Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum
GWR advice (Project Phoenix)
Forum in and beyond Coronavirus
Great Western Coffee Shop
[home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here].
Register [here] - it's free.
What do I gain from registering? [here]
 today - Tuesday Club - ONLINE
tomorrow - Comm. Rail & Recovery ONLINE
tomorrow - ConnectedCities, WECA ONLINE
24/08/20 - Challenge of Decarb. - ONLINE
Random Image
Train Running Polls Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail news GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4
Next departures • Bristol Temple MeadsBath SpaChippenhamSwindonDidcot ParkwayReadingLondon PaddingtonMelksham
Exeter St DavidsTauntonWestburyTrowbridgeBristol ParkwayCardiff CentralOxfordCheltenham SpaBirmingham New Street
August 11, 2020, 02:40:33 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[92] It would be a tragedy if coronavirus costs us the joys of trai...
[86] Reading Green Park
[70] Climate protests in London
[66] Gloucester to Swindon 1964 timetable
[50] Community Rail Network Awards, 2020
[49] Metrowest Status
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Brighton [Dotd 7.5.20]  (Read 1595 times)
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 30192



View Profile WWW Email
« on: May 07, 2020, 04:48:02 am »

Brighton - at the extreme end of GWR train services - has a rich transport history ...

Brighton Belle - https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6751089/Brighton-Belle-train-restored-glory-6m-revamp-wider-seats-todays-passengers.html
Brighton Electric Railway - http://www.urban75.org/railway/volks-electric-railway.html
Brighton Piers - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brighton_Palace_Pier
Brighton Speed Trials - https://www.veterancarrun.com
Brighton Station - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brighton_railway_station
Brighton Trams - https://www.brightontoymuseum.co.uk/index/Category:Brighton_trams
Brighton to Rottingdean Seashore Electric railway - http://www.urban75.org/railway/brighton-sea-railway.html
Devil's Dyke Arial Cabelway - https://fulking.net/the-aerial-cableway-1894-1909/
Devil's Dyke Branch - http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/d/dyke/ and http://devils-dyke-railway.yolasite.com/the-route-of-the-dyke-railway.php and https://fulking.net/the-dyke-railway-1887-1938/
Devil's Dyke Old Tram - http://www.urban75.org/railway/devils-dyke.html and https://fulking.net/the-steep-grade-railway-1897-1909/
Kemp Town Branch - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemp_Town_railway_station
London to Brighton Veteran Car Run - https://www.veterancarrun.com
Trolley buses - https://www.mybrightonandhove.org.uk/category/topics/topictrans/trams-and-trolley-buses

Some old pictures (all prior to 1912!)








Logged

Coffee Shop Admin, Vice Chair of Melksham Rail User Group, and on the board of TravelWatch SouthWest.
infoman
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 383


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2020, 05:05:01 am »

Nice pictures Grahame,I got the fourth one but where are the first three?
Logged
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 30192



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2020, 05:46:17 am »

Nice pictures Grahame,I got the fourth one but where are the first three?

? - I could read that question several ways

1. All four should appear on your browser; some will come up larger if you "view image in new frame"

2. All sourced from within the links at the top of the article and out of copyright due to age (but that is complex!)

3. The images are as follows:
i. Devil's Dyke Station, 1911
ii. The old tram (sort of cliff lift) at Devil's Dyke - closed 1909, removed 1913
iii. Volks electric railway (foreground, opened 1883), Chain Pier (destroyed 1896) in background
iv. Sea Railway which ran from 1896 to 1901
Logged

Coffee Shop Admin, Vice Chair of Melksham Rail User Group, and on the board of TravelWatch SouthWest.
bradshaw
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 875



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2020, 09:14:57 am »

The NLS map of 1914 shows the aerial flight and incline, the route of the latter can still be traced and also seen on Google Earth.
That of 1895 also shows a switchback railway and “bicycle railway” by the hotel
Logged
SandTEngineer
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3484


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2020, 09:37:29 am »

Grahame. Think you might have missed one in your list. Devils Dyke Switchback Railway: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/saddlescombe-farm-and-newtimber-hill/features/history-devils-dyke-victorian-funfair# and in this historic film clip here: https://youtu.be/SWAwnWYJ3YM
Logged
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 30192



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2020, 10:27:15 am »

Grahame. Think you might have missed one in your list. Devils Dyke Switchback Railway: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/saddlescombe-farm-and-newtimber-hill/features/history-devils-dyke-victorian-funfair# and in this historic film clip here: https://youtu.be/SWAwnWYJ3YM

Oh goodness - now that one is really obscured in history!



And the "bicycle railway" is even more hard to trace - what look like  couple of frames in that old video, little more

From http://poynings.net/poynings/dyke-railway

Quote
In September 1887 a spur was taken off of the main Brighton to Portsmouth railway line at Aldrington to provide a route to the Dyke. This was no mean feat as the line would need to climb a gradient of 1 in 40 and in order to make the line as level as possible it ran in a series of 20-40 foot deep cuttings and on 40 foot high embankments. The total journey time was around 20 minutes and cost 1/6d for a First Class return.

The first building at the Dyke was a disused bathing machine put there in 1818. In 1831 a Hotel was erected and this was improved in 1835. Amusements were provided at the Dyke: everything from a zoo, funfair, switchback, bicycle railway and a fortune teller to a 7 ton replica Naval gun. Among the attractions were an Aerial Railway which spanned the Dyke Gorge and a Funicular Railway which ran down the north side of the Dyke to Poynings. Some evidence of these two attractions still remain for the observant to find.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 10:34:03 am by grahame » Logged

Coffee Shop Admin, Vice Chair of Melksham Rail User Group, and on the board of TravelWatch SouthWest.
infoman
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 383


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2020, 10:56:41 am »

Thank you.
Logged
bradshaw
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 875



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2020, 02:46:32 pm »

Have just found a photo of the upper level of the funicular railway at Devils Dyke, taken on a visit some years ago. It shows the base 'station'
The second shows the Devil's Dyke itself, across which the aerial flight was constructed
Logged
Surrey 455
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 909


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2020, 01:14:47 am »

Have just found a photo of the upper level of the funicular railway at Devils Dyke, taken on a visit some years ago. It shows the base 'station'
The second shows the Devil's Dyke itself, across which the aerial flight was constructed

It's a great location for a walk. I did it 3 years ago starting from Ditchling Beacon. The views from the top of both are tremendous, and walking on the valley floor is a great feeling. During the walk I also took a look at the Jack and Jill windmills.
Logged
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 30192



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2020, 10:31:39 pm »

Brighton to Rottingdean Seashore Electric railway - http://www.urban75.org/railway/brighton-sea-railway.html

A fascinating further article ...  from the Railway Museum

https://blog.railwaymuseum.org.uk/daddy-long-legs-a-weird-and-wonderful-railway/

Quote
Photographic Archives Volunteer Nick sheds some light on an unusual discovery.

One of the most unusual photographic collections in the National Railway Museum’s archives which I’ve come across as a volunteer cataloguer is one by Ellis Kelsey, an amateur photographer who lived in Eastbourne, Sussex, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His work was regularly exhibited at the Royal Photographic Society (RPS) exhibitions in London between 1899 and 1914.
Logged

Coffee Shop Admin, Vice Chair of Melksham Rail User Group, and on the board of TravelWatch SouthWest.
bradshaw
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 875



View Profile
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2020, 09:34:51 am »

You can still see the line of the rails at low tide, marked bu the ‘sleepers’. They can be seen from the road from Rottingdean as you approach Brighton.
Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants

Jump to top of pageJump to Forum Home Page