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Author Topic: Reading Station improvements  (Read 973819 times)
stuving
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« Reply #3360 on: December 01, 2017, 08:52:53 pm »

It wasn't exactly a greenfield site beforehand, wasn't it some sort of freight depot originally, and then saw use as an infrastructure depot.  How close did the old freight bypass lines go.   When were the houses built, in terms of the railway timeline?

I think the history of the railway use of the site should set some sort of a precedent.  Haven't there been similar noise objections to existing DMU depots in the north Oxford area, from recent new build properties?

Paul 

The railway was there first, of course, though I don't how much of a right that give to be noisy. The houses (and Cardiff Road itself) date from around 1900, by which time there were sidings at the eastern and western end of the current depot area, and also in between, on both sides of Cow Lane. These siding were quite short, and in between at the western half of the current eastern sidings looks like railway land, with a range of small buildings in it, but no identified use. All of those sidings were still there, but no longer used I think, ten years ago.

The big engine shed was south of the railway, near the Hodsoll Road access into the triangle, where there were still sidings up to RSAR. Next to the sidings behind Cardiff Road the 1900 map says "cattle pens", no doubt connected with the cattle market in Great Knollys Street and guess what in Abattoirs Road (which is immediately south of the railway off Caversham Road).

The rest of Cardiff Road was and is industrial, but much of it is now half-derelicit at least. The block north of the houses closest to that suspect building was Cox & Wyman, who printed paperbacks there until 2015. That is likely to be redeveloped for housing, but the planning application, promised "soon" in July, has not materialised yet. 
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IndustryInsider
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« Reply #3361 on: December 01, 2017, 09:18:17 pm »

The railway was there first, of course, though I don't how much of a right that give to be noisy. The houses (and Cardiff Road itself) date from around 1900, by which time there were sidings at the eastern and western end of the current depot area, and also in between, on both sides of Cow Lane. These siding were quite short, and in between at the western half of the current eastern sidings looks like railway land, with a range of small buildings in it, but no identified use. All of those sidings were still there, but no longer used I think, ten years ago.

Various stores and equipment buildings remained in at least partial use up until around 2009, but use was very limited in terms of railway vehicles.  Some time before that there was sporadic use for maintenance of wagons, one of the sidings had an inspection pit, and going back even further the resident pilot locomotive was usually to be found lurking in one of the sidings along with a few wagons that seemingly had no other home to go to, but certainly noises would have been far less regular since way back in the 80s.
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To view my cab run over the new Reading Viaduct as well as a relief line cab ride at Reading just after Platforms 12-15 opened and my 'before and after' video comparison of the Cotswold Line Redoubling scheme, see: http://www.dailymotion.com/user/IndustryInsider/1
onthecushions
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« Reply #3362 on: December 01, 2017, 09:25:55 pm »

While the railway was there before the houses, only the eastern third of Cardiff Road is residential, the rest, backing onto the railway is light industrial. One of the best car mechanics around, Chiltern Autos, is based there.

It would have made sense in designing the new depot to locate all the operational buildings at the western end of the site, out of site and earshot of residents and with better road access. The width of the plot is constant so there was no problem. Perhaps recordings of diesel engines running in the early hours should be supplied to Grayling, Maynard etc.

OTC
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IndustryInsider
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« Reply #3363 on: December 01, 2017, 09:57:30 pm »

It is the east sidings not the operational/maintenance buildings that are causing the problem.  You could have designed the layout differently but it would have been a sub optimum design if you had the maintenance shed at the eastern end where you want all your trains delivered for service as effectively as possible as the current east sidings do.
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To view my cab run over the new Reading Viaduct as well as a relief line cab ride at Reading just after Platforms 12-15 opened and my 'before and after' video comparison of the Cotswold Line Redoubling scheme, see: http://www.dailymotion.com/user/IndustryInsider/1
ellendune
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« Reply #3364 on: December 02, 2017, 09:25:42 am »

It would have made sense in designing the new depot to locate all the operational buildings at the western end of the site, out of site and earshot of residents and with better road access.

They are - they are all west of Cow Lane!

Perhaps recordings of diesel engines running in the early hours should be supplied to Grayling, Maynard etc.

If course if they were electric units there would be no reving of engines, but that project was delivered late, so hopefully come January....
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IndustryInsider
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« Reply #3365 on: December 02, 2017, 09:46:15 am »

The situation will become much better in January.  Diesel trains will still be in those sidings, but in far fewer numbers.
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To view my cab run over the new Reading Viaduct as well as a relief line cab ride at Reading just after Platforms 12-15 opened and my 'before and after' video comparison of the Cotswold Line Redoubling scheme, see: http://www.dailymotion.com/user/IndustryInsider/1
stuving
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« Reply #3366 on: December 02, 2017, 11:59:04 am »

The situation will become much better in January.  Diesel trains will still be in those sidings, but in far fewer numbers.

Some earlier pictures labelled the eastern sidings as "maintenance depot for proposed IEP". Obviously that's "maintenance" in the lightest, daily, sense, though that word "proposed" tells you how earlier that was. But won't we reach a point where the Turbos will all fit in the western sidings?

I did wonder earlier, while describing the geography in words, whether it would have been easier to provide a picture. Several thousand words later, here is one. It can also serve for the other, hypothetically malodorous, current discussion on another thread.

The picture (dated 25 March 2017) shows the eastern sidings, from Cow Lane to Caversham Road. Cardiff Road to the north has houses only at its east end, where those on its south reach halfway along the sidings. On the north side they extend a little further, but with about half the space occupied by the Cox & Wyman factory. It is just within 50 m of the nearest houses.

There are a few buildings past the western end of the sidings, of which the slightly skewed one is the "east CET plant room". The original planning application said this would not be built until a later date "when required for IEP". The west CET plant room would be built at the start, next to the western sidings - I'm not sure what that implies in terms of what trains sleep where or when in the grand scheme of things (GWR subsection).

The wide rectangular "balcony" extending the level surface at embankment height, about halfway along the sidings, is where this new "CET waste processing" building is being built.
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Tim
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« Reply #3367 on: December 02, 2017, 01:10:53 pm »


The railway was there first, of course, though I don't how much of a right that give to be noisy.

As I understand it, planning law does not take into account who was built first.  Just because the railway or airport or church bell tower was there before your house was built does not diminish the right of you to object.  However, the principle that homeowners have a right not to be disturbed does take into account the nature of the area.  Those living in an urban area are expected to put up with a certain amount of noise which might be unreasonable in a rural area. 
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ellendune
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« Reply #3368 on: December 02, 2017, 02:19:47 pm »


The railway was there first, of course, though I don't how much of a right that give to be noisy.

As I understand it, planning law does not take into account who was built first.  Just because the railway or airport or church bell tower was there before your house was built does not diminish the right of you to object.  However, the principle that homeowners have a right not to be disturbed does take into account the nature of the area.  Those living in an urban area are expected to put up with a certain amount of noise which might be unreasonable in a rural area. 

The scope of planning law is very limited in this respect.  In planning law an objection can only be made where a planning application is required.

If you were to substitute the law of nuisance in place of planning law. Then I think you are correct. 
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Chris from Nailsea
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« Reply #3369 on: December 02, 2017, 05:37:43 pm »

Those living in an urban area are expected to put up with a certain amount of noise which might be unreasonable in a rural area. 

You'd perhaps be surprised.  From the BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-20572854  Roll Eyes

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William Huskisson MP was the first person to be killed by a train while crossing the tracks, in 1830.  Many more have died in the same way since then.  Don't take a chance: stop, look, listen.

"Level crossings are safe, unless they are used in an unsafe manner."  Discuss.
bobm
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« Reply #3370 on: December 02, 2017, 07:03:15 pm »

Is it an old wives tale, when they first built the Big Yellow Bridge by Reading Station (Vastern Road), the first double-decker bus got stuck under the bridge?

Could very well be true.   For years there were metal plates in the cabs of several Reading Transport double deckers saying "This vehicle will not pass under Vastern Road Bridge".
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onthecushions
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« Reply #3371 on: December 02, 2017, 09:27:06 pm »

It would have made sense in designing the new depot to locate all the operational buildings at the western end of the site, out of site and earshot of residents and with better road access.

They are - they are all west of Cow Lane!


My point was that the smelly/noisy un-neighbourly activities on the site should be as far from the houses as practicable. It's simple good manners.

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Gordon the Blue Engine
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« Reply #3372 on: December 22, 2017, 04:09:17 pm »

Just seen an interesting move on OTT which shows what can be done with the new layout west of Reading.  1E56 1545 Reading Newcastle was routed out of P14B via the Up Loop to avoid conflict with 2K67 1513 Newbury Reading which was approaching P13B via the Feeder Relief.

At Tilehurst East 1E56 then crossed the whole layout and went through Tilehurst on the DM. 

Hope the XC Driver was tickety-boo on his route knowledge and signal route indications!

Bit sad to be looking at OTT when I probably should be peeling potatoes or generally doing something useful.  Merry Christmas everyone. 
« Last Edit: December 22, 2017, 04:17:42 pm by Gordon the Blue Engine » Logged
CyclingSid
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« Reply #3373 on: January 25, 2018, 07:30:22 am »

After yesterday's rain there was considerable traffic disruption in Reading, partly caused by flooding under the Vastern Road bridge:
https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/live-updates-as-vastern-road-in-reading-closed/
in the Reading Chronicle there was an added (olefactory?) extra:
http://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/15894010.UPDATED__Vastern_Road_closed_both_ways_due_to_sewage_issue_after_downpour/
hopefully only Storm, and not Foul drainage.
Is this a sign of things to come when the have finished digging out under Cow Lane Bridge?
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Interceptor
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« Reply #3374 on: January 25, 2018, 03:42:58 pm »

This is quite interesting. I remember back in 2007 just after I started work at Reading, a massive rain storm caused a similar problem under the then not widened Vastern Road bridge. The pumping station to deal with such events is located in the roundabout on the south side. I was led to believe that for some reasons the pumps did not cut in. However, the man sent to sort it out (presume a Thames Water technician) was stranded in traffic in the area and could not get there quickly so the flood waters deepened.
Regarding Cow Lane, the design, when I last saw it, did include for a pumping system to deal with any similar occurrence. Proof will be in the future once the works are completed.
One other little bit of trivia that may be of interest. We undertook a very extensive bore hole survey throughout the area ahead of works commencing. We found (I recall 2008 or 2009) that we were finding ground water about 1 to 2 m below ground level around the multi storey car park on the north side. However, once works kicked off fully mid 2011 onwards, the ground water level was considerably lower. Whilst no one probably appreciated it, the aquifers were quite depleted. The extremely heavy rains of the following winters thus having no ability to "top up" the aquifers slowly resulting in flooding in many areas. I do not know what the situation today is though.
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