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Author Topic: Is your name unusual or unique?  (Read 2572 times)
CyclingSid
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« Reply #30 on: December 26, 2019, 08:57:55 am »

I had this feeling that Weymouth was about to make an appearance!
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Robin Summerhill
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« Reply #31 on: December 26, 2019, 11:32:34 am »

Quote from: grahame
... "Also bear in mind that the vast majority of married women didn't work in those days".   Hmm - formally, not - but they were very much involved in supporting their husbands and in many cases perhaps worked harder.... (snip) 

Hmmm indeed. And you missed a few things off that list, not the least of which was being almost permanently pregnant over their fertile years. But - and it's a big but - we are talking at least 100 years ago when things were very very different from how we see them today.

And that applied of course to both sexes. We may do well to recall what WW1 veteran Harry Patch had to say about going over the top. "You had about six seconds to make up your mind whether to go over to face almost certain death, or stay behind and be shot by your own side for cowardice." And a lot of those in that situation were lads still in their late teens and would be considered little more than children by society today.

I meant, and I am sure you knew I meant really, that women generally did not work for an employer after marriage in those days.

But there were, in a way, some small upsides compared to what we have today. There was a baker and a butcher in most villages, and local farmers would sell their produce to the locals rather than send it off to market (where much of the perishable stuff would have gone off by the time it got there anyway). If you did live somewhere more remote the chances were that somebody with a horse and cart would come round every week and sell you provisions at your door. To an extent I witnessed the last vestiges of that way of life when I was a lad - my mother went to the shops, about a 5-minute walk away, virtually every morning clutching her shopping bag, and if all of what she wanted wouldn't fit in the bag that day, then she bought it the following day.
 
Quote from: grahame
Severn Beach was brought up somewhat tongue in cheek.  Weston or Weymouth more popular??

That wouldn't have happened until the railways came, and even when they did...
It is about 70 miles from Melksham to Weymout, or 140 miles return. Even on a Parliamentary train at 1d per mile, to get two people there and back would have cost 1..3s..4d, with any accommodation costs on top of that of course. And if you were earning between 2 and 3 per week, that is half of a week's wages gone in one go. Of course, if your new father in law was better off and your new wife came with a dowry (you know, those amounts of money paid in ancient days by men to other men to take what were considered useless daughters off their hands...) that might have been a different matter. Smiley

Always remember the old saying "the past is a foreigh country. They do things differently there."
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Andy
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« Reply #32 on: March 06, 2020, 05:19:12 pm »

I'm in the unique list.

Excellent.  Grin

Don't get carried away!

It's only a small sample of one census district - 10-20,000 I'd guess - or if it's only the town itself even fewer. Being a census, the names won't all be as registered or christened either; what people provided varied a lot as to full "proper" names vs. everyday or family ones, whether enumerators tidied up the form or spelling varied too. In 1911 each form was filled in by the householder, leading to more mistakes, bad writing, misunderstandings, etc. One quite easy one to do is to put the age in the wrong column, so changing the sex - and it's also not too hard to write "son" and "dau" so it could be either! (At least one on the list above arose like that.)

And then there's all the issues of transcription (enumerators were not all chosen for their clear hand). And for those with "good" handwriting there's the "curse of italic"; once that style becomes dominant in the later 1800s some letter pairs become effectively the same. In my Mum's family is a bunch called Mouser, or is that Monser? Non-one at the GRO could tell, so they were often indexed under both names (not so unusual for surnames, but rare for given names). Looking at the originals, I can't tell either until later on when the typewriter arrives. Plus of course there's Graham's transfer of the list into a post (unless that was automated).


In 1911 the literacy rate among older residents would not have been that high either, so the concept of "right spelling" of their name could be problematic. There was an Evelyn Bennett in Suffolk in the 1870s - at least that's how it was usually spelled. His birth was registered as Evelin (as was first census) and his marriage as Eveylen (in the GRO indexes). When asked in court how it should be spelled, he replied "I'm blowed if I know!". Neither he nor his father did spellings, of course.

I hear you! I've encountered almost all these issues in family tree research. If you don't mind "Carry On" humour, in my family tree can be found a "Fanny Gardener", a "Fanny Hoare" and a "Dick Basher" (all names, not occupations) and a Newey Ould (offspring of the union of a Mr Ould and Ms Newey). Recent colleagues include Messers Fatfat (who isn't), and Phuc Ngo....
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2020, 01:29:27 am »

Another, perhaps surprising, disappearance is Christopher. It was big in the 1950s ...

Excuse me!  Shocked

I was born in March 1959 and was named Christopher.  Somewhere, I have an original cutting from the Times, or the Telegraph, announcing my birth. Roll Eyes

The Coffee Shop forum member now known as Chris from Nailsea. Wink
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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

"Level crossings are safe, unless they are used in an unsafe manner."  Discuss.
smokey
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« Reply #34 on: April 10, 2020, 01:49:01 pm »

Another, perhaps surprising, disappearance is Christopher. It was big in the 1950s ...

Excuse me!  Shocked

I was born in March 1959 and was named Christopher.  Somewhere, I have an original cutting from the Times, or the Telegraph, announcing my birth. Roll Eyes

The Coffee Shop forum member now known as Chris from Nailsea. Wink


Chris, fairly Regular name,

From,  Very uncommon middle name,

Nailsea, well I know of no other Mr (Mrs, or Miss) Nailsea so I'd say an uncommon surname.   Grin Grin
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smokey
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« Reply #35 on: April 10, 2020, 01:55:50 pm »

Tarquin.?..

Lovely Name, 

Several Tarquin's (surname Gin) in my local Pub.

Oh for the day when my local reopens!  Huh
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