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Author Topic: Overspeeding incident at Dauntsey, Wiltshire - 12.08.2020  (Read 611 times)
grahame
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« on: November 11, 2020, 09:25:31 am »

From the RAIB (Rail Accident Investigation Branch)

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Overspeeding incident at Dauntsey, Wiltshire

Preliminary examination into an overspeeding incident near Dauntsey, Wiltshire on 12 August 2020.

At about 16:07 hrs on Wednesday 12 August, a Great Western Railway (GWR) service from London to Bristol travelled at around 117 mph (188 km/h) over an emergency speed restriction (ESR) of 20 mph (32 km/h), near Dauntsey, Wiltshire. This incident did not result in any damage or injury.

snip

Quote
This incident is an example of circumstances in which a warning of an ESR ahead would be valuable. The driver was misled by the way the lineside information was presented, which did not sufficiently highlight that the existing ESR had been modified such that passenger trains were now affected. The 30/125 ESR had been allowed to remain in place for some time without being converted to a Temporary Speed Restriction (TSR), which would have changed the information presented to the driver on this occasion and made it more likely that he would have responded to a newly-imposed ESR arising from the hot weather.

We have written to Network Rail and RSSB, copied to the Office Rail and Road, to alert them to this event and the circumstances surrounding the application of the speed restriction. We have also brought the need for action to implement the previous relevant recommendations to their attention.
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eXPassenger
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« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2020, 04:50:35 pm »

There was also a comment that the driver did not know the passenger train restriction had been applied that afternoon because NR had not told GWR.
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onthecushions
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2020, 08:59:52 pm »


A case for approach control?

OTC
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stuving
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« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2020, 10:06:06 pm »


A case for approach control?

OTC

Would that be emergency approach control? Or just temporary?

Network Rail need to have a thorough think about their hierarchy of speed restrictions - TSR, ESR, and transient ones like this (in force for five hours) - and about how their use of bits of paper to inform drivers interacts with other information systems.
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onthecushions
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2020, 10:43:25 pm »


If it were embedded in software, as rules can be, it would be automatic, whatever its category.

Remember those flickering oil lamps!

OTC
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stuving
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2020, 10:58:23 pm »


If it were embedded in software, as rules can be, it would be automatic, whatever its category.

Remember those flickering oil lamps!

OTC

And the estimated time for doing that is? Not before next heatwave, I think, which is what RAIB will expect.
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grahame
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« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2020, 05:51:32 am »

There was also a comment that the driver did not know the passenger train restriction had been applied that afternoon because NR had not told GWR.

To emphasise that - from the BBC

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The RAIB said a 30mph (48km/h) was imposed on freight trains only on the main line at Dauntsey on 27 June.

On the day of the incident, it was reduced to 20mph (32km/h) for both freight and passenger trains.

But the report stated the driver of the Great Western Railway (GWR) service from London to Bristol had "no means of knowing" it had been changed earlier that afternoon because Network Rail had not informed GWR.
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onthecushions
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« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2020, 11:29:27 am »


And the estimated time for doing that is? Not before next heatwave, I think, which is what RAIB will expect.


Back to "bits of paper" then.

OTC
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« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2020, 11:50:17 am »

Back to "bits of paper" then.

Getting my investigators hat on, I would be interested to know whether the driver would have assumed the 125mph board had become displaced had the area not been fitted with ATP.  With ATP chips not being altered it could have given the driver an extra reason to believe that the sign had been displaced rather than in an area of no ATP where the driver would only have seen the signs and not expected any other warnings.  It can be assumed the driver was unsure having made an initial brake application, before deciding (unwisely, it has to be said) to make assumptions of a displaced sign.

For me, the ATP should match the lineside signage, and if it doesn't trains should continue to be verbally cautioned.  I'm not sure "bits of paper" would be the answer as that information can also be misinterpreted or changed during a shift.
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2020, 01:09:11 pm »

https://www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/18866181.gwr-train-driver-almost-100mph-track-speed-limit-wiltshire

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A TRAIN driver sped through a 20mph zone at almost 100mph over the limit.

A report by the Rail Accident Investigation Branch revealed the London to Bristol Great Western Railway train was travelling at 117mph near Dauntsey, Wiltshire, on August 12.

Hot weather and a track defect meant the speed limit had been cut from the national standard of 125mph to 20mph at the time.

The report said that, as Network Rail had not informed GWR, the driver was not aware and assumed the speed limit side had fallen off the side of the track.
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2020, 08:49:26 am »

This incident has hit the press!
https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/the-driver-misled-passenger-train-4693975
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TonyN
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« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2020, 04:41:39 pm »

Amazing I never knew Electrostars could run at 125mph or that the third rail had been extended to Dauntsey.
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« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2020, 12:25:31 am »

Amazing I never knew Electrostars could run at 125mph or that the third rail had been extended to Dauntsey.

If it was a London to Bristol service it was obviously an IET, unless you know more about this than the press do?
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TonyK
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« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2020, 12:40:57 am »

Amazing I never knew Electrostars could run at 125mph or that the third rail had been extended to Dauntsey.

It seems the Post will always go out of its way to make sure that in railway stories, the picture will bear no relation to what was actually involved. The Post is not alone in this. A story in another similar paper about a two-car train breaking down because of a blocked diesel filter will undoubtedly be illustrated with a photo of a Pendolino at full tilt, unless it happened on the WCML.
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