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Author Topic: The Duke of Edinburgh - statement from GWR  (Read 4837 times)
bobm
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« on: April 09, 2021, 01:16:57 pm »

HRH Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh

On behalf of everyone at GWR (Great Western Railway) we would like to express our deepest sympathy to Her Majesty, The Queen and the entire Royal Family at this sad time.

The Royal Family have always had close ties with train travel, a tradition and service we at GWR are proud to have provided for many, many years.

As there will be no public ceremony at this difficult time due to the current situation, we would remind everyone not to travel unless your journey is absolutely essential. There will be no events taking place at any of the Royal palaces in London or at Windsor Castle and we would ask people not to travel to these destinations.

We are sure there will be time for those who wish to reflect privately on his life and service to the country over the coming days.
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broadgage
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2021, 04:10:13 pm »

Hopefully some suitable public event can be arranged once times are normal again ?
And some lasting memorial arranged, not just another statue but something useful and of lasting service to one of the many good causes that the late Duke of Edinburgh supported.

Perhaps buildings or land or some form of ongoing funding for the "Duke of Edinburg award scheme"

Presumably, flags should be flown at half mast.
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A proper intercity train has a minimum of 8 coaches, gangwayed throughout, with first at one end, and a full sized buffet car between first and standard.
It has space for cycles, surfboards,luggage etc.
A 5 car DMU (Diesel Multiple Unit) is not a proper inter-city train. The 5+5 and 9 car DMUs are almost as bad.
bobm
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2021, 04:28:05 pm »

From the College of Arms

Quote
All official flags, including the Union Flag, will be flown at half-mast from now until 08:00 on the day following the funeral. Flags may be flown overnight during this period but should remain at half-mast. Official flags in this instance are defined as Union Flags, the national flags of the home nations, ensigns and ships’ colours.

Any non-official flags flying or due to be flown should be taken down and replaced with a Union Flag flying at half-mast. Official flags scheduled to be flown should be flown as planned but at half-mast.

Flags will be flown at half-mast during this period, including on days which would otherwise be flag-flying days. The only exception is when The Queen is present within a building or its precincts, at which time the Royal Standard will be flown at full mast.

The flag flown should be clean and in a state of good repair. When flags are flown at half-mast they should first be raised to the top of the flagpole, and then lowered to a point two-thirds of the way up, with at least the height of the flag between the top of the flag and the top of the flagpole. When lowering a flag, it should first be raised to the top and then lowered to the ground. Flagpoles which are more than 45 degrees from the vertical should fly no flag as half-masting is not possible.

The flying of flags on buildings of Her Majesty’s Government is determined by the Lord Chamberlain’s Office and administered by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), subject to the instructions of the Prime Minister, and the advice and guidance of Garter King of Arms.

This protocol will apply to Flag Stations (establishments listed in the Queen’s Regulations for the Army), naval and RAF (Royal Air Force) establishments, at home and abroad; all British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates; and on all buildings of Her Majesty’s Government, Parliament, agencies and devolved administrations throughout the United Kingdom.

Devolved administrations in Scotland and Wales will issue instructions for the flying of the Union Flag and others official flags on buildings in their estate and others as necessary. In Northern Ireland, the Northern Ireland Office will issue instructions for buildings covered by the Flags Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2000.

The Governments of the Commonwealth Realms, British Overseas Territories and Dependencies will be following the same flag protocol as set out above.

The instructions above are not binding on local authorities, public institutions, or others. They will need to take their own decisions as to flag-flying; but the above protocol may be useful for guidance.

The flying of flags in general is subject to planning laws, which state that flags may not be flown without planning consent, unless they fall into certain categories. For details of these categories please see http://www.college-of-arms.gov.uk/resources/union-flag-faqs. It also comes under the general oversight and authority of the Earl Marshal, in England, Wales and Northern Ireland; and Lord Lyon King of Arms, in Scotland.

 
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TonyK
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2021, 08:20:37 pm »


Perhaps buildings or land or some form of ongoing funding for the "Duke of Edinburgh award scheme"


That would be the most appropriate legacy. I didn't have anything to do with the scheme, but know people who have, and all benefitted. The same is true of the Prince's Trust, the effect of which I have seen closer to home. A new patron would be needed to keep the scheme rolling, but I can't think of the most likely candidate.
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PhilWakely
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« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2021, 08:24:24 pm »


Perhaps buildings or land or some form of ongoing funding for the "Duke of Edinburgh award scheme"


That would be the most appropriate legacy. I didn't have anything to do with the scheme, but know people who have, and all benefitted. The same is true of the Prince's Trust, the effect of which I have seen closer to home. A new patron would be needed to keep the scheme rolling, but I can't think of the most likely candidate.

If you are referring to a new patron for the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme, then Prince Edward has been in that role for a while. Not sure about the Prince's Trust.
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TaplowGreen
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2021, 09:54:29 pm »


Perhaps buildings or land or some form of ongoing funding for the "Duke of Edinburgh award scheme"


That would be the most appropriate legacy. I didn't have anything to do with the scheme, but know people who have, and all benefitted. The same is true of the Prince's Trust, the effect of which I have seen closer to home. A new patron would be needed to keep the scheme rolling, but I can't think of the most likely candidate.

If you are referring to a new patron for the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme, then Prince Edward has been in that role for a while. Not sure about the Prince's Trust.

Prince's Trust is a Prince Charles enterprise I thought?
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JayMac
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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2021, 10:20:00 pm »

The Prince's Trust is indeed Charles' thing. He's its founder and president.

I was an adult (over aged 26) Prince's Trust volunteer, then a voluntary Assistant Team Leader for a couple of years around the turn of the millennium. It kept me on the straight and narrow for a bit during a turbulent time in my life and I learnt plenty. Particularly to not be dismissive of young people who have strayed off the path, have had troubled upbringings, or have under achieved academically. I had an excellent Team Leader, a Northern Ireland and Falklands veteran former Royal Marine Commando. Short, quiet, gentle fella, but hard as nails!

The Prince's Trust is very different in focus to the Duke of Edinburgh's Award. There's no cost to become a Prince's Trust Volunteer and the scheme is primarily for the young unemployed. I, as an adult volunteer, then voluntary Assistant Team Leader, was funded by the European Social Fund. Youth volunteers were funded by the Trust and its partners, with courses such as Food Hygiene, First Aid and a week long residential trip all covered. Even things like appropriate clothing could be provided at no cost. Volunteers on the 12 week course are also excused from state benefit requirements such as 'signing on' and actively seeking work. Said benefits are also unaffected by participation. The DofE Awards on the other hand have some not inconsiderable costs to participants - a barrier to young unemployed and those from poorer households. I always regarded the DofE Awards as a bit more middle class. That not to say that the DofE Awards are any less noble in aim.

I do have some regret that I didn't stay on with The Prince's Trust and train to become a Team Leader. Life, and straying back off the path, got in the way. Some positives from that time though. It looks good on a CV, some useful life skills were learned, and I met the mother of my daughter through the Prince's Trust. Oh, and I got to abseil (twice) off Bickleigh Viaduct on the former South Devon and Tavistock Railway. A real highlight.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2021, 10:29:52 pm by bignosemac » Logged

bobm
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« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2021, 02:46:27 am »


Perhaps buildings or land or some form of ongoing funding for the "Duke of Edinburgh award scheme"


That would be the most appropriate legacy. I didn't have anything to do with the scheme, but know people who have, and all benefitted. The same is true of the Prince's Trust, the effect of which I have seen closer to home. A new patron would be needed to keep the scheme rolling, but I can't think of the most likely candidate.

If you are referring to a new patron for the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme, then Prince Edward has been in that role for a while. Not sure about the Prince's Trust.

Indeed and, according to the Court Circular, Prince Edward attended a meeting of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme yesterday morning shortly before Prince Philip’s death was announced. 
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broadgage
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« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2021, 05:55:16 pm »

If anyone is considering leaving flowers or other items outside Windsor Castle or other Royal palaces, please think again.

So doing enriches florists, and adds to carbon emissions as most flowers are imported by air. Public money is then expended on removal and disposal. Under present conditions there are also concerns about travel to such places.

Far better in my view to donate money, to a charity that the late Duke would have supported. The Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme is the obvious choice, but alternatives include various charities related to conserving the natural world.
If for any reason you do not feel able to support the above, then a donation to your favoured charity is in my view preferable to adding to a mound of synthetic wrapped and air freighted flowers.
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A proper intercity train has a minimum of 8 coaches, gangwayed throughout, with first at one end, and a full sized buffet car between first and standard.
It has space for cycles, surfboards,luggage etc.
A 5 car DMU (Diesel Multiple Unit) is not a proper inter-city train. The 5+5 and 9 car DMUs are almost as bad.
grahame
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« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2021, 10:04:37 am »

If anyone is considering leaving flowers or other items outside Windsor Castle or other Royal palaces, please think again.

Agreed 100%.  Sad to see an image of a child leaving flowers being used to illustrate the request across the press. Not the best choice?  And from Indy 100

Quote
In keeping with the national mood, National Rail have decided to pay tribute to Prince Philip after his death.

The organisation thought it would be a good idea to honour the duke’s long life by ditching the colours on their website, instead turning it grey.

A nice idea, maybe? The jury’s still out on that. But, unfortunately, and more importantly, customers say they can no longer read the website – which is, let’s be honest, the only reason people visit the website.
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TonyK
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« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2021, 03:28:56 pm »

That would be the most appropriate legacy. I didn't have anything to do with the scheme, but know people who have, and all benefitted. The same is true of the Prince's Trust, the effect of which I have seen closer to home. A new patron would be needed to keep the scheme rolling, but I can't think of the most likely candidate.

If you are referring to a new patron for the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme, then Prince Edward has been in that role for a while. Not sure about the Prince's Trust.

Thank you - I should have done my homework. In rethe Princes Trust, I meant that people have benefitted, not that it was part of the Duke of Edinburgh DoE award. By coincidence, I returned someone's Princes Trust documents to them yesterday, after 20 years in out special Document Storage Facility, or plastic box.

Edit: VickiS - Clarifying abbreviation
« Last Edit: April 17, 2021, 07:23:59 pm by VickiS » Logged

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TaplowGreen
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« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2021, 10:36:06 am »

Rather embarrassing.

https://www.huffp.st/H78eNcY
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REVUpminster
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« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2021, 06:38:46 am »

I think Prince Edward becomes Duke of Edinburgh when Prince Charles becomes King.

I also think the most embarrassing moment is BBC» (British Broadcasting Corporation - home page) Royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell saying the men would be in civilian dress so as not to embarrass Prince Harry forgetting all about Prince Andrew who will be there; and also that Harry and William will be separated by older cousin Peter Phillips.

Trying to make news and not report news.
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JayMac
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« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2021, 02:22:42 am »

I've been catching up on the programming broadcast this week celebrating the life of the Duke of Edinburgh.

Nice to learn today of the connection to Prince Philip of Sir Kenneth Grange, designer of the iconic Inter-City 125 High Speed Train.

Sir Kenneth is a two time winner of the Prince Philip Designers prize. An award scheme instigated by the Duke of Edinburgh in 1959 to recognise excellence in post war design.

I also shared my thoughts of today's ceremony on social media. Immediate thoughts as I watched (on catch-up) coverage of the Duke's funeral.


Saturday night after 10.30pm usually means MoTD, or catching up on other sports highlights.

Tonight though I'm watching the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral coverage on BBC» (British Broadcasting Corporation - home page) iPlayer.

People who know me well, know I'm a republican and pacifist, with a centre-left political outlook. That doesn't mean though that I don't recognise the good in someone who has given a life time of public service in the name of a Constitutional Monarchy. It doesn't mean I don't recognise the importance of national identity and and those uniquely British ceremonial occasions heavy with military representation. You can't but admire the pomp of soldiers, sailors and airmen/women in full dress ceremonial uniforms marching to military bands, then parading under command.

I may not wave the flag for day to day monarchy but I recognise that the Royal Family are what defines Britishness. I respect them for their contribution to public duty, something they don't get to choose as a job. They do it, day in, day out for their whole adult life. No retirement clock at 65. They are not 'here today, gone tomorrow' politicians. They are constant. They put up with a lot of shit, living constantly under the microscope. They have no escape. And they can't bite back. I certainly couldn't cope with all that.

And finally, they are history. I love learning British history, and the history of monarchy in the United Kingdom. Admittedly, my favourite part of British History to learn about is the English Civil War and the brief period as a quasi-Republic that we had following the execution of King Charles I. But monarchy ultimately prevailed.

The majority of the British public support a constitutional monarchy. And, as a believer in democracy, I accept that.

RIP Your Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth, Baron Greenwich, Royal Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Extra Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Member of the Order of Merit, Grand Master and First and Principal Knight Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Knight of the Order of Australia, Additional Member of the Order of New Zealand, Extra Companion of the Queen’s Service Order, Royal Chief of the Order of Logohu, Extraordinary Companion of the Order of Canada, Extraordinary Commander of the Order of Military Merit, Lord of Her Majesty’s Most Honourable Privy Council, Privy Councillor of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada, Personal Aide-de-Camp to Her Majesty, Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom.

Thank you for your public service, Sir.
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TonyK
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« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2021, 10:45:26 am »

Well said. There were a couple of surprises in the music and readings, but I thought the Duke did a very good job of arranging his own send-off. I liked that he had commissioned the music for Psalm 104, and that the composer is alive and well. Reveille and Action Stations after the Last Post said "Right, now get on with it". My lasting memory, this, is of the Queen looking helpless for the first time in my life.

I watched Match of the Day. Well done for passing up on it to do your research.
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