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Author Topic: Buffer Stop Testing - 1945 Style  (Read 813 times)
ellendune
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« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2020, 06:46:01 pm »

The most common mode of failure seemed to be the rails breaking at the fishplates at the first joint away from the buffer stops followed by the movement of that whole section of track together with the buffer stops. 
Is that a failure? Isn't it the intended way for it to dissipate energy? The idea, I take it, is to provide something much cheaper than an engineered solution using hydraulics (like the ones being removed from Paddington) or torturing a steel bar (as used in fenders for big ships). But the requirement is the same: to stop a train without destroying it before it goes off to pay a social call on the neighbours.

It may be intended as you say, but in the strict technical sense it is the mode of failure. 
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« Reply #16 on: April 25, 2020, 10:05:10 pm »

Modern buffer stops have to have a 20m safety zone beyond them.  That can be reduced (or even increased) following Risk Assessment.

Indeed, they have sheer bolts and friction clamps to absorb the energy.

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« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2020, 10:39:03 am »

STE. Why have Red lights on buffer stops been replaced by two white verticle lights.

It is most confusing looking West from the Manor at Slough. Keep thinking it's a train coming.
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Oxonhutch
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« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2020, 11:10:49 am »

STE. Why have Red lights on buffer stops been replaced by two white verticle lights.

It is most confusing looking West from the Manor at Slough. Keep thinking it's a train coming.

But if they were red, you would keep thinking that you have just missed your train !  Grin

I'll let II give the definitive answer - but it is something to do with where they could be confused with a red signal next to a running line, they are made to be white instead.
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SandTEngineer
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« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2020, 12:09:42 pm »

STE. Why have Red lights on buffer stops been replaced by two white verticle lights.

It is most confusing looking West from the Manor at Slough. Keep thinking it's a train coming.

Buffer Stop lamps are red except where confusion may result in them being seen out of context by an approaching train on an adjacent line, when they will be white.  This usually happens on curves.
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eightf48544
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« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2020, 10:53:17 am »

I'll let II give the definitive answer - but it is something to do with where they could be confused with a red signal next to a running line, they are made to be white instead.

Buffer Stop lamps are red except where confusion may result in them being seen out of context by an approaching train on an adjacent line, when they will be white.  This usually happens on curves.

Thanks, both contexts seem to apply at Slough. Confusion with Red running signal and a curve.
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