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Author Topic: Great Western Main Line electrification - ongoing discussion  (Read 706528 times)
ZoŽ
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« Reply #540 on: March 01, 2011, 05:24:27 pm »

He also said "my successor", so no plans for considering replacement in the next few years.
Also note that he didn't confirm life extension.  This would be required of the HSTs were to remain in service from 2020.
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anthony215
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« Reply #541 on: March 01, 2011, 05:24:44 pm »

even a mp asking abouut electrifying the severn beach line
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Brucey
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« Reply #542 on: March 01, 2011, 05:24:55 pm »

Stephen Williams asked what we were all thinking: SVB line electrification!
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bignosemac
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« Reply #543 on: March 01, 2011, 05:25:26 pm »

Knitting to the 'Beach? Gets my vote!!!
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ZoŽ
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« Reply #544 on: March 01, 2011, 05:26:30 pm »

That's it, they are talking about BBC World Service now.
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anthony215
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« Reply #545 on: March 01, 2011, 05:29:57 pm »

wiring to Severn Beach, weston super mare & taunton if they do these streches of track then it will be a good idea, plus maybe new EMU's could be ordered on the back of the crossrail order if the electrification of those  bits of line  were  given the go ahead.

Nice to hear about the cardiff valley lines as well
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #546 on: March 01, 2011, 05:36:38 pm »

From the DfT press release:

Quote
Green light for new trains and rail electrification

Scotland, Wales, northern and south west England are to get a fleet of new trains and more reliable rail links to London, creating thousands of jobs, boosting the economy and improving services for passengers, Transport Secretary Philip Hammond announced today. He gave the go-ahead for the ^4.5bn Intercity Express Programme (IEP) and the ^704m plans to electrify the Great Western Main Line (GWML) between Cardiff, Bristol and Didcot.

The Government announced today it has decided to resume the IEP procurement and proceed with the Agility Trains (Hitachi and John Laing) consortium's plans for replacement for the nation's fleet of ageing intercity high speed trains. This will mean 500 new carriages which will provide 11,000 more peak-time seats for passengers, every day on the GWML and ECML

Hitachi had previously announced its intention to build a new train factory in County Durham to build the new order, creating more than 500 new jobs and securing thousands of additional jobs in sub-supplier industries in north east England, giving a further boost to Britain's manufacturing industry. This factory is expected to be operational by 2013.

The announcement to electrify the sections between Cardiff, Bristol and Didcot builds on November's announcement of electrification between London Paddington, Didcot, Newbury and Oxford, and will give Wales its very first main line electrified railway, cutting 17 minutes from Cardiff to London journeys and 22 minutes from Bristol to London journeys. Electric trains are not only quicker, but quieter, smoother and more reliable than diesels. They are also cleaner - producing no emissions at their point of use.

Philip Hammond said:

"This is good news for jobs, passengers and the economy. Our decision to buy a new fleet of trains and electrify new lines will allow rail passengers along the Great Western and East Coast corridors to benefit from massive improvements to journey times, more seats and more reliable services.

"Alongside our plans for High Speed Rail, it completes a picture of massive upgrades to our intercity rail corridors over the coming years.

"Whilst this is, of course, subject to the Government continuing to be satisfied that the proposal offers value for money as the commercial negotiations are concluded and that the final arrangements are compliant with the United Kingdom's EU obligations, I expect that the first of the new trains will be in service by 2016."

"Extending electrification westwards to Bristol and Cardiff will also bring all the benefits of electric trains - faster acceleration, greater comfort and cleaner, greener travel - to rail passengers in Wales and the south west.

"We have also established that a strong high-level case may exist for electrifying some of the Valley lines north of Cardiff. My Department will now work with the Welsh Assembly Government to develop a business case for the electrification of the Cardiff Valley lines."

The ^4.5bn programme will see the building of a combination of around 100 electric trains and bi-mode - diesel and electric - intercity trains which will run to Great Western Main Line stations including Oxford, Swindon, Reading, Cardiff, Swansea, Bath and Bristol and to East Coast Main Line stations such as Peterborough, York, Doncaster, Newcastle, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Inverness.

The train operating companies will contribute to the design and specification of the new fleet of IEP trains in greater detail than they had before. As soon as the trains become operational passengers will see improvements to reliability and comfort.

Notes to Editors

1. Benefits of electric trains over diesel
Electrified railways are essential to getting maximum efficiency and capacity from a modern railway.

Compared to non-electrified railways, electrified railways are:
* Faster;
* Quieter;
* Greener as they produce less CO2 and emit no air pollution at the trackside;
* More reliable;
* Lighter and cause less wear and tear on the tracks;
* More cost-effective for carrying freight loads; and
* Cheaper to buy, operate and maintain.

2. Greener journeys
Rail electrification is an important part of the Department's carbon strategy. Typically an electric train emits between 20% and 35% less carbon per passenger mile than a diesel train. This benefit will only improve as the electricity generation industry reduces its carbon levels. Electric trains also have zero emissions at the point of use, of particular benefit for air quality in pollution hot spots like city centres and mainline stations such as London Paddington.

3. Rail investment
Today's announcement is part of a wider Government rail strategy to meet future increases in passenger demand, promote a move from other transport modes to rail and ensure Britain has the world-class infrastructure it needs. Major projects on the agenda include the ^16bn Crossrail scheme, the ^5.5bn Thameslink modernisation and the new high speed rail link between London and the West Midlands and beyond.

The electrification of Great Western Main Line now creates the option of extending Crossrail further to Reading, with Reading station also getting a ^425m major upgrade which will cut bottlenecks and delays.

The Department for Transport and Network Rail will work closely with the Welsh Assembly to develop a business case for the electrification of the Cardiff Valley Lines and to ensure that plans for electrifying the Great Western Main Line are coordinated with the Assembly's own plans for rail rolling stock in the future Wales and Borders franchise.

4. Minimising disruption
Electric trains are more reliable than diesels. An electric intercity train will travel 40% further than an equivalent diesel train before a technical failure and an electric commuter train will travel well over twice as far.

Network Rail will use newly developed construction techniques which minimise the inconvenience to passengers for work on the Great Western line through utilising high-tech factory trains and extensively using overnight closures of less than eight hours. Passenger Focus will be given a key role in representing travellers' views throughout the work.

5. Intercity Express Programme
The Intercity Express Programme (IEP) has been led by the Department for Transport, with assistance from across the rail industry, since November 2005.

The Programme seeks to replace the distinctive "Intercity 125" High Speed Train (HST) diesel fleet procured by British Rail during the 1970s and 1980s with a new, higher capacity, more environmentally friendly train.

The Intercity Express Programme is independent of "High Speed 2", which was set up to explore options for a new high speed line along the Intercity West Coast corridor.

The original Invitation To Tender, Train Technical Specification and associated procurement documents can be found on the Department for Transport's website, http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/rail/pi/iep/.

In 2009 Agility Trains (a consortium comprising of John Laing and Hitachi) was announced as the preferred bidder. No contracts have yet been signed.
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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

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bignosemac
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« Reply #547 on: March 01, 2011, 05:36:56 pm »

wiring to Severn Beach, weston super mare & taunton if they do these streches of track then it will be a good idea, plus maybe new EMU's could be ordered on the back of the crossrail order if the electrification of those  bits of line  were  given the go ahead.

Actually, WSM and TAU makes a fair bit of sense. CDF-TAU could be EMU'd. Weston's Paddington services can be under the knitting the whole way and services that head south-west via BRI could be bi-mode.

But I suspect that will all be for another day, when there is more money in the pot.
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paul7755
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« Reply #548 on: March 01, 2011, 05:47:06 pm »

I see the press release version mentions the C word...

Crossrail extension to Reading.

Paul
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ZoŽ
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« Reply #549 on: March 01, 2011, 05:57:49 pm »

Crossrail extension to Reading.
Only an option though, the current plan is still to terminate at Maidenhead.
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« Reply #550 on: March 01, 2011, 06:01:11 pm »

I see the press release version mentions the C word...

Crossrail extension to Reading.

Paul
It was an inevitable consequence, makes the TV service pattern more sensible, will reduce the number of 319's needed so they can be cascaded elsewhere the only downside if the Crossrail "Metro" style service is still adopted Twyford and Maidenhead will have an all stops service to London.  A further possibility with the 319's is they are tunnel rated so in theory could run and Oxford / Newbury to Shenfield and even Abbey Wood (if the shoes are left on) service
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Mark Carne 26 June 2015 - "The challenges of delivering myriad improvement projects while still running a railway seven days a week were simply overwhelming".
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« Reply #551 on: March 01, 2011, 06:02:56 pm »

A further possibility with the 319's is they are tunnel rated so in theory could run and Oxford / Newbury to Shenfield and even Abbey Wood (if the shoes are left on) service
Can the 319s have ATO installed?  I'm not sure mixing ATO and non-ATO trains in the tunnel section is a good idea.
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Electric train
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« Reply #552 on: March 01, 2011, 06:06:27 pm »

A further possibility with the 319's is they are tunnel rated so in theory could run and Oxford / Newbury to Shenfield and even Abbey Wood (if the shoes are left on) service
Can the 319s have ATO installed?  I'm not sure mixing ATO and non-ATO trains in the tunnel section is a good idea.
Sure it could be done but realistically I doubt there would the will to do it
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Mark Carne 26 June 2015 - "The challenges of delivering myriad improvement projects while still running a railway seven days a week were simply overwhelming".
inspector_blakey
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« Reply #553 on: March 01, 2011, 06:12:14 pm »

Hammond's statement in full is transcribed on the Railway Eye blog. I'm not going to copy and paste because it's quite long, but you can find it here.
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inspector_blakey
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« Reply #554 on: March 01, 2011, 06:14:08 pm »

IEP looks like it's gone to Hitachi, with the factory at Newton Aycliffe.

It went to Hitachi ages ago surely?  

I think it's fair to say that the Foster review created reasonable doubt, at the very least.
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