Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum Great Western Coffee Shop - [home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here].
Register and contribute [here] - it's free.
 17/12/2018 - Removal of Severn Bridge Tolls
22/12/2018 - Christmas service changes
04/01/2019 - Look forward - 2019 Severnside
07/01/2019 - JSP consultation closes
10/01/2019 - CHRUG
14/01/2019 - TWSW Board
Random Image
Train Running @GWR Twitter Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail News GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4 Chat on off
December 15, 2018, 01:45:10 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[123] New Stations for Bristol Commuters
[96] Bristol Temple Meads Station redevelopment
[62] IETs into passenger service from 16 Oct 2017 and subsequent pe...
[52] Closure of Old Oak Common (81A) December 2018
[41] Great Western Main Line electrification - ongoing discussion
[37] Engineering Works - When were they advertised
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7
  Print  
Author Topic: Intercity Express Train (IET) failure, near Exeter, 13 September 2018  (Read 5125 times)
ChrisB
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 9756


View Profile Email
« Reply #75 on: September 18, 2018, 03:05:45 pm »

From a driver on uk.rail.....

Quote
> A guard on a train I was on the the next day said it was an air hose coupling that sheared.
 
Yes I’ve just had that confirmed - train hit something unknown followed by
huge loss of air, traced to broken pipe joint under nose of train.
Logged
Worcester_Passenger
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1144


View Profile
« Reply #76 on: September 18, 2018, 04:48:52 pm »

Seem to remember something similar with a 180 versus a pigeon on the Cotswold line some years back. The 180 lost all air.
Logged
broadgage
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2244



View Profile
« Reply #77 on: September 18, 2018, 07:05:58 pm »

Seem to remember something similar with a 180 versus a pigeon on the Cotswold line some years back. The 180 lost all air.

But was the pigeon alright ?
Logged

"When customers say that they want a seat, they dont mean they want to sit with their knees behind their ears so that 4 more can sit down. They mean that they want an extra coach so that 74 more can sit down"
"Capacity on intercity routes should be about number of vehicles, not compressing people"
Incider
Transport Scholar
Jr. Member
******
Posts: 18


View Profile
« Reply #78 on: September 18, 2018, 09:22:55 pm »

No point sending a fitter from Exeter. They won’t know anything about the train.

Hitachi have numerous fitters in the region, including travelling fitters, the nearest available fitter would have been sent.


I wasn't really just talking about Exeter. It was more a question of: has the change to Hiatchi staff looking after / fixing the trains (as opposed to GWR staff which is the case for the HST's) meant that staff who can fix issues will now take longer to get to incidents compared to similar GWR staff for HST's? 90 minutes away seems to be quite a distance away!

There’s Hitachi maintenance staff in Bristol, Laira and possibly Long Rock.  There’s also travelling Hitachi fitters for the South West based at Exeter, Plymouth, Truro and Penzance so for minor issues it shouldn’t take any longer.
The nearest maintenance facility is obviously Bristol, so any fault requiring specialist tools may have to come from Bristol.

No specialist tools needed, one thing that was very much against getting assistance to the train in a shorter timescale was the day long closure of the M5, no matter what contingency plans you have in place - within reason- can take into account exceptional occurrences like that.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 05:43:28 am by Incider » Logged
Thatcham Crossing
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 546


View Profile
« Reply #79 on: September 18, 2018, 09:43:15 pm »

Quote
Yes I’ve just had that confirmed - train hit something unknown followed by
huge loss of air, traced to broken pipe joint under nose of train.

Might I suggest that there might be some corporate relief at Hitachi and GWR that this train didn't simply break down, and that the incident was caused by an external factor, with low probability.

Not that I am saying that if they can, steps should be taken to investigate and mitigate a recurrence.
Logged
a-driver
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 688


View Profile
« Reply #80 on: September 18, 2018, 10:21:49 pm »

From a driver on uk.rail.....

Quote
> A guard on a train I was on the the next day said it was an air hose coupling that sheared.
 
Yes I’ve just had that confirmed - train hit something unknown followed by
huge loss of air, traced to broken pipe joint under nose of train.

I find that hard to believe, I can’t see how an object would be able to access any of the pipes under the nose of the train.  Considering the delay cost runs into a 5 figure sum, one wonders wether Hitachi are trying to wriggle out of it.
Logged
broadgage
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2244



View Profile
« Reply #81 on: September 18, 2018, 11:19:34 pm »

I am aware of at least one case in which a modern EMU was disabled after striking a goose, the impact of which broke an air connection.

So yes it is possible. If such incidents recur regularly then that suggests a need to make the relevant parts of the air system more impact resistant or easier to isolate.
If it was a very rare event, then (goose)shit happens!
Logged

"When customers say that they want a seat, they dont mean they want to sit with their knees behind their ears so that 4 more can sit down. They mean that they want an extra coach so that 74 more can sit down"
"Capacity on intercity routes should be about number of vehicles, not compressing people"
eightf48544
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4151


View Profile Email
« Reply #82 on: September 19, 2018, 09:16:41 am »

               A pertinant question I was asked whther it was a design fault, air pipe not protected or bad luck.

My answer was a bit of both. Trains hit or are  hit by objects, animal or mineral, quite often so should the brake pipe have been shielded? However, was it just bad luck that this object hit the brake pipe hard enough to break it?
Logged
bradshaw
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 365



View Profile
« Reply #83 on: September 19, 2018, 10:30:21 am »

The train computer should be able to identify where on the journey this happened. A sweep of the track at that point should help to see if there was anything amiss.
Logged
IndustryInsider
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6838


View Profile
« Reply #84 on: September 19, 2018, 11:06:45 am »

A leak of that severity would probably deplete the supply very quickly.  Also of course there will be damage that should be quite easily determined as to whether it was component failure or a foreign object.  That said the waters are always muddied a little by all parties involved desperately trying to prove they weren’t at fault!
Logged

To view my cab run over the new Reading Viaduct as well as a relief line cab ride at Reading just after Platforms 12-15 opened and my 'before and after' video comparison of the Cotswold Line Redoubling scheme, see: http://www.dailymotion.com/user/IndustryInsider/1
Timmer
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4872


View Profile
« Reply #85 on: September 19, 2018, 11:24:33 am »

That said the waters are always muddied a little by all parties involved desperately trying to prove they weren’t at fault!
That's our joined up 'Britain's rail companies working together' for you.  Roll Eyes
Logged
bignosemac
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 16279


Question everything.


View Profile
« Reply #86 on: September 22, 2018, 04:47:21 am »

An update from NewsBiscuit:

Quote
NEW HIGH-SPEED TRAIN FOUND TO BE INCOMPATIBLE WITH PACE OF LIFE IN DEVON

Initial investigations into the breakdown of a high-speed train just north of Exeter indicate that it should have been travelling more slowly in recognition of the speed at which the local population gets things done.

Several hundred passengers had to be rescued from the stricken Hitachi 800 and taken to the local village café where they were each expected to discuss the weather and that nice man who asks the questions on The Chase before being served a cup of tea and a slice of home-made cake.

The train operator GWR apologised for the breakdown via social media but, as Twitter is considered a bit frantic in Devon, GWR also plans to issue hand-written letters. They should reach everyone by a week next Wednesday if they can post them in the next couple of days.

Local residents weren’t surprised that the train came to a standstill, however. ‘All that rushing about, no-one needs none of that and these new high-speed trains are not right,’ explained Mrs Jan Hewlett. ‘They should learn to take their time and only when they’ve been doing things at our pace for 20 years will they be accepted around here.’

A GWR spokesman said that automatic rolling stock velocity management systems based on measurements of the local pace of life were being trialled, with trains hurtling out of London and slowing down as they approach the West Country. ‘However, we’re having a few teething troubles,’ he admitted. ‘They tend to come to a complete halt as they approach Penzance.
Logged

Time flies by when you're a driver of a train,
Speeding out of Trumpton with a cargo of cocaine.
Thatcham Crossing
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 546


View Profile
« Reply #87 on: September 22, 2018, 08:11:22 am »

In amongst the slightly patronising humour, a statement of fact....

Quote
trains hurtling out of London and slowing down as they approach the West Country
Logged
Charlie (in Gloucester)
Transport Scholar
Sr. Member
******
Posts: 287


View Profile
« Reply #88 on: September 22, 2018, 10:35:35 am »

Trains break down? Send ‘em back.
Logged

Regular GWR user between Gloucester and Swindon.
broadgage
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2244



View Profile
« Reply #89 on: September 22, 2018, 11:43:22 am »

I cant speak for Devon, but here in Somersetshire we move with the times.
On the Minehead branch line was recently demonstrated a new type of train, this appears to have no locomotive nor any fireman, but proceeds under the direction of only a driver. It does however make an odd noise and may frighten horses.
Logged

"When customers say that they want a seat, they dont mean they want to sit with their knees behind their ears so that 4 more can sit down. They mean that they want an extra coach so that 74 more can sit down"
"Capacity on intercity routes should be about number of vehicles, not compressing people"
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants