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Author Topic: Transport secretary - on subjects beyond transport  (Read 5309 times)
TonyK
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« Reply #45 on: January 22, 2019, 10:22:33 pm »

OTC = onthecushions.

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BNM

I used to be FT, N! back in the day.
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grahame
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« Reply #46 on: January 31, 2019, 08:59:22 pm »

At a risk of stirring. From the Huffington Post

Quote
Transport Secretary Chris Grayling Explains Why He Thinks People Want Him To Resign
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« Reply #47 on: January 31, 2019, 11:05:50 pm »

At a risk of stirring. From the Huffington Post

Quote
Transport Secretary Chris Grayling Explains Why He Thinks People Want Him To Resign

Looks like the interview has been widely published - from The Mirror

Quote
Chris Grayling has blamed the criticism he receives on the prominent rail union RMT and his support for Brexit .

The Transport Secretary, who oversaw a chaotic train timetable upgrade which caused misery for thousands, insisted he gets attacked because of the tough decisions he makes.


Passengers in the north and south-east of England suffered delays and cancellations for several weeks after train timetables were changed on May 20.

Commuters have also had to contend with rising fares and other problems.

But Mr Grayling blamed the flak he receives on the RMT union who he says "regards Jeremy Corbyn's Labour party as too right wing to affiliate to".

He told the House magazine: "The railways need to modernise. So, inevitably, from an organised left-wing trade union, you're going to get some missiles fired. But I'm going to do what I think is right."
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CyclingSid
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« Reply #48 on: February 11, 2019, 01:14:11 pm »

Another not exactly glowing commendation:
 https://inews.co.uk/opinion/chris-grayling-ferry-contract-brexit-failing/
but I am sure the ship will sail on. Probably like one I had when much younger, with wheels on the bottom (preferably not train wheels). I suppose if it has wheels it is unsinkable?
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TonyK
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« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2019, 02:07:08 pm »

Our Fayling man took a lot of recent flak when the Courts' computer system went town, leaving barristers all mouth and no briefs. This was his major project before heading to transport to sort out the problems there. Not my usual chip-wrapper, but Yasmin Qureshi, admittedly less than impartial, the New Statesman was less than complimentary, and she was certainly not alone. The BBC News at One had an interview with a barrister who laid the blame squarely at Mr Grayling's door.

Quote
Chris Grayling’s court reforms have brought our justice system to its knees
Recent technological failures underline the disastrous consequences of the government’s misguided modernisation drive.

BY YASMIN QURESHI

Phones disconnected. Computers offline. Probation officers forced to write letters to prisoners by hand. This was the reality of life in England and Wales’ dysfunctional courts system last week, with the Ministry of Justice crippled by its ageing IT system.

Thousands of cases were disrupted across England and Wales as the court service’s main computer network repeatedly crashed. Staff were left in the dark about when defendants were due to appear, which led to prosecutions being adjourned in a number of cases. Phones, computers, printers and emails stopped functioning.

These issues caused a near total breakdown in the functioning of our courts. Laptops were passed around courtrooms, connected to the internet via mobile phone data. In country that has historically made claims to being a world leader in the provision of justice, such total ineptitude is unacceptable.

With the government pushing ahead with its £1.2bn courts modernisation programme, introduced by Chris Grayling in 2014 – in which digitisation is used to justify closures across the country – this breakdown is particularly worrying. Though attempts to keep our justice system up to date with greater use of digital systems and developing technologies are not without merit, this, clearly, is not what is happening.

Instead, last week’s breakdown is indicative of an approach that cuts corners and leaves basic resources underdeveloped. My strong impression from visiting Crown Courts and speaking to staff across the country is that of underpaid workers enduring poor conditions and an IT system that is simply not fit for purpose.

For anyone involved in the justice system, last week’s events are not the first evidence that the government’s reforms are unlikely to succeed. Expensive public consultations on court closures are routinely ignored when citizens make clear they want to keep them local and genuinely accessible. More cuts are expected to staffing numbers and will cause even greater problems, with over 5,000 people predicted to lose their jobs by 2023. It is incredible that these cuts are planned when we have already reached the point where the chair of the Criminal Bar Association has described our courts system as “on its knees”, blaming “savage cuts to the MoJ budget”.

It is clear then that to really understand what has taken place over the last week we need to place these events in a longer history. Our justice system has been mauled by savage cuts which by 2020 will amount to a 40 per cent reduction since 2010. Around a third of our courts have been sold since then, and legal aid has been mercilessly cut.

As is so often the case with the government’s ideological mania to reduce spending, the issue is not only that it hits the most vulnerable hardest and cuts holes in a safety net that this country spent decades developing. It is that it fails on its own terms. Poorly planned measures designed to reduce short-term costs will inevitably lead to long-term problems. Some will be overt, like the systemic failure of an under-resourced IT system. Others will be less obvious but even more profound, as our social fabric is torn by rising inequalities in access to justice.

Last week’s breakdown shone an overdue spotlight on our courts. What we can see is not pretty. These problems are not one-offs. Rather, they are symptomatic of a very deep rot. That decay will not stop once the wifi is back. The Association of District Judges recently called for courts closures to be stopped until “fully functioning IT systems are demonstrated to be up and running successfully”. That is the very least that should happen. Huge sums have been paid to private contractors including Atos and Microsoft to manage systems that are functioning poorly. They too must face close scrutiny.

But for this country to have a truly fair, sustainable and effective courts and tribunals system we must go beyond immediate measures. We need a government that will ensure that any digital upgrade goes hand-in-hand with a genuine commitment to equal access to justice. To do that, we need to face up to the fact that a decent justice system requires long-term planning and proper, sustainable funding.

Yasmin Qureshi is Labour MP for Bolton South East and a shadow justice minister.

I have said elsewhere that Mr Grayling is unlikely to survive in cabinet once his use as a loyal supporter of the Prime Minister passes.



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TaplowGreen
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« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2019, 05:30:35 pm »

Our Fayling man took a lot of recent flak when the Courts' computer system went town, leaving barristers all mouth and no briefs. This was his major project before heading to transport to sort out the problems there. Not my usual chip-wrapper, but Yasmin Qureshi, admittedly less than impartial, the New Statesman was less than complimentary, and she was certainly not alone. The BBC News at One had an interview with a barrister who laid the blame squarely at Mr Grayling's door.

Quote
Chris Grayling’s court reforms have brought our justice system to its knees
Recent technological failures underline the disastrous consequences of the government’s misguided modernisation drive.

BY YASMIN QURESHI

Phones disconnected. Computers offline. Probation officers forced to write letters to prisoners by hand. This was the reality of life in England and Wales’ dysfunctional courts system last week, with the Ministry of Justice crippled by its ageing IT system.

Thousands of cases were disrupted across England and Wales as the court service’s main computer network repeatedly crashed. Staff were left in the dark about when defendants were due to appear, which led to prosecutions being adjourned in a number of cases. Phones, computers, printers and emails stopped functioning.

These issues caused a near total breakdown in the functioning of our courts. Laptops were passed around courtrooms, connected to the internet via mobile phone data. In country that has historically made claims to being a world leader in the provision of justice, such total ineptitude is unacceptable.

With the government pushing ahead with its £1.2bn courts modernisation programme, introduced by Chris Grayling in 2014 – in which digitisation is used to justify closures across the country – this breakdown is particularly worrying. Though attempts to keep our justice system up to date with greater use of digital systems and developing technologies are not without merit, this, clearly, is not what is happening.

Instead, last week’s breakdown is indicative of an approach that cuts corners and leaves basic resources underdeveloped. My strong impression from visiting Crown Courts and speaking to staff across the country is that of underpaid workers enduring poor conditions and an IT system that is simply not fit for purpose.

For anyone involved in the justice system, last week’s events are not the first evidence that the government’s reforms are unlikely to succeed. Expensive public consultations on court closures are routinely ignored when citizens make clear they want to keep them local and genuinely accessible. More cuts are expected to staffing numbers and will cause even greater problems, with over 5,000 people predicted to lose their jobs by 2023. It is incredible that these cuts are planned when we have already reached the point where the chair of the Criminal Bar Association has described our courts system as “on its knees”, blaming “savage cuts to the MoJ budget”.

It is clear then that to really understand what has taken place over the last week we need to place these events in a longer history. Our justice system has been mauled by savage cuts which by 2020 will amount to a 40 per cent reduction since 2010. Around a third of our courts have been sold since then, and legal aid has been mercilessly cut.

As is so often the case with the government’s ideological mania to reduce spending, the issue is not only that it hits the most vulnerable hardest and cuts holes in a safety net that this country spent decades developing. It is that it fails on its own terms. Poorly planned measures designed to reduce short-term costs will inevitably lead to long-term problems. Some will be overt, like the systemic failure of an under-resourced IT system. Others will be less obvious but even more profound, as our social fabric is torn by rising inequalities in access to justice.

Last week’s breakdown shone an overdue spotlight on our courts. What we can see is not pretty. These problems are not one-offs. Rather, they are symptomatic of a very deep rot. That decay will not stop once the wifi is back. The Association of District Judges recently called for courts closures to be stopped until “fully functioning IT systems are demonstrated to be up and running successfully”. That is the very least that should happen. Huge sums have been paid to private contractors including Atos and Microsoft to manage systems that are functioning poorly. They too must face close scrutiny.

But for this country to have a truly fair, sustainable and effective courts and tribunals system we must go beyond immediate measures. We need a government that will ensure that any digital upgrade goes hand-in-hand with a genuine commitment to equal access to justice. To do that, we need to face up to the fact that a decent justice system requires long-term planning and proper, sustainable funding.

Yasmin Qureshi is Labour MP for Bolton South East and a shadow justice minister.

I have said elsewhere that Mr Grayling is unlikely to survive in cabinet once his use as a loyal supporter of the Prime Minister passes.





…………...can you tell me the winner of this year's Grand National please?  Wink
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bignosemac
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« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2019, 05:41:23 pm »

The bookies.
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TonyK
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« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2019, 06:33:36 pm »

Morten Morland caught the mood with his cartoon today in The Times.

« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 11:58:36 am by Tony (Ex FT, N!) » Logged

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« Reply #53 on: February 15, 2019, 01:40:43 pm »

Chris Grayling 'probably most incompetent minister of all time' says Michael Portillo.
That wouldn't be a case of 'kettle calling pot, black' would it, Mr P ?
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TonyK
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« Reply #54 on: February 15, 2019, 02:35:08 pm »

Chris Grayling 'probably most incompetent minister of all time' says Michael Portillo.
That wouldn't be a case of 'kettle calling pot, black' would it, Mr P ?

Now Mr P was my minister at one time, and didn't do a bad job at all. He caused far less damage than some before and since, which in the Civil Service is a compliment.
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bignosemac
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« Reply #55 on: March 01, 2019, 10:37:34 am »

https://newsthump.com/2019/03/01/huge-fire-engulfs-department-of-transport-after-chris-grayling-tries-to-use-stapler/

"The human question mark"

Made I laff.  Grin
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rogerw
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« Reply #56 on: March 01, 2019, 11:31:42 am »

Yes.Yet another damning report about his actions when in charge of Justice
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TonyK
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« Reply #57 on: March 01, 2019, 12:02:25 pm »


#MeToo
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bignosemac
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« Reply #58 on: March 02, 2019, 02:35:49 pm »

I suppose Chris Grayling can't be personally blamed for all the poor decisions of the DfT under his charge. He's signing off on poorly thought out plans, I doubt he's thinking them all up himself. I suspect he doesn't have the nous or creativity.

It's more like a lunatic running the asylum.
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CyclingSid
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« Reply #59 on: March 02, 2019, 04:06:14 pm »

It is sometimes difficult to work out who should be wearing the white coats.
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