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Author Topic: Reading Station improvements  (Read 1108610 times)
Thatcham Crossing
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« Reply #3405 on: September 24, 2019, 04:29:42 pm »

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This means that a mere 12"/305mm of water can drown and write off a car

Happened to someone I know a few years back. Was proceeding slowly/gingerly through a flood (probably less than 12"). Bow-wave created by large 4x4 coming the other way goes through the front of his car - written off  Shocked
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eightonedee
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« Reply #3406 on: September 24, 2019, 10:48:21 pm »

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Oops, lots of flooding through Cow Lane Bridge this morning, certainly does not cope with heavy downpours. Cars either not going through, with some risking it failing due to water in the engine.

How long did this last for? Does anyone know? I thought one of the reasons the work took so long was that they struggled to get the answer to this problem

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Posted by: onthecushions
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Modern cars can have their air intake ducted from low down at the front, not through a carburettor and air filter above the engine. This means that a mere 12"/305mm of water can drown and write off a car, breaking an engine connecting rod.

Be warned.

Yes - even some 4x4 models from manufacturers who do not specialise in such vehicles. "Proper" 4x4s like Land Rovers and Jeeps have their air intakes positioned to give them a much deeper safe wading depth.

One of our near neighbours discovered this to his cost during the flooding early in 2014. Our combined drive floods in extreme conditions, and we had over a foot across it. He thought it would be fun to charge through in his (company) BMW X3. The inevitable happened - water into intake, compressed in the block, engine wrecked. To make matters worse for his dignity, not only did he have to paddle to get to dry land, but he put the transmission into Park from which it would not budge, so it had the indignity of having to be towed out with all 4 wheels locked by another neighbour's Jeep!   

« Last Edit: September 24, 2019, 11:16:29 pm by eightonedee » Logged
Adelante_CCT
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« Reply #3407 on: September 25, 2019, 06:19:42 am »

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How long did this last for? Does anyone know?

I passed through at 05:30 and all was fine, by 07:00 the water was extremely high with some avoiding and others taking the risk. Reports suggest that the road was closed from 08:45 until 09:30, by which time the levels were low enough to reopen the road, albeit via a single lane contra flow due to a few cars having broken down either under the bridge or at the top of the hill.

A customer of mine passed through around 10:15 and said it had all cleared. I went through again at 14:45 and men were still on standby just in case.

It has been reported that the (new) pumps had failed and that the warning system for such an event had also failed  Roll Eyes
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patch38
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« Reply #3408 on: September 25, 2019, 10:10:31 am »

"Proper" 4x4s like Land Rovers and Jeeps have their air intakes positioned to give them a much deeper safe wading depth.


You still need to know how to drive through standing water though, even in a 4x4. Stopping to assess the flood for depth and obstructions is what most people fail to do and then driving through at a speed high enough to maintain the bow-wave. If you are really serious about wading, a raised air intake (RAI) or 'snorkel' is the order of the day - that way the water will be over your head before it gets into the engine!

Taking the 'I've got a 4x4' attitude of just turning up and driving blindly into a flood is every bit as likely to end in misery in a Jeep or LR as it is in an 'ordinary' vehicle, as the X3 story above proves.
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Reading General
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« Reply #3409 on: September 25, 2019, 10:21:40 am »

Driving through a Ford was something my dad insisted I experience when I first learnt  as well as driving in the snow. Off we went to Bucklebury after I had passed my test to find out. That was the early 90ís, I doubt Bucklebury Ford ever gets over a couple of inches anymore.
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bobm
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« Reply #3410 on: September 25, 2019, 10:36:21 am »

I doubt Bucklebury Ford ever gets over a couple of inches anymore.

I doubt it does but it does suffer from 4X4s who enter the ford and then turn left or right to follow the stream.  Something which has exercised the Parish Council over the years.
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #3411 on: September 25, 2019, 01:05:43 pm »

Talking of fords, who else is amused by the road signs which say "Ford: road liable to flooding"? And even better, one I've seen in Warwickshire, "Ford: impassable at all times".
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Day return to Infinity, please.
eightonedee
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« Reply #3412 on: September 25, 2019, 02:05:39 pm »

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You still need to know how to drive through standing water though, even in a 4x4. Stopping to assess the flood for depth and obstructions is what most people fail to do and then driving through at a speed high enough to maintain the bow-wave. If you are really serious about wading, a raised air intake (RAI) or 'snorkel' is the order of the day - that way the water will be over your head before it gets into the engine!

Taking the 'I've got a 4x4' attitude of just turning up and driving blindly into a flood is every bit as likely to end in misery in a Jeep or LR as it is in an 'ordinary' vehicle, as the X3 story above proves.

Happy to endorse that - there's a picture in our living room of me in my now very elderly Discovery doing just that in the 2003 floods  that featured in the Goring Gap News at the time. For a demonstration of how to do it, see the following-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypuHsPse9Zc

in which Adrian Lawson drives his Defender through the floods around the south of Theale Gravel Pits during the 2014 floods.
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CyclingSid
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« Reply #3413 on: September 26, 2019, 07:10:57 am »

Probably better than on his bike!
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eightonedee
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« Reply #3414 on: November 09, 2019, 11:50:00 am »

Getting this thread back on subject, I am pleased to report (at last) some improvement to the destination/information signage.

The electronic board by the town entrance was replaced this week with a new one with white lettering, two panels of departures in chronological order that manage together to give nearly an hours worth of train information, and three panels of destination by destination information. Better still, each line of information shows platform number, timetabled departure and estimated time continuously (not alternating), and when a train departs the information whizzes off to the side in a rather fetching manner and the information below moves up without any great blank gaps in the display. A (very poor with the phone which doesn't do it justice) snap attached.

Now lets roll out signage of this standard throughout the station and finish the job properly!   
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stuving
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« Reply #3415 on: November 09, 2019, 12:05:25 pm »

Getting this thread back on subject, I am pleased to report (at last) some improvement to the destination/information signage.

The electronic board by the town entrance was replaced this week with a new one with white lettering, two panels of departures in chronological order that manage together to give nearly an hours worth of train information, and three panels of destination by destination information. Better still, each line of information shows platform number, timetabled departure and estimated time continuously (not alternating), and when a train departs the information whizzes off to the side in a rather fetching manner and the information below moves up without any great blank gaps in the display. A (very poor with the phone which doesn't do it justice) snap attached.

Now lets roll out signage of this standard throughout the station and finish the job properly!   

Yesterday afternoon, due to the line closure, each screen was also timesharing with a message about that. This involved each whole screenful whizing off sideways and the message whizzing in for a few seconds. Annoying for one screen, as the cycle time didn't allow long enough to find what you were looking for. With a bank of them doing it, apparently, asynchronously, it's rather distracting.

I also find these new screens markedly less clear to read, due to the use of a minimal 7x5 matrix instead of the 9x7 (I think) previously. Not too bad for a canopy-dangler, but these ones are higher up and a lot of people will struggle to read them. So more useful information, but at a cost.
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eightonedee
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« Reply #3416 on: November 10, 2019, 07:04:43 pm »

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Yesterday afternoon, due to the line closure, each screen was also timesharing with a message about that. This involved each whole screenful whizing off sideways and the message whizzing in for a few seconds. Annoying for one screen, as the cycle time didn't allow long enough to find what you were looking for. With a bank of them doing it, apparently, asynchronously, it's rather distracting.

I also find these new screens markedly less clear to read, due to the use of a minimal 7x5 matrix instead of the 9x7 (I think) previously. Not too bad for a canopy-dangler, but these ones are higher up and a lot of people will struggle to read them. So more useful information, but at a cost.

Oh - not so keen on the emergency message system (although I've yet to see it in action, but understand the point you are making). However I recognise that there's a damned if you do, damned if you don't element to this. If there's not prominent notification of major problems there's bound to be complaints. Perhaps confining this to the middle screen might be preferable, but this immediately raises the issue - should those after destinations in the first third of the alphabet lose out when a major incident triggering such a message occurs?

As to the legibility/pixel issue, I still have reasonably good distant vision, so didn't notice this. Is it a feature of what appears to be a new generation of "white" electronic signs? Stuving - do you also find this with the new platform signs at Wokingham?

I still rate the new signs at Reading as a step forward, though. 
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