Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum [home] and [about]
from GWR - Travel with confidence
Forum in and beyond Coronavirus
DfT Covid Travel Advice
Read about the forum [here].
Register [here] - it's free.
What do I gain from registering? [here]
 today - Railfuture Severnside - CANX
29/09/20 - Tuesday Club - ONLINE
03/10/20 - RailFuture Annual - ONLINE
09/10/20 - Travelwach Southwest
Random Image
Train Running Polls Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail news GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4
Next departures • Bristol Temple MeadsBath SpaChippenhamSwindonDidcot ParkwayReadingLondon PaddingtonMelksham
Exeter St DavidsTauntonWestburyTrowbridgeBristol ParkwayCardiff CentralOxfordCheltenham SpaBirmingham New Street
September 26, 2020, 07:12:55 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[124] AZTEC Tickets - sorting out the ticket barriers
[109] Newhaven Marine. Closure consultation, January 2020.
[89] Journeys between places with similar names
[52] lack of rail scenes in modern day films
[49] Weymouth tramway-the final curtain?
[47] Older types of fluorescent lamp now hard to find.
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Where was Bmblbzz buzzing around on Sunday?  (Read 544 times)
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2996


View Profile
« on: August 04, 2020, 02:51:11 pm »


I was bumbling around on my lean green machine when I found this not so lean, equally green, mean machine (note that neither could be described as clean Shocked).
Site identification should be easy but I'd be interested to know precisely what its function was and how long for?
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
Red Squirrel
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3823


There are some who call me... Tim


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2020, 04:05:48 pm »

Is that a Shimano Biopace chainwheel..?
Logged
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2996


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2020, 04:41:48 pm »

It's not even Shimano, let alone Biopace. Nor is it any other version of elliptical chainwheel.
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
martyjon
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1941


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2020, 04:55:19 pm »


I was bumbling around on my lean green machine when I found this not so lean, equally green, mean machine (note that neither could be described as clean Shocked).
Site identification should be easy but I'd be interested to know precisely what its function was and how long for?



It is a fireless steam engine used to shunt the coal wagons around the generating site, recharged by the copious amounts available of steam at site but where foto taken I haven't the foggiest.
Logged
Western Pathfinder
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1259



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2020, 05:23:59 pm »

At a guess Sharpness ish ?..
Logged
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2996


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2020, 05:24:16 pm »

That's interesting in itself. And fits with the location, I'd say.
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2996


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2020, 05:25:15 pm »

At a guess Sharpness ish ?..
Not just ish, it is Sharpness docks.  Smiley
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
stuving
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4969


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2020, 06:11:07 pm »

It is a fireless steam engine used to shunt the coal wagons around the generating site, recharged by the copious amounts available of steam at site but where foto taken I haven't the foggiest.

And long before hydrogen fuel cells it could boast, greenly, "nothing but water out of the exhaust".
Logged
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2996


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2020, 07:10:34 pm »

I had presumed it had been used at Berkeley nuclear power station, which is nearby, for shunting uranium flasks. Could it actually have been used at the docks for unloading/loading coal? But then why would it belong to CEGB? I'm not aware of any other power stations, current or former, around there. But then avoiding fire in the general vicinity of a reactor also seems a good idea, and there would certainly have been plenty of steam.
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
bradshaw
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 902



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2020, 09:40:18 pm »


There is a photo in this site; scroll down the page
https://rogerfarnworth.com/2020/06/11/gloucester-docks-and-railways-part-3-over-junction-the-llanthony-branch-and-railways-to-the-west-side-of-the-docks/
Logged
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2996


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2020, 11:10:12 pm »

Thank you, that's interesting. Lots of new stuff (to me) in that link. I've noticed the remains of the docks line on Alney Island but had no idea there had been a power station there. There is still a sub-station but maybe that's coincidental. Slightly disappointed to find this engine – assuming it's the same one – was not in fact a "nuclear powered steam engine" but nevertheless good to have details! Smiley
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
grahame
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 30660



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2020, 12:51:41 am »

Fireless locomotives are not as unusual as some might think - there was at least one on the Sittingbourne and Kemsely - I remember seeing it there in the early days of that in preservation (and it was surely preservation majoring on heritage in those days) though out of use, and there's one at Shildon too.  Anywhere that sparks from a fire would have been a danger, such as a paper mill with lots of inflammable dust around. 

The steam equivalent of the battery locomotive or bemu?  But there's another story.
Logged

Coffee Shop Admin, Vice Chair of Melksham Rail User Group, and on the board of TravelWatch SouthWest.
chuffed
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1365


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2020, 07:07:03 am »

They could have done with one of these in Beirut yesterday.

Coinicides almost to the day to the 30th anniversary of the hottest day on record 38C in Cheltenham on Aug 3rd in 1990. That record was broken last year with 38.7 in Cambridge.

It was also the day when the Albright and Wilson liquid white  phosphorus plant in Portishead went up, caused by incorrect and careless  storage of an inflammable substance. The cloud of toxic gas and smoke was blown south westwards and despite only living a mile and a half away, I knew nothing about it,as my view of the cloud was obscured by the hill.

Totally oblivious, I turned on the telly to see people wearing face masks in Exeter!

I found this report on the event, in the Liverpool Echo no less !

 In August 1990 one of the most spectacular health and safety failures occurred when many drums of white phosphorus went up in smoke, and certainly put Portishead on the map.

It was reported afterwards that the warehouse contained more than 30 tonnes of P4 in 166 drums, each holding 200kg. The explanation into the cause was that overnight one of the drums had caught fire spreading to the others. Over 100 firemen brought the blaze under control and it was clear that toxic white phosphorus vapour and breakdown products were given off over a 15 mile area, just as they would at Oldbury some 19 years later. It apparently also set off smoke detectors in guest houses in Weston Super Mare- perhaps a throwback to one of the dismissed claims against the new factory made many years earlier.

Unfortunately as they always did, Albright and Wilson were quick to try to downplay this incident, blaming the hot weather and putting some form of “Dunkirk spirit” in the fantastical b******* written in Albright World. They claimed that 167 drums were damaged or destroyed out of 366 held. A sandbag lake was created to attempt to contain the obvious major pollution, though what effect this had is unclear. The dock lowered by 30 inches due to the volume of water being used to fight the fire- but where did all of this heavily contaminated phossy water go back to?

Struck (no pun intended) by the parallels with what we were lucky to avoid in Portishead, and an early use of face masks !
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 10:16:32 am by chuffed » Logged
CyclingSid
Data Manager
Hero Member
******
Posts: 997


Hockley viaduct


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2020, 07:17:35 am »

For obvious reasons they also tended to prefer fireless locomotives at Ordnance Factories.

On Beirut, there seems to be some lack of clarity as to how much Ammonium Nitrate there was, hundreds or thousands of tons? Fortunately more than was ever got together in Northern Ireland, where it was known as ANFO/
Logged
Oxonhutch
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 846



View Profile
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2020, 08:42:33 am »

Ammonium nitrate and diesel mixed together near the work site formed the most common explosive (Amflex) used on the South African gold mines. I can attest that the former is very comfortable to sit on when descending in a huge bucket down a newly sinking mine shaft.

You could always tell which of the houses on the mine estate was inhabited by a blasting ticket miner - his house would have the greenest lawn!
Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants

Jump to top of pageJump to Forum Home Page