at a custom-built venue in Filton many people asked whether it would act as a test run for an arena.

First proposed 15 years ago, the road to an arena for Bristol has been long and arduous to say the least.

A row over where an arena would be built intensified in 2018, when plans for an arena at Temple Island were thrown out, leading the way for a privately-developed arena funded by Malaysian investment firm YTL in the Brabazon hangar on Filton Airfield

While YTL is yet to announce any official plans, it launched its own arena website and the team behind the project say they are hoping to be able to share proposals in the coming months.

Today (March 3), YTL Developments told Bristol Live how pleased it is the Massive Attack gigs were "such a success".

A spokesperson added: "It gives us confidence that, when the planned new rail and metrobus links are in place, a 16,000 capacity arena would certainly be able to handle the numbers."

However the thought of an arena at this location - on the border of Bristol and South Gloucestershire - has historically not sat well with critics, who say it should be in the city centre or nowhere.

Part of their reasoning is an arena on the outskirts of the city may not be economically beneficial to the city centre.

Some fear concert-goers would drive to a gig and stay only for a few hours before driving home, buying a Costa or McDonaldís on the way out of the city.

And this leads to the other main issue for critics of a Filton arena - how would people get to events on the edge of the city?

There are no obvious transport hubs. Only a few buses go past the hangars on Gloucester Road North. Patchway station is a little more than a mile away, but how easy is it to get a train there?

So when Massive Attack announced they would be playing on the airfield next to the Brabazon hangar, people were quick to predict long traffic delays and issues with the shuttle bus service organisers had arranged.

Some perhaps even thought those delays would be a sure fire signal there should not be an arena in Filton.

But reports of people getting stuck in traffic for hours on their way to and from the gigs never surfaced. Nor did tales of people stranded at bus stops because there were not enough shuttle buses to cater for the demand.

Instead gig-goers were quick to take praise the transport and parking organisation - although there were mixed reviews about the gig itself and issues surrounding card machines and long queues for the toilets and bar.

Now thatís not to say the transport organisation was seamless. There have been mixed reports about how long people had to queue to get out of the car park. Taxi drop-off and pick-up seemed to be the biggest source of complaints.

Not only had Uber drivers charging a premium but they also couldnít find their way into the venue to collect their passengers.

But for the most part people seem to have been impressed by what they saw - no major traffic issues and a good shuttle service from the venue to the city centre.

So what does this mean for arena plans at the Brabazon hangar?
On one hand it was a semi-successful test run which proved transport solutions could be a problem easily solved.

Thatís not to mention transport schemes already planned by Bristol and South Gloucestershire councils for the area, which will happen regardless of whether an arena is built at the site.

This includes a Temple Meads to Brabazon station rail link and a new metrobus route which will go directly through the new Brabazon neighbourhood.

YTL Developments, which owns the former airfield site, said it was pleased to see 14,000 fans "arrived and departed smoothly" for Massive Attack.

"It gives us confidence that when the planned new rail and metrobus links are in place a 16,000 capacity arena would certainly be able to handle the numbers," they added.

However this was a one-time event at a custom-built venue on the airfield. Being able to organise transport for one weekend does not mean every other event would take place without a glitch.

Not to mention that thousands of new homes are planned for just a stoneís throw away from the arena on the other side of the railway line.

How would this affect buses, taxis and cars bringing concert-goers to an arena? Maybe it won't? Who knows.

But it will be interesting to see is if YTL and Bristol City Council use this weekend as an example for why an arena should be built in Filton.
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TonyK
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« Reply #81 on: March 04, 2019, 10:17:31 am »

The last part of the article is the most telling. It is one thing holding a concert in an empty hangar on a disused airfield, but entirely another to have regular events so close to 5,000 homes miles from the city centre. YTL have said they will build the Arenal at no cost to the council, but expect somewhere between £50 million and £100 million to be spent by the councils on improved transport links. Bristol City Council will lose the income from the Arenal too, which if done properly (ie, not by Bristol City Council) would have been substantial.

There is a rumour circulating that YTL are faced with a bill running into hundreds of millions to decontaminate the site. I have no idea if that is accurate, but if it is too toxic for housing, how safe would it be for events. (For the record, I was not the only pilot to have "eased springs" behind the clubhouse before flying, but I don't think that would make much difference.)
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #82 on: March 04, 2019, 11:21:29 am »

The Massive Attack concert was in a purpose-built temporary shed rather than a disused hangar. As for transport links, First did put on a special bus service but I don't think that's quite what YTL had in mind.
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TonyK
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« Reply #83 on: March 04, 2019, 12:54:41 pm »

The Massive Attack concert was in a purpose-built temporary shed rather than a disused hangar. As for transport links, First did put on a special bus service but I don't think that's quite what YTL had in mind.

With other events, such as the balloon fiesta and the Tokyo thing, the additional bus services have been put on at the cost of some of the regular buses.
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Noggin
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« Reply #84 on: March 04, 2019, 04:32:31 pm »

The last part of the article is the most telling. It is one thing holding a concert in an empty hangar on a disused airfield, but entirely another to have regular events so close to 5,000 homes miles from the city centre. YTL have said they will build the Arenal at no cost to the council, but expect somewhere between £50 million and £100 million to be spent by the councils on improved transport links. Bristol City Council will lose the income from the Arenal too, which if done properly (ie, not by Bristol City Council) would have been substantial.

There is a rumour circulating that YTL are faced with a bill running into hundreds of millions to decontaminate the site. I have no idea if that is accurate, but if it is too toxic for housing, how safe would it be for events. (For the record, I was not the only pilot to have "eased springs" behind the clubhouse before flying, but I don't think that would make much difference.)

In the real world, holding large events in a large, pre-existing space in a relatively undeveloped part of the conurbation, close enough to mainline rail stations, park & rides and other transport infrastructure to be able to run shuttle-bus services, and to annoy relatively few people is probably a pretty pragmatic way to do things.

The city-centre site is cramped, will royally s***ew up the non-event traffic (especially when there are lots of parents collecting/dropping off) and in the event of a major incident occurring there's a big risk that it could catastrophically grid-lock the city, leading to major loss of life.

I suspect that much of that £50 to £100m figure for transport infrastructure is a negotiating position, or would have to be paid for anyway if you put housing/offices/industry on the site. Indeed, Filton probably is contaminated with jet fuel, asbestos and whatever other nasties have been used over the years, but to a certain extent that only really matters if you want to put houses/schools/parks on it.

As arenal island, don't forget that the council could probably flog it for a fairly hefty wedge once the university have finished their bit, and that it will likely add a lot more to council finances & jobs as high-density office development with leisure/retail ground floor than an arena.   
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #85 on: March 04, 2019, 05:54:01 pm »

The Massive Attack concert was in a purpose-built temporary shed rather than a disused hangar. As for transport links, First did put on a special bus service but I don't think that's quite what YTL had in mind.

With other events, such as the balloon fiesta and the Tokyo thing, the additional bus services have been put on at the cost of some of the regular buses.
That might not have been the case for Massive Attack as it was an evening event but it could clearly get to be a right pain if there were regular events demanding special buses.

What was the Tokyo thing?
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TonyK
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« Reply #86 on: March 04, 2019, 06:58:54 pm »

The Tokyo thing is an annual music event in Eastville park. It was en route to that a few years ago that about three train loads of students got on one train at Clifton Down then complained that it was dangerous before getting out and walking along the tracks. There is a very regular shuttle from Temple Meads, which seemed to be served by the buses normally plying the route to my home.
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martyjon
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« Reply #87 on: March 04, 2019, 10:34:38 pm »

There is also The Downs Festival Music Event.
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #88 on: March 04, 2019, 10:47:50 pm »

The Tokyo thing is an annual music event in Eastville park. It was en route to that a few years ago that about three train loads of students got on one train at Clifton Down then complained that it was dangerous before getting out and walking along the tracks. There is a very regular shuttle from Temple Meads, which seemed to be served by the buses normally plying the route to my home.
Ok, I remember hearing about that incident. I also remember hearing the event itself last summer (we're a couple of miles away). It wasn't that loud but it went on all weekend.
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TonyK
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« Reply #89 on: March 04, 2019, 11:21:49 pm »

I heard it, and I was living in Brislington at the time, about 3 miles away. I didn't mind about that, though, a bit of noise in cities is to be expected, and the wind was in the right direction to give me odd snatches of music before I dozed off. Plus in my younger days, around the mid-19th century, I went to quite a few rather loud music events in places that were sometimes closer to residents than you would think legal these days, so was part of the problem rather than the solution.
And, quite possible as a direct result of my choices then, my hearing isn't quite so acute these days.
Now, if memory serves me correctly, the highest point of Filton airfield is 226 feet above mean sea level, meaning that Patchway and Charlton Hayes (least said the better) will get to hear proceedings very well, but Bristol itself will not. The putative residents of those new houses between the railway line and Cribbs Causeway won't need tickets. And the man in Henbury who used to ring the control tower and Flight Ops every time somebody deviated from the standard departure leg might find another reason to complain.
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