Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum
GWR advice during Coronavirus
Coffee Shop during Coronavirus
Great Western Coffee Shop - [home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here].
Register [here] - it's free.
What do I gain from registering? [here]
 08/07/2020 - Melksham RUG - ONLINE
15/07/2020 - Harness social media - ONLINE
22/07/2020 - Melksham Rail User Group
16/09/2020 - Melksham Rail User Group
Random Image
Train Running Polls Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail news GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4
Next departures • Bristol Temple MeadsBath SpaChippenhamSwindonDidcot ParkwayReadingLondon PaddingtonMelksham
Exeter St DavidsTauntonWestburyTrowbridgeBristol ParkwayCardiff CentralOxfordCheltenham SpaBirmingham New Street
July 04, 2020, 07:23:04 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[122] New arrivals at Swindon
[80] More dangerous overcrowding to the Westcountry
[62] Front of the bubble [DotD 10.4.2020]
[44] TransWilts leases Wiltshire Council land at Melksham Station f...
[44] West of England Line CMSP study
[36] Public Transport users - please be patient for another week or...
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: Railway anecdotes from bygone days  (Read 1563 times)
Electric train
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3279


The future is 25000 Volts AC 750V DC has its place


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2020, 07:01:36 am »

I was in charge of a team working in a large 25kV switching station, 16 track circuit breakers, just outside London.

We were replacing circuit protection relays, quite invasive work which took a day to do per breaker we were doing one circuit breaker at a time.

When working in these buildings, especially just outside a large London terminal station, the passing of trains just blends into the background as such you don't notice them …….. until …….

.

They stop running  Shocked


Concerned that we had done something I phoned the ECR

.

The ECR said - there had been a "power surge" in central London   Huh

There suggestion was we make the site safe and go home avoiding central London.

The date - 07-07-2005

(Date corrected)
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 06:41:33 pm by Electric train » Logged

Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him.     
Dwight D. Eisenhower
TonyK
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5059


The artist formerly known as Four Track, Now!


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2020, 08:05:29 am »

My old Linn amplifier used to cut out if we ran it hard at parties,pop it in the freezer for ten minutes and bobs your uncle music again.🙂

That worked for the remote control of my first ever video recorder, too! I was told by my optician a couple of years back, that a spell in the freezer will cure slow reactive lenses that stay dark long after you have entered the restaurant. Take them off first, obviously.
Logged

Now, please!
smokey
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1077


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2020, 12:35:08 pm »

I was in charge of a team working in a large 25kV switching station, 16 track circuit breakers, just outside London.

We were replacing circuit protection relays, quite invasive work which took a day to do per breaker we were doing one circuit breaker at a time.

When working in these buildings, especially just outside a large London terminal station, the passing of trains just blends into the background as such you don't notice them …….. until …….

.

They stop running  Shocked


Concerned that we had done something I phoned the ECR

.

The ECR said - there had been a "power surge" in central London   Huh

There suggestion was we make the site safe and go home avoiding central London.

The date - 07-07-2015

Why what happened on that day.

!0 years earlier the London Bombings Occurred! 

seilf emit!
Logged
Electric train
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3279


The future is 25000 Volts AC 750V DC has its place


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2020, 06:42:17 pm »

I was in charge of a team working in a large 25kV switching station, 16 track circuit breakers, just outside London.

We were replacing circuit protection relays, quite invasive work which took a day to do per breaker we were doing one circuit breaker at a time.

When working in these buildings, especially just outside a large London terminal station, the passing of trains just blends into the background as such you don't notice them …….. until …….

.

They stop running  Shocked


Concerned that we had done something I phoned the ECR

.

The ECR said - there had been a "power surge" in central London   Huh

There suggestion was we make the site safe and go home avoiding central London.

The date - 07-07-2015

Why what happened on that day.

!0 years earlier the London Bombings Occurred! 

seilf emit!

Typo of the date  Roll Eyes
Logged

Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him.     
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Robin Summerhill
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 736


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2020, 10:18:35 am »

As this thread has gone quiet for almost a fortnight and I am sure that there must be other stories out there to tell, I am “bumping” the thread this morning with a tale of a tale that got away.

I got off the 1623 "stopper" from Gloucester to Bristol at Coaley Junction on 19th December 1964, a fortnight before the station closed, and went on south on the next train about an hour later. On asking the Porter whether he had any LMS tickets he answered in the affirmative - they were child privilege single blank cards. And as I was a child with an entitlement to privilege tickets, I bought a selection.
 
These were "LMS" tickets so they would have been printed prior to 1948. I was in Coaley Junction in late 1964, nearly 17 years after the LMS had ceased to exist. From the serial numbers on the tickets it is clear that only 16 tickets had been sold from the time that they had been delivered (at the latest in December 1947) and my visit in 1964, and then 6 went within 5 minutes!
 

It was common practice to have the next ticket for issue standing upright in the rack - this also helped when cashing up at the end of the day because if a ticket was still standing in the front of the rack it meant that none of those had been sold. Clearly ticket 17 had been standing at the front of the rack being exposed to light (and tobacco smoke in those days of course) for a long time, hence its discoloration.
 
In conversation with the porter on duty that day, it came to light that he knew my father, as he worked in the Signal & Telegraph department and would have been in Coaley from time to time. He said: "When you get home, ask him about the donkey!" So I did, and I recall a funny story being told that evening in December 1964. The trouble is, I can't remember it now - old age gets to us all in one way or another...!
 
A larger version of the inage can be seen here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/93122458@N08/18304177294/

Logged
Robin Summerhill
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 736


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2020, 08:51:41 pm »

The Great Central – my part in trying to prevent its downfall

The Great Central Railway closed between Aylesbury and Rugby, and from Nottingham to Sheffield, on 5th September 1966. The bit in between followed in 1969. I used it on a number of occasions in the last year of its operation, and two of my tickets have survived, including no. 8417, which was issued on the last day, Sunday 4th September.

In those days, there were two possible ways to travel overnight from Sheffield to Bristol. The Newcastle to Bristol Mail left the Midland station at about 2315 and landed you in Bristol at about 0435. The alternative was the York to Swindon train from Sheffield Victoria just after midnight, via the Great Central, Banbury, Oxford and Didcot West Curve, and this was extended to Bristol on Sunday mornings only, arriving at about 0745. The advantage of using the Great Central route was that, by the time the train got you to Bristol, the buses had started running and that avoided a 4-mile walk home to Stockwood (my only income back then being from newspaper rounds, taxis were out of the question!). The buses were still safely tucked up in their depots and the crews mainly still tucked up in bed at 0435 on a Sunday morning in those days.

It would not be uncharitable to say that passenger loadings on this train left something to be desired. One Sunday morning the train, comprising one coach and a number of parcels vans, pulled up in Chippenham and I saw a bloke selling newspapers from a barrow on the platform. I got out to buy one, and so did the rest of the train’s entire passenger complement. There were four of us, and two of them were footplate staff going home “on the cushions.” I had a free pass. I often wondered if the other bloke on the train was actually paying the railway some money to be there…

On the very last morning of all, 4th September 1966, the train was terminated at Swindon because engineering work had closed the line, and I was rudely awakened by someone telling me that a replacement bus service was awaiting my pleasure outside the station. In fact, as I recall, I was rudely awakened twice, because the first time I went straight back to sleep again (when you had a compartment to yourself in Mk1 stock then the bench seat could be remarkably comfy...)

That bus ran from Swindon to Bristol with only me on it - on a child privilege single from Sheffield Victoria to Bristol TM costing 6/11 (that's nearly 35 pence if you want it in new money). A microcosm, perhaps, of why so many railway lines closed in the 1960s.

If any classic bus enthusiasts are reading this, it was a Bristol MW on the rail replacement job...

As I was 14 at the time, it might be worth mentioning that in those days half fare children’s tickets were only available between the ages of 3 and 14. However, children of railway staff had that concession extended to their 15th birthday, hence the “child” tickets.

A final twist to the story came in September 2006, when the new heritage Great Central Railway was commemorating 40 years since the line’s closure. In their Gala for that weekend, they offered a free ride to anybody who could produce a ticket issued for the line on the last day of operation. Suffice to say, ticket 8417 came out of store and returned to Quorn & Woodhouse station, and the resulting complimentary ticket also appears in this collection.


A larger version of that ticket scan appears here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/93122458@N08/19913805372/

Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants

Jump to top of pageJump to Forum Home Page