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March 21, 2019, 07:39:54 pm *
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Author Topic: Electric Bicycles  (Read 333 times)
grahame
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« on: March 02, 2019, 01:15:34 pm »

From Medical Express

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Older cyclists who use electric bicycles may be getting the same brain benefits as those on standard bikes.

The new research, published in PLOS One conducted at the University of Reading and Oxford Brookes University found that cyclists between the ages of 50-83 experienced cognitive and mental health benefits from riding a bicycle, whether it was electrically assisted or pedal powered.

Any of our members use electric cycles?   Any take them on the train?
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Red Squirrel
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2019, 02:32:43 pm »

Apparently they are more popular than regular bicycles in Holland now!
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grahame
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2019, 03:25:25 pm »


More popular with whom?

I'm reminded of the joke about the bloke selling a loaf of bread and advertising it at the "popular price of £5.00". "That's not a popular price - that's extortion" says a potential customer.  "I like the price - it's popular with me" says the bloke selling the loaf.

Calculating on figures in the article. The Dutch cycle market it worth EUR1.2bn per year,  and 409,400 electric cycles were sold last year for over EUR2000 each.  That's a total of EUR818m.  The overall average cost for a cycle was EUR1207 making for total sales of 994,000 cycles of all types - if you take any the electric ones, that leaves you with 585,000 others (pedal only), each at EUR653 on average.  The article goes on to say the the EUR1207 figure quoted is up by EUR200 (over a period) and quotes an overall figure of EUR734 in 2011.

So - new cycles in numeric terms are still just 42% electric - but in cost terms they generate 68% of the income of those who sell them ... with who (for income reasons) I can appreciate them being more popular that push bikes.
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4064ReadingAbbey
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2019, 05:21:02 pm »

Electrically assisted bikes are also very popular in Germany. There are two main types, the e-bike which is essentially an electric moped - that is it runs on battery power alone and one doesn't have to pedal - and the pedelec. The electric motor in the latter only assists the pedalling action - if one stops pedalling the electric assistance also stops.

If the e-bike can exceed a certain speed - I think it's 15kph - then the rider must have insurance like a moped. Equally the pedelec must not supply assistance if the speed is greater than than the 15?kph.

Both my wife an I have pedelecs which we bought in Germany six or seven years ago. Brilliant - essentially the motor support cancels out the headwind...!

Obviously they are slightly heavier than a normal bike but both fit a heavy duty bike carrier which locks onto the tow hitch of our car.

To be recommended.
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2019, 05:49:39 pm »

Ebikes that supply power when the rider is not pedalling are not legal in UK (unless registered, insured, etc as an electric moped, of course – in which case the speed limit becomes 30mph not 15mph). There are plenty of them around of course, just as there are plenty of pedelecs which carry on supplying power at over 15mph. In fact the only electric bike users I know (both actually have trikes) have modified their cycles to operate on power without pedalling (one has a switch, the other has a throttle) for disability reasons (they both have mobility problems). Neither has altered the 15mph cut out though. (As a further factlet, I think switch or throttle power is legal in UK at walking speed, which has a legal definition for this purpose – not sure of the precise figure but it's around 3 or 4 mph. This is to assist low-speed manoeuvrability, such as through gates.)
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brompton rail
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2019, 08:40:59 pm »

I think a throttle on an ebike is OK as long as it adjust the power input to the motor (other bikes use a simple + or - to adjust power). This adjust the power of the electric motor from ‘no power’ up to ‘max’ or ‘turbo’ (on Bosch motors). However the point is that unless the rider turns the pedals and applies pressure the motor will not kick in. So, you ride easily along the flat with minimum power, or no power, and then come to a hill and you can add power so that YOU are putting in the same effort but the motor is helping too.

Taking electric bikes on trains is as ‘easy’ or ‘difficult’ as an ordinary bike. I have taken both a Brompton Electric folder and Gazelle ebikes and other full size ebikes on trains with little problems. However electric bikes are heavier than ordinary bikes and lifting them into HSTs etc can be challenging. Gazelle bikes don’t fit into Voyager cupboards so might be problematic on IETs. Class 150s, 158s and even Pacers aren’t much of a problem.
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Bmblbzzz
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2019, 10:36:57 pm »

I think a throttle on an ebike is OK as long as it adjust the power input to the motor (other bikes use a simple + or - to adjust power). This adjust the power of the electric motor from ‘no power’ up to ‘max’ or ‘turbo’ (on Bosch motors).
Yes. I was thinking of something different though, or two different things: a throttle that adjusts speed directly to the wheel, like a motorbike throttle, which is illegal but fairly common; and a "walk" button, which AIUI is legal.
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However the point is that unless the rider turns the pedals and applies pressure the motor will not kick in. So, you ride easily along the flat with minimum power, or no power, and then come to a hill and you can add power so that YOU are putting in the same effort but the motor is helping too.
Yes, that's how they're meant to work in British law. In most of Europe (I'm not sure about America and places) I think it's legal to have power without pedalling, as long as the motor cuts out at 25km/h. Again, it's common to see bikes like this in UK too, either grey imports or illegal home mods.
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