Train Graphic
Great Western Passengers' Forum
GWR advice (Project Phoenix)
Forum in and beyond Coronavirus
Great Western Coffee Shop
[home] and [about]
Read about the forum [here].
Register [here] - it's free.
What do I gain from registering? [here]
 18/08/20 - Tuesday Club - ONLINE
24/08/20 - Challenge of Decarb. - ONLINE
16/09/20 - Melksham Rail User Group
17/09/20 - National Rail Awards
Random Image
Train Running Polls Acronyms/Abbreviations Station Comparator Rail news GWR co. site Site Style 1 2 3 4
Next departures • Bristol Temple MeadsBath SpaChippenhamSwindonDidcot ParkwayReadingLondon PaddingtonMelksham
Exeter St DavidsTauntonWestburyTrowbridgeBristol ParkwayCardiff CentralOxfordCheltenham SpaBirmingham New Street
August 15, 2020, 03:06:45 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Forgotten your username or password? - get a reminder
Most liked recent subjects
[94] Finn and bignosemac's return to the rails. Where were we today...
[66] HST derailment, near Stonehaven, 12th August 2020
[56] Gloucester to Hereford via Ross on Wye
[50] 2020 - TransWilts cancellation and amendment log
[49] Air fares in the time of pandemic
[41] And you thought some UK liverys where bad
News: A forum for passengers ... with input from rail professionals welcomed too
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 68 69 [70]
  Print  
Author Topic: HS2 - Government proposals, alternative routes and general discussion  (Read 221914 times)
TonyK
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5111


The artist formerly known as Four Track, Now!


View Profile
« Reply #1035 on: July 16, 2020, 01:47:06 pm »


The IPA is an odd thing. Despite the name, it doesn't really have any authority over projects, or over the funders and customers in government. It's a kind of in-house project management consultancy, advising them on how to do projects well - or, in practice, how not to screw up too badly.

Until very recently, IPA meant nothing to me but my summer choice of tipple. Is this an offshoot of that Commons committee, where we got the change to give margaret Hodge a good listening to frequently?
Logged

Now, please!
Bmblbzzz
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 2909


View Profile
« Reply #1036 on: July 16, 2020, 03:37:16 pm »

To me it means International Phonetic Alphabet. Given sufficient amounts of TonyK's IPA, this can become the Idiomatic Phonetic Ale.
https://www.internationalphoneticassociation.org/content/ipa-chart
Logged

Tuesday had come down through Dundrum and Foster Avenue, brine-fresh from sea-travel, a corn-yellow sun-drench that called forth the bees at an incustomary hour to their bumbling.
stuving
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4902


View Profile
« Reply #1037 on: July 16, 2020, 03:56:55 pm »


The IPA is an odd thing. Despite the name, it doesn't really have any authority over projects, or over the funders and customers in government. It's a kind of in-house project management consultancy, advising them on how to do projects well - or, in practice, how not to screw up too badly.

Until very recently, IPA meant nothing to me but my summer choice of tipple. Is this an offshoot of that Commons committee, where we got the change to give margaret Hodge a good listening to frequently?

This is from the Designing Buildings Wiki:
Quote
On 12 November 2015, the Treasury announced plans to merge two separate bodies to create a new Infrastructure and Projects Authority.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) was created on 1 January 2016, by combining the operations of Infrastructure UK (IUK) and the Major Projects Authority (MPA) to share their in-house knowledge of managing major infrastructure projects. (Ref. Gov.uk 1 January 2015.)

Established in 2010, IUK supported major projects involving public capital as well as leading on PFI policy across government. Established in 2011, the MPA was given a mandate to oversee and assure 200 of the largest government projects totaling nearly 500bn in public spending. Their function was to develop programme management expertise within the civil service and intervene if projects went wrong.

The new Infrastructure and Projects Authority provides expertise, knowledge and skills in managing and delivering major economic projects for the government. It brings together financing, delivery and assurance of projects ranging from large-scale infrastructure projects such as Crossrail and the Thames Tideway Tunnel to major transformation programmes such as Universal Credit. 'Major projects' are those which require HM Treasury funding approval during their life cycle.

It reports jointly to the Chancellor and to the minister for the Cabinet Office. The chief executive Tony Meggs transferred from his role as interim chief executive for the MPA. Geoffrey Spence, chief executive of IUK, left government service for the private sector.

So it's a bit of very central government - the Cabinet Office and the Treasury being about as central as government gets. It's supposed to give backup to Whitehall departments that have to fund and oversee, and to that extent manage, big projects. Whether it has anything useful to say to project managers in the industrial or engineering layers of such projects is something I've never manged to work out. I rather suspect that if they claimed expertise in that area they'd be told, with a suitable level of politeness, where to deploy themselves.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2020, 11:28:06 am by stuving » Logged
stuving
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4902


View Profile
« Reply #1038 on: July 25, 2020, 09:59:45 am »

From Dezeen:
Quote
Grimshaw unveils design for HS2 ventilation shaft disguised as barn
India Block | 20 hours ago 5 comments

A ventilation shaft for the UK's new HS2 high-speed railway has been designed by British architecture practice Grimshaw to resemble a barn clad in zinc and bronze.

The Chalfont St Peter Ventilation Shaft, or headhouse, will provide ventilation and emergency access to a 10-mile-long train tunnel through the Chilterns a set of hills to the northwest of London.
Chalfont St Peter Ventilation Shaft for HS2 by Grimshaw

As the Chilterns are a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), Grimshaw has proposed a design that will disguise the piece of infrastructure as a simple agricultural building.

Set back from the main road, the Chalfont St Peter Ventilation Shaft will look like a smart barn, clad in industrial grey zinc with deep bronze accents on the doors and vent openings. The zinc will be pre-weathered and will darken over time, complimenting its plinth of blue-toned bricks.

Underneath, a 60-metre shaft will reach down to the HS2 railway tunnel below...

I really don't think that needs a comment.
Logged
TonyN
Transport Scholar
Full Member
******
Posts: 58


View Profile
« Reply #1039 on: July 31, 2020, 09:48:37 pm »

Chris Packam has lost the right to Appeal.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/jul/31/chris-packham-loses-appeal-against-hs2-rail-project
Logged
Red Squirrel
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3743


There are some who call me... Tim


View Profile
« Reply #1040 on: July 31, 2020, 10:12:35 pm »

Perhaps he can redirect his energies to opposing the Lower Thames Crossing now?
Logged
stuving
Transport Scholar
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4902


View Profile
« Reply #1041 on: July 31, 2020, 10:41:15 pm »


Chris Packham was refused permission to apply for a judicial review, and has now been refused permission to appeal against that decision and to apply for judicial review (again). That's the result of a hearing that looks awfully like a mini-appeal - there's 30 pages of their lordships' highest quality legal prose resulting from it, if you fancy that. However, these days the Court of Appeal provides press summaries of its judgements - and that's just a couple of pages. This also covers the London Borough of Hillingdon's successful appeal against the governemnt, confirming their right to refuse an approval to HS2 if the application is not accompanied by all the supporting information required.
Logged
TonyK
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5111


The artist formerly known as Four Track, Now!


View Profile
« Reply #1042 on: July 31, 2020, 11:56:29 pm »


Chris Packham was refused permission to apply for a judicial review, and has now been refused permission to appeal against that decision and to apply for judicial review (again). That's the result of a hearing that looks awfully like a mini-appeal - there's 30 pages of their lordships' highest quality legal prose resulting from it, if you fancy that. However, these days the Court of Appeal provides press summaries of its judgements - and that's just a couple of pages. This also covers the London Borough of Hillingdon's successful appeal against the governemnt, confirming their right to refuse an approval to HS2 if the application is not accompanied by all the supporting information required.

It does indeed look like a mini-appeal, possibly even a mid-range one. I suppose it would look churlish were they to just say no, we're not hearing it. Two of the four grounds argued in the first case were dropped, and I think the logic is that by debunking the remaining two in their entirety, they can save the bother of sending the case back to the lower court just to have it come back again. Whatever the logic, the court did a pretty thorough job of it, seemingly accepting that an electric railway is likely to be less polluting than the cars and aircraft it will replace. That, I think, will be that. Heading to the Supreme Court would be a matter of throwing even more good money after bad.
Logged

Now, please!
TonyK
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5111


The artist formerly known as Four Track, Now!


View Profile
« Reply #1043 on: August 07, 2020, 10:17:00 am »

In further news, reports that work at OOC has reached a new phase.

Quote
HS2 station contractors take over Old Oak Common site
04 AUG, 2020 BY ROB HORGAN

High Speed 2s (HS2s) station construction partner, a JV between Balfour Beatty and Vinci Systra (BBVS), has taken possession of the whole Old Oak Common station site in West London.

The handover marks the start of the next phase of work at Old Oak Common, where a 14 platform high-speed station will be built.

This follows more than two years of work at the site led by HS2s enabling works contractor, Costain Skanska JV, who have cleared the site for the new station to be built, including demolishing the Great Western Railway train stabling sheds and the largest rail maintenance facility in Europe.

BBVS were appointed as HS2s construction partner for Old Oak Common in September 2019 and since then have been working closely with HS2 Ltd to design the programme of works to construct the new station.

When operational, the station will be used by up to an estimated 250,000 passengers each day and is set to become one of the busiest in the country connecting HS2 to the Elizabeth Line (Crossrail) and provide links to Heathrow Airport, Wales and the West of England.
...(continues at source}.

It looks like they are going ahead with it.
Logged

Now, please!
TonyN
Transport Scholar
Full Member
******
Posts: 58


View Profile
« Reply #1044 on: August 07, 2020, 11:31:06 am »

I hope they don't mean possession in the railway sense. All passenger trains needing to terminate at Ealing Broadway for the next N years. Roll Eyes
Logged
Do you have something you would like to add to this thread, or would you like to raise a new question at the Coffee Shop? Please [register] (it is free) if you have not done so before, or login (at the top of this page) if you already have an account - we would love to read what you have to say!

You can find out more about how this forum works [here] - that will link you to a copy of the forum agreement that you can read before you join, and tell you very much more about how we operate. We are an independent forum, provided and run by customers of Great Western Railway, for customers of Great Western Railway and we welcome railway professionals as members too, in either a personal or official capacity. Views expressed in posts are not necessarily the views of the operators of the forum.

As well as posting messages onto existing threads, and starting new subjects, members can communicate with each other through personal messages if they wish. And once members have made a certain number of posts, they will automatically be admitted to the "frequent posters club", where subjects not-for-public-domain are discussed; anything from the occasional rant to meetups we may be having ...

 
Pages: 1 ... 68 69 [70]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
This forum is provided by a customer of Great Western Railway (formerly First Great Western), and the views expressed are those of the individual posters concerned. Visit www.gwr.com for the official Great Western Railway website. Please contact the administrators of this site if you feel that the content provided by one of our posters contravenes our posting rules (email link). Forum hosted by Well House Consultants

Jump to top of pageJump to Forum Home Page