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Author Topic: Significant minority find lockdown 'extremely difficult', poll suggests  (Read 12835 times)
Oxonhutch
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« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2020, 08:46:52 pm »

I seem to recall reading - for I wasn't around - that during the last global disagreement (RAF (Royal Air Force) Germany refered to it as the Second Great Misunderstanding) beer was never on the ration, nor was it ever in short supply. There are some things that society expects to continue. Ladies and gentlemen - I raise my glass - Good health!!
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broadgage
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« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2020, 09:44:08 pm »

Beer was indeed not rationed during the last war, but it was at times in short supply. Some pubs had to close for several days a week whilst awaiting deliveries.

Spirits were "sort of" rationed. Retailers of spirits such as pubs and wine merchants could only obtain limited supplies known as their quota. Such retailers tended to restrict sales to regular or favoured customers.
Retailers or consumers with pre-war stocks were in a most favourable position.
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A proper intercity train has a minimum of 8 coaches, gangwayed throughout, with first at one end, and a full sized buffet car between first and standard.
It has space for cycles, surfboards,luggage etc.
A 5 car DMU (Diesel Multiple Unit) is not a proper inter-city train. The 5+5 and 9 car DMUs are almost as bad.
eightonedee
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« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2020, 10:22:53 pm »

...or you could see if Private Walker might be able to help, at a price...
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bradshaw
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« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2020, 10:34:14 pm »

Beer was rationed from 1939 to the standard barrelage to the year ending September 1939. A standard barrel was defined as having an original gravity of 1055, around 5.5%. Realising, as they also did in WWI, that people wanted beer, the brewers simply reduced the gravity of their beers, diluting them down to 3 to 4%, or 1030 to 1040. This allowed them to brew a larger volume of weaker beer.
There were further restrictions on the use of sugar and some brewers played around with malt substitutes
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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2020, 11:50:57 pm »

Regarding the sale of alcahol, this is from the government website.

• Off-licences and licenced shops selling alcohol, including those within breweries

So thats allright then. I imagine going suddenly without smoking or drinking, when accostmed to doing so could be detramental to health.

Beyond following the Government's advice on social distancing and hand-washing, the best thing any smoker can do right now to protect themselves is to quit. Not easy if you're feeling cooped up and testy though!
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Things take longer to happen than you think they will, and then they happen faster than you thought they could.
Robin Summerhill
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« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2020, 12:05:38 am »

There might be an interesting historical side shoot here.

If we go back before piped “Council” water was in general use (and in truth that is only pre-1930 or thereabouts, especially for rural areas), beer was safer to drink than water. Water came from streams and wells, and no-one was ever quite sure what was in it.

If we go back say 200 years, which I know from my recent genealogical research that our great3 grandparents were alive back then (add a “great” to that if you’re under 40  Grin ), everybody drank beer – even for their breakfast (does anybody else remember the ad with Peter Cook advertising Witney’s Brown!?). It was a quite weak brew but still safer than the water that was then available.

Perhaps old habits die hard, and even by the outbreak of WW2 there may have been some people who still relied on the “old ways?”

I accept that its an old comedy sketch from 1969, but the first minute or so perhaps encapsulates how things were back then  Wink
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hb7x4Y-7pOQ
« Last Edit: April 11, 2020, 01:01:28 am by Robin Summerhill » Logged
bradshaw
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« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2020, 08:15:17 am »

There was ‘small beer’ at about 3% that everyone, including children, drank back then, because the water having been boiled was safe to drink. The standard beers of 200+ years ago ran at around 10%! They were winter brewed and placed in huge vats to mature for a year. Brewing used to cease in the summer months as contamination from the rudimentary coolers was too great. It restarted in October.
In Bridport, brewing all year round was in place by 1825 but was for the lighter beers not the stock, vatted ones.
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TonyK
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« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2020, 11:13:41 am »


There are far too many people trying to over-interpret the rules whilst perhaps losing sight of what the rules are for in the first place.

I agree. These include Northamptonshire and Derbyshire constabularies, and my wife. The latter scares me more than the whole of the combined resources of the former. However, these are challenging times. Political spin doesn't work, and even President Trump will realise (eventually) that you can't hide a death toll with a few angry tweets. I am a bird in a gilded cage at the moment, feeling more that fit enough to brave the rigours of the outside world, but knowing that some of the people who have died of this illness are young and healthy, neither of which boxes I can tick with honesty. If someone decides to take their constitutional in a park or on a beach rather than their living room, I say let them so long as they follow the contact rules, but I don't want them round at mine, thank you. If they choose to deny the risk and flout the regulations, then a plague on their houses, I say, but they are increasing the risk to all of us, not least the health and public service workers who are already paying a heavy price.

With my wife's support and threats of retribution in forms that include The Ultimate Sanction, I am following the letter of the recommendations as well as the spirit. I look forward to a resumption of what passes for normal life, and I want to still be around to enjoy it.
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Robin Summerhill
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« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2020, 04:00:17 pm »

Political spin doesn't work, and even President Trump will realise (eventually) that you can't hide a death toll with a few angry tweets.

I doubt it. If calling it a hoax doesn't succeed, or misleading the American public doesn't succeed, he'll just lie about it so often that people believe him anyway. Some of our politicians use the same trick (no names mentioned but I know who I'm thinking of...)

Quote from: TonyK
I am a bird in a gilded cage at the moment, feeling more that fit enough to brave the rigours of the outside world, but knowing that some of the people who have died of this illness are young and healthy, neither of which boxes I can tick with honesty.

I don't tick those boxes either!

Quote from: TonyK
If someone decides to take their constitutional in a park or on a beach rather than their living room, I say let them so long as they follow the contact rules, but I don't want them round at mine, thank you.

Hopefully no non-family member will be coming round to yours anyway, whether or not they are obeying the rules! But we have to remember that all people's circumstances are different.

I don't know about you, but the term I believe they use for people like me is an "empty nester." I still live in the same house that I bought in 1987 when my 4 sons were between 3 amd 14. Needless to say I have plenty of room and a garden back and front, and open countryside that I can walk in not ten minutes stroll away, and I'll only pass 3 other houses on the way there. Others are not so fortunate.

Having spent a lot of my working life clambering over council houses and flats to see what was wrong with them, I am well aware that many of the less fortunate do not have such luxury. Imagine if you were a family of five on the 18th floor of a tower block in a 2-bed flat, with next door's front door perhaps 3 feet away from your front door. There are other peoplr going up and down in the lift or in the stairwell all the time. You can't escape them. The kids, being kids, are bored out of their tiny minds, falling out with each other, having fights, creating general bedlam and driving you and the wife up the wall. Meanwhile, somebody else in the block  likes his rap music so much he's turned the volume up to maximum and the only saving grace is that at least it drowns out some of the squawking from the kids. I think in that position many of us would be running to the park, or rather we would be if the council hadn't locked it up "for the duration."

Quote from: TonyK
I am following the letter of the recommendations as well as the spirit. I look forward to a resumption of what passes for normal life, and I want to still be around to enjoy it.

Don' we all. But as you will see from my example, things aren't always black and white. There is a hell of a lot of grey too.
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broadgage
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« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2020, 05:08:21 pm »

Elsewhere, I stated that conditions are unduly onerous for families confined to small homes without gardens, and I publicly proposed the following very slight relaxation.

"Any person may visit public open spaces for rest, relaxation, or exercise, without limit on the number of such visits or the duration thereof. Subject to the following conditions.

1) Social distancing of at least 2 meters to be maintained, except between members of the same household.
2) Travel to and from the public open space must be on foot, by cycle or by other human powered transport. Use of motor vehicles or public transport is prohibited for visits to public open spaces.
3) Any pre-existing rules, regulations or byelaws applicable to the public open space remain unaltered.

Please limit the number of trips that you make, so far as is reasonable, perhaps by combining trips to public open spaces with other permitted reasons to leave you home."

Guidance notes and clarifications for pedants, police officers, and lawyers.
Public open spaces includes private property to which the public are admitted by permission. Examples include National Trust parks and gardens.
Public open spaces include beaches, foreshores and similar spaces to which the public customarily have access.
Public open spaces includes small structures therein such as bandstands or weather shelters, 2 m social separation applies within any such.
Public open spaces do not include buildings such as railway stations to which the public customarily have access.
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A proper intercity train has a minimum of 8 coaches, gangwayed throughout, with first at one end, and a full sized buffet car between first and standard.
It has space for cycles, surfboards,luggage etc.
A 5 car DMU (Diesel Multiple Unit) is not a proper inter-city train. The 5+5 and 9 car DMUs are almost as bad.
eXPassenger
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« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2020, 06:04:26 pm »

There might be an interesting historical side shoot here.

If we go back before piped “Council” water was in general use (and in truth that is only pre-1930 or thereabouts, especially for rural areas), beer was safer to drink than water. Water came from streams and wells, and no-one was ever quite sure what was in it.

If we go back say 200 years, which I know from my recent genealogical research that our great3 grandparents were alive back then (add a “great” to that if you’re under 40  Grin ), everybody drank beer – even for their breakfast (does anybody else remember the ad with Peter Cook advertising Witney’s Brown!?). It was a quite weak brew but still safer than the water that was then available.

Perhaps old habits die hard, and even by the outbreak of WW2 there may have been some people who still relied on the “old ways?”

I accept that its an old comedy sketch from 1969, but the first minute or so perhaps encapsulates how things were back then  Wink
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hb7x4Y-7pOQ


I grew up with spring water in the 50s (S Somerset), we moved to another house (W Dorset) in 1963 and mains water had only just arrived.
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Sixty3Closure
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« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2020, 08:27:48 pm »

Still on spring water here in West wales although I have UV filters, filtration units and a whole shed dedicated to the water supply.
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TonyK
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« Reply #27 on: April 11, 2020, 08:32:15 pm »

Beer was rationed from 1939 to the standard barrelage to the year ending September 1939. A standard barrel was defined as having an original gravity of 1055, around 5.5%. Realising, as they also did in WWI, that people wanted beer, the brewers simply reduced the gravity of their beers, diluting them down to 3 to 4%, or 1030 to 1040. This allowed them to brew a larger volume of weaker beer.
There were further restrictions on the use of sugar and some brewers played around with malt substitutes

I knew that the war was pretty tough, but I had no idea that it was so bad. My goodness!
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Now, please!
TonyK
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« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2020, 08:35:35 pm »

Beyond following the Government's advice on social distancing and hand-washing, the best thing any smoker can do right now to protect themselves is to quit. Not easy if you're feeling cooped up and testy though!

That is unarguably true, on both counts! You will always have some damage, but it stops getting worse, and most of it goes away, straight after you stub the last smoke out.

If I could explain how I did, overnight with no support or aids of any kind after an addiction of over 20 years, I would be a very wealthy man.
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Now, please!
Western Pathfinder
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« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2020, 11:09:52 pm »

Beer was rationed from 1939 to the standard barrelage to the year ending September 1939. A standard barrel was defined as having an original gravity of 1055, around 5.5%. Realising, as they also did in WWI, that people wanted beer, the brewers simply reduced the gravity of their beers, diluting them down to 3 to 4%, or 1030 to 1040. This allowed them to brew a larger volume of weaker beer.
There were further restrictions on the use of sugar and some brewers played around with malt substitutes

I knew that the war was pretty tough, but I had no idea that it was so bad. My goodness!

My Guinness!..
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